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11+ Practice Paper in the style of GL English

In this assessment, students will be able to complete a timed 11+ English paper in the style of GL.

'11+ Practice Paper in the style of GL English ' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:  11+ Practice Papers

Curriculum subtopic:  English

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

This is a practice 11+ English paper in the style of a GL assessment.

 

This is a multiple choice assessment.

In the 11+, you may complete your answers on a separate piece of paper or on a computer.

At EdPlace, you will select the correct answer from five options on the computer (a,b,c,d,e).

 

This paper includes a variety of types of English questions.

At the start of each question, there will be a set of instructions which you will need to apply until further instruction.

 

You should work as quickly as possible through the questions.

The timer is set for 50 minutes for this practice paper, although you can keep working after the timer has run out.

This means that you should aim for no more than 1 minute per question and hopefully, as you become more confident, less than 1 minute.

You may find some of the questions difficult.

If you are struggling to answer a question do not waste time on it, but move onto the next question.

 

 

Disclaimer:

We have no affiliation to GL Assessments and these questions represent our own unique content developed by EdPlace 11+ authors.

None of the content displayed here has been supplied by GL or any other third party suppliers.

COMPREHENSION

 

Read the passage below. 

 

For this first section (questions 1 - 27), you will be asked questions to demonstrate your understanding of the text. 

 

 

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Chapter 1

 

1 Alice was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had no pictures or conversations in it, "and what is the use of a book," thought Alice "without pictures or conversation?"

 

2 So she was considering in her own mind (as well as she could, for the hot day made her feel very sleepy and stupid), whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be worth the trouble of getting up and picking the daisies, when suddenly a White Rabbit with pink eyes ran close by her.

 

3 There was nothing so very remarkable in that; nor did Alice think it so very much out of the way to hear the Rabbit say to itself, "Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be late!" (when she thought it over afterwards, it occurred to her that she ought to have wondered at this, but at the time it all seemed quite natural); but when the Rabbit actually took a watch out of its waistcoat-pocket, and looked at it, and then hurried on, Alice started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had never before seen a rabbit with either a waistcoat-pocket, or a watch to take out of it, and burning with curiosity, she ran across the field after it, and fortunately was just in time to see it pop down a large rabbit-hole under the hedge.

 

4 In another moment down went Alice after it, never once considering how in the world she was to get out again.

 

5 The rabbit-hole went straight on like a tunnel for some way and then dipped suddenly down, so suddenly that Alice had not a moment to think about stopping herself before she found herself falling down a very deep well.

 

 

What word best describes Alice's feeling when she's sat on the river bank? 

Euphoric

Restless

Docile

Distraught

Miserable

COMPREHENSION 

 

Read the passage below. 

 

For this first section (questions 1 - 27), you will be asked questions to demonstrate your understanding of the text. 

 

 

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Chapter 1

 

1 Alice was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had no pictures or conversations in it, "and what is the use of a book," thought Alice "without pictures or conversation?"

 

2 So she was considering in her own mind (as well as she could, for the hot day made her feel very sleepy and stupid), whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be worth the trouble of getting up and picking the daisies, when suddenly a White Rabbit with pink eyes ran close by her.

 

3 There was nothing so very remarkable in that; nor did Alice think it so very much out of the way to hear the Rabbit say to itself, "Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be late!" (when she thought it over afterwards, it occurred to her that she ought to have wondered at this, but at the time it all seemed quite natural); but when the Rabbit actually took a watch out of its waistcoat-pocket, and looked at it, and then hurried on, Alice started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had never before seen a rabbit with either a waistcoat-pocket, or a watch to take out of it, and burning with curiosity, she ran across the field after it, and fortunately was just in time to see it pop down a large rabbit-hole under the hedge.

 

In another moment down went Alice after it, never once considering how in the world she was to get out again.

 

5 The rabbit-hole went straight on like a tunnel for some way and then dipped suddenly down, so suddenly that Alice had not a moment to think about stopping herself before she found herself falling down a very deep well.

 

 

What does Alice think about her sister's book?    

It's interesting because it has lively characters.

It's dull because it's full of pictures.

It's amusing because it is well written.

It's hard to understand because it hasn't any pictures.

It's a great book that she has already read.

COMPREHENSION 

 

Read the passage below. 

 

For this first section (questions 1 - 27), you will be asked questions to demonstrate your understanding of the text. 

 

 

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Chapter 1

 

1 Alice was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had no pictures or conversations in it, "and what is the use of a book," thought Alice "without pictures or conversation?"

 

2 So she was considering in her own mind (as well as she could, for the hot day made her feel very sleepy and stupid), whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be worth the trouble of getting up and picking the daisies, when suddenly a White Rabbit with pink eyes ran close by her.

 

3 There was nothing so very remarkable in that; nor did Alice think it so very much out of the way to hear the Rabbit say to itself, "Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be late!" (when she thought it over afterwards, it occurred to her that she ought to have wondered at this, but at the time it all seemed quite natural); but when the Rabbit actually took a watch out of its waistcoat-pocket, and looked at it, and then hurried on, Alice started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had never before seen a rabbit with either a waistcoat-pocket, or a watch to take out of it, and burning with curiosity, she ran across the field after it, and fortunately was just in time to see it pop down a large rabbit-hole under the hedge.

 

4 In another moment down went Alice after it, never once considering how in the world she was to get out again.

 

5 The rabbit-hole went straight on like a tunnel for some way and then dipped suddenly down, so suddenly that Alice had not a moment to think about stopping herself before she found herself falling down a very deep well.

 

 

What has made Alice feel 'sleepy and stupid'? 

Her sister

The weather

The rabbit

The river

The book

COMPREHENSION 

 

Read the passage below. 

 

For this first section (questions 1 - 27), you will be asked questions to demonstrate your understanding of the text. 

 

 

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Chapter 1

 

1 Alice was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had no pictures or conversations in it, "and what is the use of a book," thought Alice "without pictures or conversation?"

 

2 So she was considering in her own mind (as well as she could, for the hot day made her feel very sleepy and stupid), whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be worth the trouble of getting up and picking the daisies, when suddenly a White Rabbit with pink eyes ran close by her.

 

3 There was nothing so very remarkable in that; nor did Alice think it so very much out of the way to hear the Rabbit say to itself, "Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be late!" (when she thought it over afterwards, it occurred to her that she ought to have wondered at this, but at the time it all seemed quite natural); but when the Rabbit actually took a watch out of its waistcoat-pocket, and looked at it, and then hurried on, Alice started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had never before seen a rabbit with either a waistcoat-pocket, or a watch to take out of it, and burning with curiosity, she ran across the field after it, and fortunately was just in time to see it pop down a large rabbit-hole under the hedge.

 

4 In another moment down went Alice after it, never once considering how in the world she was to get out again.

 

5 The rabbit-hole went straight on like a tunnel for some way and then dipped suddenly down, so suddenly that Alice had not a moment to think about stopping herself before she found herself falling down a very deep well.

 

 

Which of the following quotations describes the way in which Alice follows the Rabbit?  

'Nothing so very remarkable'

'Burning with curiosity'

'It flashed across her mind'

'Alice was beginning to get very tired'

'Alice started to her feet'

COMPREHENSION 

 

Read the passage below. 

 

For this first section (questions 1 - 27), you will be asked questions to demonstrate your understanding of the text. 

 

 

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Chapter 1

 

1 Alice was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had no pictures or conversations in it, "and what is the use of a book," thought Alice "without pictures or conversation?"

 

2 So she was considering in her own mind (as well as she could, for the hot day made her feel very sleepy and stupid), whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be worth the trouble of getting up and picking the daisies, when suddenly a White Rabbit with pink eyes ran close by her.

