The smart way to improve grades

Comprehensive & curriculum aligned

Affordable pricing from £10/month

Synonyms Practice 2

In this practice exercise, students will identify a pair of synonyms, one from each set of brackets, within timed conditions.

'Synonyms Practice 2' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:  Verbal Reasoning Exam-Style Practice

Curriculum subtopic:  Synonyms

Difficulty level:  

down

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

The following activity is a practice exercise to help you measure your success under timed conditions.

If you are unsure of an answer, move on to the next question.

You should come back to questions you found difficult at the end if you have time.

 

 

Let’s try one together as a reminder:

 

Which of the following are synonyms for apprehensive?

appalled        nervous        critical        anxious        concerned

 

Nervous, anxious and concerned are all synonyms for apprehensive, as they mean the same or a similar thing.

 

 

Now it's time to begin this practice exercise.

Good luck!

Choose one word from each set of brackets to give you a pair of synonyms.

(Garish, Garland, Garnish) (Understated, Unremarkable, Bold)

Choose one word from each set of brackets to give you a pair of synonyms.

(Substitute Subtitle Subordinate) (Inferior Infinite Infallible)

Tick the two words from the six options which are synonyms.

Patriotic

Engaging

Condescending

Contrasting

Encouraging

Patronising

Choose one word from each set of brackets to give you a pair of synonyms.

(Arrogant, Excessive, Meek) (Extraordinary, Diplomatic, Superfluous)

Choose one word from each set of brackets to give you a pair of synonyms.

(Valiant Conceited Consistent) (Concentrated Concealed Vain)

Tick the two words from the six options which are synonyms.

Meagre

Abundance

Sufficient

Capacity

Scanty

Considerable

Choose one word from each set of brackets to give you a pair of synonyms.

(Illegible, Legible, Unreadable) (Decadent, Decorated, Decipherable)

Choose one word from each set of brackets to give you a pair of synonyms.

(Presumptuous Theatrical Prosper) (Thrive Precipice Sinister)

Choose one word from each set of brackets to give you a pair of synonyms.

(Presupposition, Insincere, Conceited) (Indecipherable, Assumption, Predisposition)

Tick the two words from the six options which are synonyms.

Supple

Suppress

Subservient

Subdue

Critical

Criticise

  • Question 1

Choose one word from each set of brackets to give you a pair of synonyms.

CORRECT ANSWER
(Garish, Garland, Garnish) (Understated, Unremarkable, Bold)
EDDIE SAYS
Think carefully about which words you definitely know the meanings of, and use a dictionary to help you if any of these are new words - that's what a good word detective would do! Once you have looked them up, you should see the only adjective is garish so this is the most likely one to match with the words in the second brackets, as they are all adjectives.
Something garish is usually distastefully bright - another word for bright can be bold.
  • Question 2

Choose one word from each set of brackets to give you a pair of synonyms.

CORRECT ANSWER
(Substitute Subtitle Subordinate)
(Inferior Infinite Infallible)
EDDIE SAYS
The prefix 'sub' often suggests that something is second best, or beneath something else - a substitute is second best to the starting team players, and a subtitle is second best to the main title. While suggesting inferiority, neither of them actually means inferior - which leaves us with subordinate.
Have you heard of a subordinate clause in your grammar lessons? It is the inferior clause in many ways - the main clause could create a sentence on its own without needing it, making it second best!
  • Question 3

Tick the two words from the six options which are synonyms.

CORRECT ANSWER
Condescending
Patronising
EDDIE SAYS
We can sort these words into pairs that begin with the same two or three letters, but this doesn\'t tell us anything about their meanings here, so be careful!
If you are patronised, someone makes you feel unimportant, childish, or silly. A person who puts you down in this way is described as condescending (quite the opposite of encouraging!)
  • Question 4

Choose one word from each set of brackets to give you a pair of synonyms.

CORRECT ANSWER
(Arrogant, Excessive, Meek) (Extraordinary, Diplomatic, Superfluous)
EDDIE SAYS
Again, use a dictionary to help you if any of these are new words. This question is reliant on you understanding as many of the options as possible.
If something is superfluous, it is not needed - for example superfluous information is information that you don\'t need because you already have enough. Therefore, this tells us that the synonym we need is excessive, which means that we have more than enough.
  • Question 5

Choose one word from each set of brackets to give you a pair of synonyms.

CORRECT ANSWER
(Valiant Conceited Consistent)
(Concentrated Concealed Vain)
EDDIE SAYS
The words here have very different meanings, so this relies on you being able to understand the words in the first set of brackets - make sure you look them up if you need to!
A conceited person thinks that they are better than everyone else. You might be able to think of some characters in books who are like that - we could also describe them as vain.
  • Question 6

Tick the two words from the six options which are synonyms.

CORRECT ANSWER
Meagre
Scanty
EDDIE SAYS
Quite a mixture of words here but they all relate in some way to quantity. Use your word detecting skills to work out the differences between them!
The largest amount is an abundance, followed by considerable, which means quite a lot. Capacity refers to how much of something a container can hold, while sufficient means that you have just enough of something.
This leaves the two words meagre and scanty which both mean that you have less than enough - in fact very little! So these are our two synonyms.
  • Question 7

Choose one word from each set of brackets to give you a pair of synonyms.

CORRECT ANSWER
(Illegible, Legible, Unreadable) (Decadent, Decorated, Decipherable)
EDDIE SAYS
Again, use a dictionary to help you if any of these are new words.
The first set of words are all to do with writing being readable, or not! Looking at the second set of words, neither of the first two are directly about reading.
However, to decipher something means to work out a code - and if we think of the alphabet as a code to the English language this means that when we are reading we are deciphering. Thus, the synonyms are legible and decipherable because it is possible to read them both!
  • Question 8

Choose one word from each set of brackets to give you a pair of synonyms.

CORRECT ANSWER
(Presumptuous Theatrical Prosper)
(Thrive Precipice Sinister)
EDDIE SAYS
Take your time to think about the definitions here because none of these are actually related words. Remember to use your dictionary if you need to!
Think about what it means if someone is prosperous - it means they are making money or becoming very successful. This is another way of saying they are thriving.
  • Question 9

Choose one word from each set of brackets to give you a pair of synonyms.

CORRECT ANSWER
(Presupposition, Insincere, Conceited)
(Indecipherable, Assumption, Predisposition)
EDDIE SAYS
Ooh there\'s some hard words here, word detective! Think carefully about which words you definitely know the meanings of, and use a dictionary to help you if any of these are new words. Some of these words might look similar to those we have seen earlier in the activity!
Think about the prefix pre - it generally means before. To suppose something before it happens is to assume it - which gives us our synonym pair!
  • Question 10

Tick the two words from the six options which are synonyms.

CORRECT ANSWER
Suppress
Subdue
EDDIE SAYS
We have pairs of word which start very similarly again, but don't let these distract you. Also, don't be tempted to go for critical and criticise just because they come from the same root - one is an adjective and the other is a verb, so they are not synonyms.
If you suppress something, you stop it from becoming bigger. For example, to suppress a scream would be to hold it in or only allow it to come out as a squeak.
The only other word here to do with lessening something is subdue. For example if you quieten down a crying baby, they are subdued.
Terrific word skills!
---- OR ----

Sign up for a £1 trial so you can track and measure your child's progress on this activity.

What is EdPlace?

We're your National Curriculum aligned online education content provider helping each child succeed in English, maths and science from year 1 to GCSE. With an EdPlace account you’ll be able to track and measure progress, helping each child achieve their best. We build confidence and attainment by personalising each child’s learning at a level that suits them.

Start your £1 trial

Start your trial for £1