Clauses and commas
Preview only Sign up to use worksheet Signup now
  • Introduction
PREVIEW ONLY. SIGN UP TO USE WORKSHEET.

Different parts of a sentence are called clauses and they are separated by commas.

For example:

I like apples, especially if they are sweet.

I like apples - this is the main cause because it makes sense on its own.

especially if they are sweet - this is the subordinate clause because it does not make sense on its own.

A comma is used to separate the main clause in a sentence from the subordinate clause. The main clause is not always at the beginning of the sentence. Sometimes (but not always), you can swap the clauses around and still have a sentence that makes sense.

  • Question 1
PREVIEW ONLY. SIGN UP TO USE WORKSHEET.

Select the sentence where the commas correctly separate the main clause from the subordinate clause:

 

Hoping to get further attention the cat purred.

Hoping to get further, attention the cat purred.

Hoping to get further attention, the cat purred.

  • Question 2
PREVIEW ONLY. SIGN UP TO USE WORKSHEET.

Select the sentence where the commas correctly separate the main clause from the subordinate clause:

 

Because of all the fuss they were making I stopped asking for help.

Because of all the fuss, they were making I stopped asking for help.

Because of all the fuss they were making, I stopped asking for help.

  • Question 3
PREVIEW ONLY. SIGN UP TO USE WORKSHEET.

Select the sentence where the commas correctly separate the main clause from the subordinate clause:

 

Wiping the paint off my hands I went to answer the phone.

Wiping the paint off my hands, I went to answer the phone.

Wiping the paint, off my hands I went to answer the phone.

  • Question 4
PREVIEW ONLY. SIGN UP TO USE WORKSHEET.

Select the sentence where the commas correctly separate the main clause from the subordinate clause:

  

David likes cricket although he admits he is not very good.

David likes cricket although he admits, he is not very good.

David likes cricket, although he admits he is not very good.

  • Question 5
PREVIEW ONLY. SIGN UP TO USE WORKSHEET.

Select the sentence where the commas correctly separate the main clause from the subordinate clause:

 

In spite of all the trouble they were in they still carried on misbehaving.

In spite, of all the trouble, they were in they still carried on misbehaving.

In spite of all the trouble they were in, they still carried on misbehaving.

  • Question 6
PREVIEW ONLY. SIGN UP TO USE WORKSHEET.

Select the sentence where the commas correctly separate the main clause from the subordinate clause:


The horse galloped off snorting and kicking its heels.

The horse, galloped off snorting and kicking its heels.

The horse galloped off, snorting and kicking its heels.

Progress