 

3 There was nothing so very remarkable in that; nor did Alice think it so very much out of the way to hear the Rabbit say to itself, "Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be late!" (when she thought it over afterwards, it occurred to her that she ought to have wondered at this, but at the time it all seemed quite natural); but when the Rabbit actually took a watch out of its waistcoat-pocket, and looked at it, and then hurried on, Alice started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had never before seen a rabbit with either a waistcoat-pocket, or a watch to take out of it, and burning with curiosity, she ran across the field after it, and fortunately was just in time to see it pop down a large rabbit-hole under the hedge.

 

4 In another moment down went Alice after it, never once considering how in the world she was to get out again.

 

The rabbit-hole went straight on like a tunnel for some way and then dipped suddenly down, so suddenly that Alice had not a moment to think about stopping herself before she found herself falling down a very deep well.

 

 

In the text, which word suggests how Alice feels when she sees where the Rabbit has gone?

Fortunate

Pleased

Hopeful

Excited

Inspired

COMPREHENSION

 

Read the passage below. 

 

For this first section (questions 1 - 27), you will be asked questions to demonstrate your understanding of the text. 

 

 

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Chapter 1

 

1 Alice was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had no pictures or conversations in it, "and what is the use of a book," thought Alice "without pictures or conversation?"

 

2 So she was considering in her own mind (as well as she could, for the hot day made her feel very sleepy and stupid), whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be worth the trouble of getting up and picking the daisies, when suddenly a White Rabbit with pink eyes ran close by her.

 

3 There was nothing so very remarkable in that; nor did Alice think it so very much out of the way to hear the Rabbit say to itself, "Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be late!" (when she thought it over afterwards, it occurred to her that she ought to have wondered at this, but at the time it all seemed quite natural); but when the Rabbit actually took a watch out of its waistcoat-pocket, and looked at it, and then hurried on, Alice started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had never before seen a rabbit with either a waistcoat-pocket, or a watch to take out of it, and burning with curiosity, she ran across the field after it, and fortunately was just in time to see it pop down a large rabbit-hole under the hedge.

 

4 In another moment down went Alice after it, never once considering how in the world she was to get out again.

 

5 The rabbit-hole went straight on like a tunnel for some way and then dipped suddenly down, so suddenly that Alice had not a moment to think about stopping herself before she found herself falling down a very deep well.

 

 

Which linguistic devise does Carroll use at the end of the first paragraph?

Simile

Metaphor

Rhetorical question

Alliteration

Rhyme

COMPREHENSION 

 

Read the passage below. 

 

For this first section (questions 1 - 27), you will be asked questions to demonstrate your understanding of the text. 

 

 

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Chapter 1

 

1 Alice was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had no pictures or conversations in it, "and what is the use of a book," thought Alice "without pictures or conversation?"

 

2 So she was considering in her own mind (as well as she could, for the hot day made her feel very sleepy and stupid), whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be worth the trouble of getting up and picking the daisies, when suddenly a White Rabbit with pink eyes ran close by her.

 

3 There was nothing so very remarkable in that; nor did Alice think it so very much out of the way to hear the Rabbit say to itself, "Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be late!" (when she thought it over afterwards, it occurred to her that she ought to have wondered at this, but at the time it all seemed quite natural); but when the Rabbit actually took a watch out of its waistcoat-pocket, and looked at it, and then hurried on, Alice started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had never before seen a rabbit with either a waistcoat-pocket, or a watch to take out of it, and burning with curiosity, she ran across the field after it, and fortunately was just in time to see it pop down a large rabbit-hole under the hedge.

 

In another moment down went Alice after it, never once considering how in the world she was to get out again.

 

The rabbit-hole went straight on like a tunnel for some way and then dipped suddenly down, so suddenly that Alice had not a moment to think about stopping herself before she found herself falling down a very deep well.

 

 

In the text, which word suggests how Alice feels when she sees where the Rabbit has gone?

Fortunate

Pleased

Hopeful

Excited

COMPREHENSION 

 

Read the passage below. 

 

For this first section (questions 1- 27), you will be asked questions to demonstrate your understanding of the text. 

 

 

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Chapter 1

 

1 Alice was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had no pictures or conversations in it, "and what is the use of a book," thought Alice "without pictures or conversation?"

 

2 So she was considering in her own mind (as well as she could, for the hot day made her feel very sleepy and stupid), whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be worth the trouble of getting up and picking the daisies, when suddenly a White Rabbit with pink eyes ran close by her.

 

3 There was nothing so very remarkable in that; nor did Alice think it so very much out of the way to hear the Rabbit say to itself, "Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be late!" (when she thought it over afterwards, it occurred to her that she ought to have wondered at this, but at the time it all seemed quite natural); but when the Rabbit actually took a watch out of its waistcoat-pocket, and looked at it, and then hurried on, Alice started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had never before seen a rabbit with either a waistcoat-pocket, or a watch to take out of it, and burning with curiosity, she ran across the field after it, and fortunately was just in time to see it pop down a large rabbit-hole under the hedge.

 

4 In another moment down went Alice after it, never once considering how in the world she was to get out again.

 

5 The rabbit-hole went straight on like a tunnel for some way and then dipped suddenly down, so suddenly that Alice had not a moment to think about stopping herself before she found herself falling down a very deep well.

 

 

What is the purpose of including a rhetorical question in the first paragraph?      

It shows that Alice is very anxious.

Alice does not feel that there is any point talking to her sister.

Alice expects a response from the Rabbit to her question.

It shows the reader what Alice is thinking.

Alice is so sleepy that she doesn't know who she is talking to.

COMPREHENSION 

 

Read the passage below. 

 

For this first section (questions 1 - 27), you will be asked questions to demonstrate your understanding of the text. 

 

 

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Chapter 1

 

1 Alice was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had no pictures or conversations in it, "and what is the use of a book," thought Alice "without pictures or conversation?"

 

2 So she was considering in her own mind (as well as she could, for the hot day made her feel very sleepy and stupid), whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be worth the trouble of getting up and picking the daisies, when suddenly a White Rabbit with pink eyes ran close by her.

 

3 There was nothing so very remarkable in that; nor did Alice think it so very much out of the way to hear the Rabbit say to itself, "Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be late!" (when she thought it over afterwards, it occurred to her that she ought to have wondered at this, but at the time it all seemed quite natural); but when the Rabbit actually took a watch out of its waistcoat-pocket, and looked at it, and then hurried on, Alice started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had never before seen a rabbit with either a waistcoat-pocket, or a watch to take out of it, and burning with curiosity, she ran across the field after it, and fortunately was just in time to see it pop down a large rabbit-hole under the hedge.

 

4 In another moment down went Alice after it, never once considering how in the world she was to get out again.

 

5 The rabbit-hole went straight on like a tunnel for some way and then dipped suddenly down, so suddenly that Alice had not a moment to think about stopping herself before she found herself falling down a very deep well.

 

 

What language does Carroll use to suggest that the Rabbit is in a rush?  

Hurried on

"Oh dear"

Pop down

She ran across the field

It flashed across

COMPREHENSION 

 

Read the passage below. 

 

For this first section (questions 1 - 27), you will be asked questions to demonstrate your understanding of the text. 

 

 

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Chapter 1

 

1 Alice was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had no pictures or conversations in it, "and what is the use of a book," thought Alice "without pictures or conversation?"

 

2 So she was considering in her own mind (as well as she could, for the hot day made her feel very sleepy and stupid), whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be worth the trouble of getting up and picking the daisies, when suddenly a White Rabbit with pink eyes ran close by her.

