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Two simple sentences can be combined into one complex sentence with a main clause and a subordinate clause.

My dog is called Freddie. My dog likes bones. (simple sentences)

My dog, who likes bones, is called Freddie. (complex sentence)

 

The main clause makes sense on its own.

My dog, who likes bones, is called Freddie.

 

The subordinate clause does not make sense on its own.

My dog, who likes bones, is called Freddie.

 

We need to put commas around the subordinate clause to make the sentence easier to read and understand.

 

The two sentences could also be combined in a different way, so that the information about the bones is the main clause and the dog's name is the subordinate clause.

My dog, who is called Freddie, likes bones.

 

When we combine sentences in this way, we use the linking word who for people and pets and which for other animals and non-living things.

The tiger, which had finished its meal, was lying under the tree.

The car, which had cost a lot of money, was parked on the drive.

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