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Identify Text Meaning

In this worksheet, students gain practice in recognising and completing similes and metaphors.

'Identify Text Meaning' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:  English

Curriculum subtopic:  Standard Comprehension

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

Similes and metaphors are both figures of speech. They are ways of describing an object by comparing it to something else.

 

A simile uses the words 'like' or 'as....as'.

boat

His feet are as big as boats.

 

A metaphor states that one thing is something else. It is a comparison, but it does not use 'like' or 'as....as' to make the comparison.

 

His feet are boats.

 

In stating that 'his feet are boats', we mean that his feet are very big.

Some similes are very well known and used a lot in everyday speech.

 

Match up the boxes to complete these common similes.

Column A

Column B

as old as
a button
as bright as
a rock
as solid as
the hills
a thin as
a rake

These similes are all comparisons with animals. Match up the boxes to complete them.

Column A

Column B

as blind as
a peacock
as stubborn as
a mule
as cunning as
a bat
as proud as
a fox

Read the description of a river and decide whether it contains a simile or a metaphor.

 

The river winds its way through the valley like a snake.

simile

metaphor

This time, read the description of two twins and decide whether it contains a simile or a metaphor.

 

Those twins are two peas in a pod.

 

simile

metaphor

Is this boy using a simile or a metaphor when describing his sister?

 

My sister is a pain in the neck.

simile

metaphor

Is this girl using a simile or a metaphor when describing her grandmother?

 

My nanna has a heart of gold.

simile

metaphor

Read this short passage and decide what the underlined metaphor means.

 

John is on the crest of a wave at the moment. He won first prize in the fancy dress competition and now he's come top in the talent show.

John is feeling tired.

John is very successful.

John is working hard.

What do you think the underlined metaphor means this time?

 

James is playing with fire at the moment. He hasn't done any homework for the last week and he was late for school two days running.

James is lighting matches.

James is likely to get into trouble.

James is lazy.

What do you think the underlined simile means this time?

 

Jake felt like a fish out of water with all the girls at the dance class. He was the only boy there.

Jake felt awkward because he was different from the others.

Jake couldn't dance.

Jake didn't have the right dance clothes.

What do you think the underlined metaphor means this time?

 

That news is music to my ears!

I am listening to a nice tune.

I have heard some news about a new song.

The news pleases me very much.

  • Question 1

Some similes are very well known and used a lot in everyday speech.

 

Match up the boxes to complete these common similes.

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

as old as
the hills
as bright as
a button
as solid as
a rock
a thin as
a rake
EDDIE SAYS
The trick here is to find any that you know first. Look through the list and try to match up the the answers that seem most likely to go together. \'As solid as\' is more likely to be \'a rock\' as a rock is the hardest and most solid.
  • Question 2

These similes are all comparisons with animals. Match up the boxes to complete them.

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

as blind as
a bat
as stubborn as
a mule
as cunning as
a fox
as proud as
a peacock
EDDIE SAYS
Again you need to look at the options that you think are most likely to go together. \'As blind as a\' Which animal is known for not being able to see well. Bats are nocturnal animals that can only see in the dark, so this option seems the most likely. You got this!
  • Question 3

Read the description of a river and decide whether it contains a simile or a metaphor.

 

The river winds its way through the valley like a snake.

CORRECT ANSWER
simile
EDDIE SAYS
Great effort! This example uses a simile. When something is compared to another object, person or animal this is a simile. You can often identify a simile as it uses \'like\' or \'as....as\'.
  • Question 4

This time, read the description of two twins and decide whether it contains a simile or a metaphor.

 

Those twins are two peas in a pod.

 

CORRECT ANSWER
metaphor
EDDIE SAYS
The comparison does not use the words \'as...as\' or \'like\' so it is a metaphor. A metaphor is a figure of speech that describes an object or action in a way that isn\'t literally true. In this example the \'twins\' aren\'t actually \'peas in a pod\' but the description gives the reader the idea that they were very close.
  • Question 5

Is this boy using a simile or a metaphor when describing his sister?

 

My sister is a pain in the neck.

CORRECT ANSWER
metaphor
EDDIE SAYS
You getting the hang of this? The boy is saying that his sister \'is a pain in the neck\' this is a metaphor. If the example had compared his sister to being like \'a pain in the neck\' it would have been a simile. Keep up the great effort!
  • Question 6

Is this girl using a simile or a metaphor when describing her grandmother?

 

My nanna has a heart of gold.

CORRECT ANSWER
metaphor
EDDIE SAYS
Again the girl is using literal description. This is not a comparison. Her grandmother \'has a heart of gold\'. Of course she doesn\'t literally but the reader is given the idea that she has a good heart. This is a metaphor.
  • Question 7

Read this short passage and decide what the underlined metaphor means.

 

John is on the crest of a wave at the moment. He won first prize in the fancy dress competition and now he's come top in the talent show.

CORRECT ANSWER
John is very successful.
EDDIE SAYS
A tricky one but if you read the whole sentence you can get a good idea to how \'John\' is doing. The metaphor probably refers to surfing. A surfer who is riding the crest of a wave is being successful. There may be a hidden meaning too: a wave eventually flattens out, so the success may not last for ever.
  • Question 8

What do you think the underlined metaphor means this time?

 

James is playing with fire at the moment. He hasn't done any homework for the last week and he was late for school two days running.

CORRECT ANSWER
James is likely to get into trouble.
EDDIE SAYS
Did you get it correct? Playing with fire is very dangerous, and the metaphor can be used for actions that are dangerous or are likely to cause trouble. You got this!
  • Question 9

What do you think the underlined simile means this time?

 

Jake felt like a fish out of water with all the girls at the dance class. He was the only boy there.

CORRECT ANSWER
Jake felt awkward because he was different from the others.
EDDIE SAYS
Super effort! Fish can\'t live out of water so they would feel very uncomfortable!
  • Question 10

What do you think the underlined metaphor means this time?

 

That news is music to my ears!

CORRECT ANSWER
The news pleases me very much.
EDDIE SAYS
High five! Music is generally thought of as pleasant to listen to, so if something is music to your ears it is something that you are glad to hear.
---- OR ----

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