 

3 There was nothing so very remarkable in that; nor did Alice think it so very much out of the way to hear the Rabbit say to itself, "Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be late!" (when she thought it over afterwards, it occurred to her that she ought to have wondered at this, but at the time it all seemed quite natural); but when the Rabbit actually took a watch out of its waistcoat-pocket, and looked at it, and then hurried on, Alice started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had never before seen a rabbit with either a waistcoat-pocket, or a watch to take out of it, and burning with curiosity, she ran across the field after it, and fortunately was just in time to see it pop down a large rabbit-hole under the hedge.

 

4 In another moment down went Alice after it, never once considering how in the world she was to get out again.

 

5 The rabbit-hole went straight on like a tunnel for some way and then dipped suddenly down, so suddenly that Alice had not a moment to think about stopping herself before she found herself falling down a very deep well.

 

 

Alice could be described as hasty as she follows the rabbit into the rabbit-hole. 

What does she fail to think about?           

How she will tell her sister where she is going.

What time she will get home for tea.

How she will get out again.

How quickly she can run.

Whether the rabbit wants a visitor.

COMPREHENSION 

 

Read the passage below. 

 

For this first section (questions 1 - 27), you will be asked questions to demonstrate your understanding of the text. 

 

 

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Chapter 1

 

1 Alice was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had no pictures or conversations in it, "and what is the use of a book," thought Alice "without pictures or conversation?"

 

2 So she was considering in her own mind (as well as she could, for the hot day made her feel very sleepy and stupid), whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be worth the trouble of getting up and picking the daisies, when suddenly a White Rabbit with pink eyes ran close by her.

 

3 There was nothing so very remarkable in that; nor did Alice think it so very much out of the way to hear the Rabbit say to itself, "Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be late!" (when she thought it over afterwards, it occurred to her that she ought to have wondered at this, but at the time it all seemed quite natural); but when the Rabbit actually took a watch out of its waistcoat-pocket, and looked at it, and then hurried on, Alice started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had never before seen a rabbit with either a waistcoat-pocket, or a watch to take out of it, and burning with curiosity, she ran across the field after it, and fortunately was just in time to see it pop down a large rabbit-hole under the hedge.

 

4 In another moment down went Alice after it, never once considering how in the world she was to get out again.

 

5 The rabbit-hole went straight on like a tunnel for some way and then dipped suddenly down, so suddenly that Alice had not a moment to think about stopping herself before she found herself falling down a very deep well.

 

 

Can you identify the verb in paragraph 2 ?     

Considering

Sleepy

Daisy-chain

Picking

Suddenly

COMPREHENSION 

 

Read the passage below. 

 

For this first section (questions 1 - 27), you will be asked questions to demonstrate your understanding of the text. 

 

 

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Chapter 1

 

1 Alice was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had no pictures or conversations in it, "and what is the use of a book," thought Alice "without pictures or conversation?"

 

2 So she was considering in her own mind (as well as she could, for the hot day made her feel very sleepy and stupid), whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be worth the trouble of getting up and picking the daisies, when suddenly a White Rabbit with pink eyes ran close by her.

 

3 There was nothing so very remarkable in that; nor did Alice think it so very much out of the way to hear the Rabbit say to itself, "Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be late!" (when she thought it over afterwards, it occurred to her that she ought to have wondered at this, but at the time it all seemed quite natural); but when the Rabbit actually took a watch out of its waistcoat-pocket, and looked at it, and then hurried on, Alice started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had never before seen a rabbit with either a waistcoat-pocket, or a watch to take out of it, and burning with curiosity, she ran across the field after it, and fortunately was just in time to see it pop down a large rabbit-hole under the hedge.

 

4 In another moment down went Alice after it, never once considering how in the world she was to get out again.

 

5 The rabbit-hole went straight on like a tunnel for some way and then dipped suddenly down, so suddenly that Alice had not a moment to think about stopping herself before she found herself falling down a very deep well.

 

 

Which word in the list below does NOT have a similar meaning to the word 'remarkable'?

Noteworthy

Exceptional

Disappointing

Momentous

Uncommon

COMPREHENSION 

 

Read the passage below. 

 

For this first section (questions 1 - 27), you will be asked questions to demonstrate your understanding of the text. 

 

 

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Chapter 7

 

1 There was a table set out under a tree in front of the house, and the March Hare and the Hatter were having tea at it: a Dormouse was sitting between them, fast asleep, and the other two were using it as a cushion, resting their elbows on it, and talking over its head. "Very uncomfortable for the Dormouse," thought Alice; "only, as it's asleep, I suppose it doesn't mind."

2 The table was a large one, but the three were all crowded together at one corner of it: "No room! No room!" they cried out when they saw Alice coming. "There's plenty of room!" said Alice indignantly, and she sat down in a large arm-chair at one end of the table.

3 "Have some wine," the March Hare said in an encouraging tone.

4 Alice looked all round the table, but there was nothing on it but tea. "I don't see any wine," she remarked.

5 "There isn't any," said the March Hare.

"Then it wasn't very civil of you to offer it," said Alice angrily.

7 "It wasn't very civil of you to sit down without being invited," said the March Hare.

8 "I didn't know it was your table," said Alice; "it's laid for a great many more than three."

9 "Your hair wants cutting," said the Hatter. He had been looking at Alice for some time with great curiosity, and this was his first speech.

10 "You should learn not to make personal remarks," Alice said with some severity; "it's very rude."

11 The Hatter opened his eyes very wide on hearing this; but all he said was, "Why is a raven like a writing-desk?"

12 "Come, we shall have some fun now!" thought Alice. "I'm glad they've begun asking riddles.--I believe I can guess that," she added aloud.

13 "Do you mean that you think you can find out the answer to it?" said the March Hare.

14 "Exactly so," said Alice.

15 "Then you should say what you mean," the March Hare went on.

16 "I do," Alice hastily replied; "at least--at least I mean what I say--that's the same thing, you know."

17 "Not the same thing a bit!" said the Hatter. "You might just as well say that 'I see what I eat' is the same thing as 'I eat what I see'!"

 

 

What is being used as a cushion in this passage?

Dormouse

Teacup

March Hare

Table

Mad Hatter

COMPREHENSION 

 

Read the passage below.  

 

For this first section (questions 1 - 27), you will be asked questions to demonstrate your understanding of the text. 

 

 

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Chapter 7

 

1 There was a table set out under a tree in front of the house, and the March Hare and the Hatter were having tea at it: a Dormouse was sitting between them, fast asleep, and the other two were using it as a cushion, resting their elbows on it, and talking over its head. "Very uncomfortable for the Dormouse," thought Alice; "only, as it's asleep, I suppose it doesn't mind."

2 The table was a large one, but the three were all crowded together at one corner of it: "No room! No room!" they cried out when they saw Alice coming. "There's plenty of room!" said Alice indignantly, and she sat down in a large arm-chair at one end of the table.

3 "Have some wine," the March Hare said in an encouraging tone.

4 Alice looked all round the table, but there was nothing on it but tea. "I don't see any wine," she remarked.

5 "There isn't any," said the March Hare.

6 "Then it wasn't very civil of you to offer it," said Alice angrily.

7 "It wasn't very civil of you to sit down without being invited," said the March Hare.

8 "I didn't know it was your table," said Alice; "it's laid for a great many more than three."

9 "Your hair wants cutting," said the Hatter. He had been looking at Alice for some time with great curiosity, and this was his first speech.

10 "You should learn not to make personal remarks," Alice said with some severity; "it's very rude."

11 The Hatter opened his eyes very wide on hearing this; but all he said was, "Why is a raven like a writing-desk?"

12 "Come, we shall have some fun now!" thought Alice. "I'm glad they've begun asking riddles.--I believe I can guess that," she added aloud.

13 "Do you mean that you think you can find out the answer to it?" said the March Hare.

14 "Exactly so," said Alice.

15 "Then you should say what you mean," the March Hare went on.

16 "I do," Alice hastily replied; "at least--at least I mean what I say--that's the same thing, you know."

17 "Not the same thing a bit!" said the Hatter. "You might just as well say that 'I see what I eat' is the same thing as 'I eat what I see'!"

 

 

Who is first to speak to Alice when she sits down in this passage?

Dormouse

Cheshire Cat

March Hare

Rabbit

Mad Hatter

COMPREHENSION 

 

Read the passage below.  

 

For this first section (questions 1 - 27), you will be asked questions to demonstrate your understanding of the text. 

 

 

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Chapter 7

 

1 There was a table set out under a tree in front of the house, and the March Hare and the Hatter were having tea at it: a Dormouse was sitting between them, fast asleep, and the other two were using it as a cushion, resting their elbows on it, and talking over its head. "Very uncomfortable for the Dormouse," thought Alice; "only, as it's asleep, I suppose it doesn't mind."

2 The table was a large one, but the three were all crowded together at one corner of it: "No room! No room!" they cried out when they saw Alice coming. "There's plenty of room!" said Alice indignantly, and she sat down in a large arm-chair at one end of the table.

3 "Have some wine," the March Hare said in an encouraging tone.

4 Alice looked all round the table, but there was nothing on it but tea. "I don't see any wine," she remarked.

5 "There isn't any," said the March Hare.

6 "Then it wasn't very civil of you to offer it," said Alice angrily.

7 "It wasn't very civil of you to sit down without being invited," said the March Hare.

8 "I didn't know it was your table," said Alice; "it's laid for a great many more than three."

9 "Your hair wants cutting," said the Hatter. He had been looking at Alice for some time with great curiosity, and this was his first speech.

10 "You should learn not to make personal remarks," Alice said with some severity; "it's very rude."

11 The Hatter opened his eyes very wide on hearing this; but all he said was, "Why is a raven like a writing-desk?"

12 "Come, we shall have some fun now!" thought Alice. "I'm glad they've begun asking riddles.--I believe I can guess that," she added aloud.

13 "Do you mean that you think you can find out the answer to it?" said the March Hare.

14 "Exactly so," said Alice.

15 "Then you should say what you mean," the March Hare went on.

16 "I do," Alice hastily replied; "at least--at least I mean what I say--that's the same thing, you know."

17 "Not the same thing a bit!" said the Hatter. "You might just as well say that 'I see what I eat' is the same thing as 'I eat what I see'!"

 

 

Why is Alice indignant?

She feels sorry for the Dormouse.

There is not enough food.

There is not a chair for her.

There is plenty of space but she is told "No room".

The Mad Hatter has run out of tea.

COMPREHENSION 

 

Read the passage below.  

 

For this first section (questions 1 - 27), you will be asked questions to demonstrate your understanding of the text. 

 

 

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Chapter 7

 

1 There was a table set out under a tree in front of the house, and the March Hare and the Hatter were having tea at it: a Dormouse was sitting between them, fast asleep, and the other two were using it as a cushion, resting their elbows on it, and talking over its head. "Very uncomfortable for the Dormouse," thought Alice; "only, as it's asleep, I suppose it doesn't mind."

2 The table was a large one, but the three were all crowded together at one corner of it: "No room! No room!" they cried out when they saw Alice coming. "There's plenty of room!" said Alice indignantly, and she sat down in a large arm-chair at one end of the table.

3 "Have some wine," the March Hare said in an encouraging tone.

4 Alice looked all round the table, but there was nothing on it but tea. "I don't see any wine," she remarked.

5 "There isn't any," said the March Hare.

6 "Then it wasn't very civil of you to offer it," said Alice angrily.

7 "It wasn't very civil of you to sit down without being invited," said the March Hare.

8 "I didn't know it was your table," said Alice; "it's laid for a great many more than three."

9 "Your hair wants cutting," said the Hatter. He had been looking at Alice for some time with great curiosity, and this was his first speech.

10 "You should learn not to make personal remarks," Alice said with some severity; "it's very rude."

11 The Hatter opened his eyes very wide on hearing this; but all he said was, "Why is a raven like a writing-desk?"

12 "Come, we shall have some fun now!" thought Alice. "I'm glad they've begun asking riddles.--I believe I can guess that," she added aloud.

13 "Do you mean that you think you can find out the answer to it?" said the March Hare.

14 "Exactly so," said Alice.

15 "Then you should say what you mean," the March Hare went on.

16 "I do," Alice hastily replied; "at least--at least I mean what I say--that's the same thing, you know."

17 "Not the same thing a bit!" said the Hatter. "You might just as well say that 'I see what I eat' is the same thing as 'I eat what I see'!"

 

 

What does Alice mean when she uses the phrase "it wasn't very civil" in line 6?

It was welcoming.

It was impolite.

It was very helpful.

It was polite.

It was considerate.

COMPREHENSION 

 

Read the passage below.  

 

For this first section (questions 1 - 27), you will be asked questions to demonstrate your understanding of the text. 

 

 

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Chapter 7

 

1 There was a table set out under a tree in front of the house, and the March Hare and the Hatter were having tea at it: a Dormouse was sitting between them, fast asleep, and the other two were using it as a cushion, resting their elbows on it, and talking over its head. "Very uncomfortable for the Dormouse," thought Alice; "only, as it's asleep, I suppose it doesn't mind."

2 The table was a large one, but the three were all crowded together at one corner of it: "No room! No room!" they cried out when they saw Alice coming. "There's plenty of room!" said Alice indignantly, and she sat down in a large arm-chair at one end of the table.

3 "Have some wine," the March Hare said in an encouraging tone.

4 Alice looked all round the table, but there was nothing on it but tea. "I don't see any wine," she remarked.

5 "There isn't any," said the March Hare.

6 "Then it wasn't very civil of you to offer it," said Alice angrily.

7 "It wasn't very civil of you to sit down without being invited," said the March Hare.

8 "I didn't know it was your table," said Alice; "it's laid for a great many more than three."

9 "Your hair wants cutting," said the Hatter. He had been looking at Alice for some time with great curiosity, and this was his first speech.

10 "You should learn not to make personal remarks," Alice said with some severity; "it's very rude."

11 The Hatter opened his eyes very wide on hearing this; but all he said was, "Why is a raven like a writing-desk?"

12 "Come, we shall have some fun now!" thought Alice. "I'm glad they've begun asking riddles.--I believe I can guess that," she added aloud.

13 "Do you mean that you think you can find out the answer to it?" said the March Hare.

14 "Exactly so," said Alice.

15 "Then you should say what you mean," the March Hare went on.

16 "I do," Alice hastily replied; "at least--at least I mean what I say--that's the same thing, you know."

17 "Not the same thing a bit!" said the Hatter. "You might just as well say that 'I see what I eat' is the same thing as 'I eat what I see'!"

 

 

In line 17, Carroll uses a literary device.

Which one do you see in action here?

Similie

Personification

Alliteration

Imagery

Monosyllabic sentence

COMPREHENSION 

 

Read the passage below.  

 

For this first section (questions 1 - 27), you will be asked questions to demonstrate your understanding of the text. 

 

 

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Chapter 7

 

1 There was a table set out under a tree in front of the house, and the March Hare and the Hatter were having tea at it: a Dormouse was sitting between them, fast asleep, and the other two were using it as a cushion, resting their elbows on it, and talking over its head. "Very uncomfortable for the Dormouse," thought Alice; "only, as it's asleep, I suppose it doesn't mind."

2 The table was a large one, but the three were all crowded together at one corner of it: "No room! No room!" they cried out when they saw Alice coming. "There's plenty of room!" said Alice indignantly, and she sat down in a large arm-chair at one end of the table.

3 "Have some wine," the March Hare said in an encouraging tone.

4 Alice looked all round the table, but there was nothing on it but tea. "I don't see any wine," she remarked.

5 "There isn't any," said the March Hare.

6 "Then it wasn't very civil of you to offer it," said Alice angrily.

7 "It wasn't very civil of you to sit down without being invited," said the March Hare.

8 "I didn't know it was your table," said Alice; "it's laid for a great many more than three."

9 "Your hair wants cutting," said the Hatter. He had been looking at Alice for some time with great curiosity, and this was his first speech.

10 "You should learn not to make personal remarks," Alice said with some severity; "it's very rude."

11 The Hatter opened his eyes very wide on hearing this; but all he said was, "Why is a raven like a writing-desk?"

12 "Come, we shall have some fun now!" thought Alice. "I'm glad they've begun asking riddles.--I believe I can guess that," she added aloud.

13 "Do you mean that you think you can find out the answer to it?" said the March Hare.

14 "Exactly so," said Alice.

15 "Then you should say what you mean," the March Hare went on.

16 "I do," Alice hastily replied; "at least--at least I mean what I say--that's the same thing, you know."

17 "Not the same thing a bit!" said the Hatter. "You might just as well say that 'I see what I eat' is the same thing as 'I eat what I see'!"

 

 

What does the sentence 'Alice said with some severity' mean?

Alice is speaking thoughtfully.

Alice is speaking firmly.

Alice is speaking shyly.

Alice is speaking sleepily.

Alice is speaking enthusiastically.

COMPREHENSION 

 

Read the passage below.  

 

For this first section (questions 1 - 27), you will be asked questions to demonstrate your understanding of the text. 

 

 

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Chapter 7

 

1 There was a table set out under a tree in front of the house, and the March Hare and the Hatter were having tea at it: a Dormouse was sitting between them, fast asleep, and the other two were using it as a cushion, resting their elbows on it, and talking over its head. "Very uncomfortable for the Dormouse," thought Alice; "only, as it's asleep, I suppose it doesn't mind."

2 The table was a large one, but the three were all crowded together at one corner of it: "No room! No room!" they cried out when they saw Alice coming. "There's plenty of room!" said Alice indignantly, and she sat down in a large arm-chair at one end of the table.

3 "Have some wine," the March Hare said in an encouraging tone.

4 Alice looked all round the table, but there was nothing on it but tea. "I don't see any wine," she remarked.

5 "There isn't any," said the March Hare.

6 "Then it wasn't very civil of you to offer it," said Alice angrily.

7 "It wasn't very civil of you to sit down without being invited," said the March Hare.

8 "I didn't know it was your table," said Alice; "it's laid for a great many more than three."

9 "Your hair wants cutting," said the Hatter. He had been looking at Alice for some time with great curiosity, and this was his first speech.

10 "You should learn not to make personal remarks," Alice said with some severity; "it's very rude."

11 The Hatter opened his eyes very wide on hearing this; but all he said was, "Why is a raven like a writing-desk?"

12 "Come, we shall have some fun now!" thought Alice. "I'm glad they've begun asking riddles.--I believe I can guess that," she added aloud.

13 "Do you mean that you think you can find out the answer to it?" said the March Hare.

14 "Exactly so," said Alice.

15 "Then you should say what you mean," the March Hare went on.

16 "I do," Alice hastily replied; "at least--at least I mean what I say--that's the same thing, you know."

17 "Not the same thing a bit!" said the Hatter. "You might just as well say that 'I see what I eat' is the same thing as 'I eat what I see'!"

 

 

Why is the 'Mad Hatter' a good name to describe the Hatter's characteristics?

He makes hats.

He likes to wear a hat while he eats tea.

He is an eccentric hatter who is hard to understand.

It sounds interesting.

Carroll could imagine what the character would look like.

COMPREHENSION 

 

Read the passage below.  

 

For this first section (questions 1 - 27), you will be asked questions to demonstrate your understanding of the text. 

 

 

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Chapter 7

 

1 There was a table set out under a tree in front of the house, and the March Hare and the Hatter were having tea at it: a Dormouse was sitting between them, fast asleep, and the other two were using it as a cushion, resting their elbows on it, and talking over its head. "Very uncomfortable for the Dormouse," thought Alice; "only, as it's asleep, I suppose it doesn't mind."

2 The table was a large one, but the three were all crowded together at one corner of it: "No room! No room!" they cried out when they saw Alice coming. "There's plenty of room!" said Alice indignantly, and she sat down in a large arm-chair at one end of the table.

3 "Have some wine," the March Hare said in an encouraging tone.

4 Alice looked all round the table, but there was nothing on it but tea. "I don't see any wine," she remarked.

5 "There isn't any," said the March Hare.

6 "Then it wasn't very civil of you to offer it," said Alice angrily.

7 "It wasn't very civil of you to sit down without being invited," said the March Hare.

8 "I didn't know it was your table," said Alice; "it's laid for a great many more than three."

9 "Your hair wants cutting," said the Hatter. He had been looking at Alice for some time with great curiosity, and this was his first speech.

10 "You should learn not to make personal remarks," Alice said with some severity; "it's very rude."

11 The Hatter opened his eyes very wide on hearing this; but all he said was, "Why is a raven like a writing-desk?"

12 "Come, we shall have some fun now!" thought Alice. "I'm glad they've begun asking riddles.--I believe I can guess that," she added aloud.

13 "Do you mean that you think you can find out the answer to it?" said the March Hare.

14 "Exactly so," said Alice.

15 "Then you should say what you mean," the March Hare went on.

16 "I do," Alice hastily replied; "at least--at least I mean what I say--that's the same thing, you know."

17 "Not the same thing a bit!" said the Hatter. "You might just as well say that 'I see what I eat' is the same thing as 'I eat what I see'!"

 

 

Which of the words below means the same as curiosity?

Inquisitiveness

Controlling

Muddled

Perplexing

Concerning

COMPREHENSION 

 

Read the passage below.  

 

For this first section (questions 1 - 27), you will be asked questions to demonstrate your understanding of the text. 

 

 

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Chapter 7

 

1 There was a table set out under a tree in front of the house, and the March Hare and the Hatter were having tea at it: a Dormouse was sitting between them, fast asleep, and the other two were using it as a cushion, resting their elbows on it, and talking over its head. "Very uncomfortable for the Dormouse," thought Alice; "only, as it's asleep, I suppose it doesn't mind."

2 The table was a large one, but the three were all crowded together at one corner of it: "No room! No room!" they cried out when they saw Alice coming. "There's plenty of room!" said Alice indignantly, and she sat down in a large arm-chair at one end of the table.

3 "Have some wine," the March Hare said in an encouraging tone.

4 Alice looked all round the table, but there was nothing on it but tea. "I don't see any wine," she remarked.

5 "There isn't any," said the March Hare.

6 "Then it wasn't very civil of you to offer it," said Alice angrily.

7 "It wasn't very civil of you to sit down without being invited," said the March Hare.

8 "I didn't know it was your table," said Alice; "it's laid for a great many more than three."

9 "Your hair wants cutting," said the Hatter. He had been looking at Alice for some time with great curiosity, and this was his first speech.

10 "You should learn not to make personal remarks," Alice said with some severity; "it's very rude."

11 The Hatter opened his eyes very wide on hearing this; but all he said was, "Why is a raven like a writing-desk?"

12 "Come, we shall have some fun now!" thought Alice. "I'm glad they've begun asking riddles.--I believe I can guess that," she added aloud.

13 "Do you mean that you think you can find out the answer to it?" said the March Hare.

14 "Exactly so," said Alice.

15 "Then you should say what you mean," the March Hare went on.

16 "I do," Alice hastily replied; "at least--at least I mean what I say--that's the same thing, you know."

17 "Not the same thing a bit!" said the Hatter. "You might just as well say that 'I see what I eat' is the same thing as 'I eat what I see'!"

 

 

Carroll uses repetition twice in this passage of text.

This is included for different impact.

When the March Hare, Mad Hatter and Dormouse shout "No room! No room!", it is to tell Alice emphatically that she is not welcome. 

 

When Alice uses repetition in line 16, what is the impact?

To show that Alice is angry.

To show that Alice is happy.

To show that Alice is becoming confused by her conversation with the Mad Hatter.

To show that Alice has a lot of sympathy for the Dormouse.

To show that Alice is not being heard.

COMPREHENSION 

 

Read the passage below.  

 

For this first section (questions 1 - 27), you will be asked questions to demonstrate your understanding of the text. 

 

 

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Chapter 7

 

1 There was a table set out under a tree in front of the house, and the March Hare and the Hatter were having tea at it: a Dormouse was sitting between them, fast asleep, and the other two were using it as a cushion, resting their elbows on it, and talking over its head. "Very uncomfortable for the Dormouse," thought Alice; "only, as it's asleep, I suppose it doesn't mind."

2 The table was a large one, but the three were all crowded together at one corner of it: "No room! No room!" they cried out when they saw Alice coming. "There's plenty of room!" said Alice indignantly, and she sat down in a large arm-chair at one end of the table.

3 "Have some wine," the March Hare said in an encouraging tone.

4 Alice looked all round the table, but there was nothing on it but tea. "I don't see any wine," she remarked.

5 "There isn't any," said the March Hare.

6 "Then it wasn't very civil of you to offer it," said Alice angrily.

7 "It wasn't very civil of you to sit down without being invited," said the March Hare.

8 "I didn't know it was your table," said Alice; "it's laid for a great many more than three."

9 "Your hair wants cutting," said the Hatter. He had been looking at Alice for some time with great curiosity, and this was his first speech.

10 "You should learn not to make personal remarks," Alice said with some severity; "it's very rude."

11 The Hatter opened his eyes very wide on hearing this; but all he said was, "Why is a raven like a writing-desk?"

12 "Come, we shall have some fun now!" thought Alice. "I'm glad they've begun asking riddles.--I believe I can guess that," she added aloud.

13 "Do you mean that you think you can find out the answer to it?" said the March Hare.

14 "Exactly so," said Alice.

15 "Then you should say what you mean," the March Hare went on.

16 "I do," Alice hastily replied; "at least--at least I mean what I say--that's the same thing, you know."

17 "Not the same thing a bit!" said the Hatter. "You might just as well say that 'I see what I eat' is the same thing as 'I eat what I see'!"

 

 

In the quote, '"Then it wasn't very civil of you to offer it," said Alice angrily.' which word is the adverb?

Wasn't

Very

Civil

Offer

Angrily

COMPREHENSION 

 

Read the passage below.  

 

For this first section (questions 1 - 27), you will be asked questions to demonstrate your understanding of the text. 

 

 

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Chapter 7

 

1 There was a table set out under a tree in front of the house, and the March Hare and the Hatter were having tea at it: a Dormouse was sitting between them, fast asleep, and the other two were using it as a cushion, resting their elbows on it, and talking over its head. "Very uncomfortable for the Dormouse," thought Alice; "only, as it's asleep, I suppose it doesn't mind."

2 The table was a large one, but the three were all crowded together at one corner of it: "No room! No room!" they cried out when they saw Alice coming. "There's plenty of room!" said Alice indignantly, and she sat down in a large arm-chair at one end of the table.

3 "Have some wine," the March Hare said in an encouraging tone.

Alice looked all round the table, but there was nothing on it but tea. "I don't see any wine," she remarked.

5 "There isn't any," said the March Hare.

6 "Then it wasn't very civil of you to offer it," said Alice angrily.

7 "It wasn't very civil of you to sit down without being invited," said the March Hare.

8 "I didn't know it was your table," said Alice; "it's laid for a great many more than three."

9 "Your hair wants cutting," said the Hatter. He had been looking at Alice for some time with great curiosity, and this was his first speech.

10 "You should learn not to make personal remarks," Alice said with some severity; "it's very rude."

11 The Hatter opened his eyes very wide on hearing this; but all he said was, "Why is a raven like a writing-desk?"

12 "Come, we shall have some fun now!" thought Alice. "I'm glad they've begun asking riddles.--I believe I can guess that," she added aloud.

13 "Do you mean that you think you can find out the answer to it?" said the March Hare.

14 "Exactly so," said Alice.

15 "Then you should say what you mean," the March Hare went on.

16 "I do," Alice hastily replied; "at least--at least I mean what I say--that's the same thing, you know."

17 "Not the same thing a bit!" said the Hatter. "You might just as well say that 'I see what I eat' is the same thing as 'I eat what I see'!"

 

 

Carroll uses a lot of contractions in this passage. 

Which of the examples below shows the correct use of a contraction?

Its raining.

They're are a lot of people.

He didnt know that...

Shallnt you go to the park.

He's going outside.

COMPREHENSION 

Read the passage below.  

For this first section (questions 1 - 27), you will be asked questions to demonstrate your understanding of the text. 

 

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Chapter 7

 

1 There was a table set out under a tree in front of the house, and the March Hare and the Hatter were having tea at it: a Dormouse was sitting between them, fast asleep, and the other two were using it as a cushion, resting their elbows on it, and talking over its head. "Very uncomfortable for the Dormouse," thought Alice; "only, as it's asleep, I suppose it doesn't mind."

2 The table was a large one, but the three were all crowded together at one corner of it: "No room! No room!" they cried out when they saw Alice coming. "There's plenty of room!" said Alice indignantly, and she sat down in a large arm-chair at one end of the table.

3 "Have some wine," the March Hare said in an encouraging tone.

4 Alice looked all round the table, but there was nothing on it but tea. "I don't see any wine," she remarked.

5 "There isn't any," said the March Hare.

6 "Then it wasn't very civil of you to offer it," said Alice angrily.

7 "It wasn't very civil of you to sit down without being invited," said the March Hare.

8 "I didn't know it was your table," said Alice; "it's laid for a great many more than three."

9 "Your hair wants cutting," said the Hatter. He had been looking at Alice for some time with great curiosity, and this was his first speech.

10 "You should learn not to make personal remarks," Alice said with some severity; "it's very rude."

11 The Hatter opened his eyes very wide on hearing this; but all he said was, "Why is a raven like a writing-desk?"

12 "Come, we shall have some fun now!" thought Alice. "I'm glad they've begun asking riddles.--I believe I can guess that," she added aloud.

13 "Do you mean that you think you can find out the answer to it?" said the March Hare.

14 "Exactly so," said Alice.

15 "Then you should say what you mean," the March Hare went on.

16 "I do," Alice hastily replied; "at least--at least I mean what I say--that's the same thing, you know."

17 "Not the same thing a bit!" said the Hatter. "You might just as well say that 'I see what I eat' is the same thing as 'I eat what I see'!"

 

 

In this passage, there is a lot of speech that is one line long by the different characters. 

 

What is the effect of this on the reader?

It makes it difficult to understand who is speaking.

It makes the reader increase the pace so that it reflects the quick exchange at the table.

It slows the passage down so that there are long pauses between what the characters say.

It is because Carroll did not like to use long sentences in his work.

It makes the reader shout the lines out loudly when they read it.

COMPREHENSION 

 

Read the passage below.  

 

For this first section (questions 1 - 27), you will be asked questions to demonstrate your understanding of the text. 

 

 

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Chapter 7

 

1 There was a table set out under a tree in front of the house, and the March Hare and the Hatter were having tea at it: a Dormouse was sitting between them, fast asleep, and the other two were using it as a cushion, resting their elbows on it, and talking over its head. "Very uncomfortable for the Dormouse," thought Alice; "only, as it's asleep, I suppose it doesn't mind."

2 The table was a large one, but the three were all crowded together at one corner of it: "No room! No room!" they cried out when they saw Alice coming. "There's plenty of room!" said Alice indignantly, and she sat down in a large arm-chair at one end of the table.

3 "Have some wine," the March Hare said in an encouraging tone.

4 Alice looked all round the table, but there was nothing on it but tea. "I don't see any wine," she remarked.

5 "There isn't any," said the March Hare.

6 "Then it wasn't very civil of you to offer it," said Alice angrily.

7 "It wasn't very civil of you to sit down without being invited," said the March Hare.

8 "I didn't know it was your table," said Alice; "it's laid for a great many more than three."

9 "Your hair wants cutting," said the Hatter. He had been looking at Alice for some time with great curiosity, and this was his first speech.

10 "You should learn not to make personal remarks," Alice said with some severity; "it's very rude."

11 The Hatter opened his eyes very wide on hearing this; but all he said was, "Why is a raven like a writing-desk?"

12 "Come, we shall have some fun now!" thought Alice. "I'm glad they've begun asking riddles.--I believe I can guess that," she added aloud.

13 "Do you mean that you think you can find out the answer to it?" said the March Hare.

14 "Exactly so," said Alice.

15 "Then you should say what you mean," the March Hare went on.

16 "I do," Alice hastily replied; "at least--at least I mean what I say--that's the same thing, you know."

17 "Not the same thing a bit!" said the Hatter. "You might just as well say that 'I see what I eat' is the same thing as 'I eat what I see'!"

 

 

In line 16, can you identify the noun?

'I'

'Alice'

'Hastily'

'Mean'

'Same'

COMPREHENSION 

 

Read the passage below.  

 

For this first section (questions 1 - 27), you will be asked questions to demonstrate your understanding of the text. 

 

 

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Chapter 7

 

1 There was a table set out under a tree in front of the house, and the March Hare and the Hatter were having tea at it: a Dormouse was sitting between them, fast asleep, and the other two were using it as a cushion, resting their elbows on it, and talking over its head. "Very uncomfortable for the Dormouse," thought Alice; "only, as it's asleep, I suppose it doesn't mind."

2 The table was a large one, but the three were all crowded together at one corner of it: "No room! No room!" they cried out when they saw Alice coming. "There's plenty of room!" said Alice indignantly, and she sat down in a large arm-chair at one end of the table.

3 "Have some wine," the March Hare said in an encouraging tone.

4 Alice looked all round the table, but there was nothing on it but tea. "I don't see any wine," she remarked.

5 "There isn't any," said the March Hare.

6 "Then it wasn't very civil of you to offer it," said Alice angrily.

7 "It wasn't very civil of you to sit down without being invited," said the March Hare.

8 "I didn't know it was your table," said Alice; "it's laid for a great many more than three."

9 "Your hair wants cutting," said the Hatter. He had been looking at Alice for some time with great curiosity, and this was his first speech.

10 "You should learn not to make personal remarks," Alice said with some severity; "it's very rude."

11 The Hatter opened his eyes very wide on hearing this; but all he said was, "Why is a raven like a writing-desk?"

12 "Come, we shall have some fun now!" thought Alice. "I'm glad they've begun asking riddles.--I believe I can guess that," she added aloud.

13 "Do you mean that you think you can find out the answer to it?" said the March Hare.

14 "Exactly so," said Alice.

15 "Then you should say what you mean," the March Hare went on.

16 "I do," Alice hastily replied; "at least--at least I mean what I say--that's the same thing, you know."

17 "Not the same thing a bit!" said the Hatter. "You might just as well say that 'I see what I eat' is the same thing as 'I eat what I see'!"

 

 

Throughout the passage, we get to know some of the characters better. 

Which character is the most antagonistic towards Alice?

March Hare

Mad Hatter

Dormouse

Sister

White Rabbit

COMPREHENSION 

 

Read the passage below.  

 

For this first section (questions 1 - 27), you will be asked questions to demonstrate your understanding of the text. 

 

 

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Chapter 7

 

1 There was a table set out under a tree in front of the house, and the March Hare and the Hatter were having tea at it: a Dormouse was sitting between them, fast asleep, and the other two were using it as a cushion, resting their elbows on it, and talking over its head. "Very uncomfortable for the Dormouse," thought Alice; "only, as it's asleep, I suppose it doesn't mind."

2 The table was a large one, but the three were all crowded together at one corner of it: "No room! No room!" they cried out when they saw Alice coming. "There's plenty of room!" said Alice indignantly, and she sat down in a large arm-chair at one end of the table.

3 "Have some wine," the March Hare said in an encouraging tone.

4 Alice looked all round the table, but there was nothing on it but tea. "I don't see any wine," she remarked.

5 "There isn't any," said the March Hare.

6 "Then it wasn't very civil of you to offer it," said Alice angrily.

7 "It wasn't very civil of you to sit down without being invited," said the March Hare.

8 "I didn't know it was your table," said Alice; "it's laid for a great many more than three."

9 "Your hair wants cutting," said the Hatter. He had been looking at Alice for some time with great curiosity, and this was his first speech.

10 "You should learn not to make personal remarks," Alice said with some severity; "it's very rude."

11 The Hatter opened his eyes very wide on hearing this; but all he said was, "Why is a raven like a writing-desk?"

12 "Come, we shall have some fun now!" thought Alice. "I'm glad they've begun asking riddles.--I believe I can guess that," she added aloud.

13 "Do you mean that you think you can find out the answer to it?" said the March Hare.

14 "Exactly so," said Alice.

15 "Then you should say what you mean," the March Hare went on.

16 "I do," Alice hastily replied; "at least--at least I mean what I say--that's the same thing, you know."

17 "Not the same thing a bit!" said the Hatter. "You might just as well say that 'I see what I eat' is the same thing as 'I eat what I see'!"

 

 

Alice is excited about the 'riddle'.

Which of the options below explains what a riddle is in the context here?

A person who is known to remove problems.

Someone who plays the violin.

A super-villain in a comic.

To be full of something i.e riddled with errors.

A type of poem that looks like a puzzle.

PUNCTUATION

For questions 28 - 35, you will need to read through the sentence below and identify whether or not each section contains a punctuation error.  

 

Identify where it occurs in the sentence using the labels A, B, C or D, as shown above the sentence.

 

 

A B C D
I wont go  to the supermarket this  morning because I don't have enough time.
A

B

C

D

There are no punctuation errors.

PUNCTUATION

For questions 28 - 35 you will need to read through the sentence below and identify whether or not each section contains a punctuation error.

  

Identify where it occurs in the sentence using the labels A, B, C or D, as shown above the sentence.

 

A B C D
Molly asked, Grandma, is it  ok to take Rex  for a walk?"
A

B

C

D

There are no punctuation errors.

PUNCTUATION

For questions 28 - 35 you will need to read through the sentence below and identify whether or not each section contains a punctuation error.  

 

Identify where it occurs in the sentence using the labels A, B, C or D, as shown above the sentence.

 

A B C D
Claire had football  training on a Monday, Tuesday Wednesday and Thursday.
A

B

C

D

There are no punctuation errors.

PUNCTUATION

For questions 28 - 35 you will need to read through the sentence below and identify whether or not each section contains a punctuation error.  

 

Identify where it occurs in the sentence using the labels A, B, C or D, as shown above the sentence.

 

A B C D
Thomas and his  friends went to the cinema to watch the  latest superhero film

 

A

B

C

D

There are no punctuation errors.

PUNCTUATION

For questions 28 - 35 you will need to read through the sentence below and identify whether or not each section contains a punctuation error.  

 

Identify where it occurs in the sentence using the labels A, B, C or D, as shown above the sentence.

 

A B C D
Mrs. Taylors class were being particularly noisy on Wednesday  following the assembly.

 

A

B

C

D

There are no punctuation errors.

PUNCTUATION

For questions 28 - 35, you will need to read through the sentence below and identify whether or not each section contains a punctuation error.  

 

Identify where it occurs in the sentence using the labels A, B, C or D, as shown above the sentence.

 

A B C D
Did you know that the clocks will change in two weeks.
A

B

C

D

There are no punctuation errors.

PUNCTUATION

For questions 28 - 35, you will need to read through the sentence below and identify whether or not each section contains a punctuation error.  

 

Identify where it occurs in the sentence using the labels A, B, C or D, as shown above the sentence.

 

A B C D
It was a  blustery day on the  farm and all of the  cows were lying down.
A

B

C

D

There are no punctuation errors.

PUNCTUATION

For questions 28 - 35, you will need to read through the sentence below and identify whether or not each section contains a punctuation error.  

 

Identify where it occurs in the sentence using the labels A, B, C or D, as shown above the sentence.

 

A B C D
Jenny (my friend that lives next door has said that we can take her dog  for a walk tomorrow.
A

B

C

D

There are no punctuation errors.

SPELLING 

(Sentence taken from Cinderella by the Grim Brothers)

 

For questions 36 - 43, you will need to read through the sentence below and identify whether or not it contains a spelling error. 

 

If you believe there is an error, you should identify where it occurs using the sections A, B, C or D as shown above the sentence.

 

A B C D
The woman  had brought with her  into the house  too daughters,
A

B

C

D

There are no spelling errors.

SPELLING 

(Sentence taken from Cinderella by The Grim Brothers

 

For questions 36 - 43, you will need to read through the sentence below and identify whether or not it contains a spelling error. 

 

If you believe there is an error, you should identify where it occurs using the sections A, B, C or D as shown above the sentence.

 

A B C D
who were beautiful  and fair of face,  but vyle and black of heart. 
A

B

C

D

There are no spelling errors.

SPELLING  

(Sentence taken from Cinderella by The Grim Brothers)

 

For questions 36 - 43, you will need to read through the sentence below and identify whether or not it contains a spelling error. 

 

If you believe there is an error, you should identify where it occurs using the sections A, B, C or D as shown above the sentence.

 

A B C D
Now began  a bad  time for the poor  step-child.
A

B

C

D

There are no spelling errors.

SPELLING 

(Sentence taken from Cinderella by The Grim Brothers)

 

For questions 36 - 43, you will need to read through the sentence below and identify whether or not it contains a spelling error. 

 

If you believe there is an error, you should identify where it occurs using the sections A, B, C or D as shown the sentence.

 

A B C D
"Is the stupid  goose to sit  in the parlor with us?"  they said.
A

B

C

D

There are no spelling errors.

SPELLING 

(Sentence taken from Cinderella by The Grim Brothers)

 

For questions 36 - 43, you will need to read through the sentence below and identify whether or not it contains a spelling error. 

 

If you believe there is an error, you should identify where it occurs using the sections A, B, C or D as shown above the sentence.

 

A B C D
They took her pretty clothes,  put an old, gray  dress on her, and gave  her wooden shoes.
A

B

C

D

There are no spelling errors.

SPELLING 

(Sentence taken from Cinderella by The Grim Brothers

 

For questions 36 - 43, you will need to read through the sentence below and identify whether or not it contains a spelling error. 

 

If you believe there is an error, you should identify where it occurs using the sections A, B, C or D as shown above the sentence.

 

A B C D
"Just look at the proud  Princess" they cried, and  laughed, and lead  her into the kitchen.
A

B

C

D

There are no spelling errors.

SPELLING 

(Sentence taken from Cinderella by The Grim Brothers)

 

For questions 36 - 43, you will need to read through the sentence below and identify whether or not it contains a spelling error. 

 

If you believe there is an error, you should identify where it occurs using the sections A, B, C or D as shown above the sentence.

 

A B C D
Their she had to work  from morning till night,  carrying water, lighting  fires, cooking and washing.
A

B

C

D

There are no spelling errors.

SPELLING 

(Sentence taken from Cinderella by The Grim Brothers

 

For questions 36 - 43, you will need to read through the sentence below and identify whether or not it contains a spelling error. 

 

If you believe there is an error, you should identify where it occurs using the sections A, B, C or D as shown above the sentence.

 

A B C D
The sisters were   so unkind.  They mocked  her and made her work untill she was weary.

 

 
A

B

C

D

There are no spelling errors.

For questions 44 - 52, you need to select the word that is most appropriate to complete the sentence.

 

The scientific name for a Giraffe is a Giraffa camelopardalis, and they are most commonly ( ____ ) in Africa.

Living

Residence

Stopping

Found

Hunted

For questions 44 - 52, you need to select the word that is most appropriate to complete the sentence.

 

Giraffes have only seven ( ____ ) in their necks, which is the same number as humans.

Centimetres

Vessels

Tubes

Spines

Vertebrae

For questions 44 - 52, you need to select the word that is most appropriate to complete the sentence.

 

Giraffes are the tallest animals in the world and can reach as high as 6 ( ____ ).

Centimetres

Tonnes

Metres

Kilograms

Stone

For questions 44 - 52, you need to select the word that is most appropriate to complete the sentence.

 

Giraffes have long, black tongues that can ( ____ ) 50 cm in length.

Stretch

Measure

Rise

Growth

Store

For questions 44 - 52, you need to select the word that is most appropriate to complete the sentence.

 

In terms of diet, giraffes are ( ____ ).

Hungry

Flexible

Dieters

Vegetarians

Ill

For questions 44 - 52, you need to select the word that is most appropriate to complete the sentence.

 

A ( ____ ) giraffe is called a bull.

Baby

Male

Female

Angry

Adolescent

For questions 44 - 52, you need to select the word that is most appropriate to complete the sentence.

 

To establish a pecking order, male giraffes will take part in ( ____ ) wrestling.

Neck

Tree

Leaf

Sumo

Head

For questions 44 - 52, you need to select the word that is most appropriate to complete the sentence.

 

An adult giraffe can ( ____ ) at speeds of 34 miles per hour.

Walk

Meander

Gallop

Gravitate

Circle

For questions 44 - 52, you need to select the word that is most appropriate to complete the sentence.

 

Giraffes will ( ____ ) off predators by kicking with their fore or hind legs.

Attack

Exaccerbate

Entice

Fend

Encourage

  • Question 1

COMPREHENSION

 

Read the passage below. 

 

For this first section (questions 1 - 27), you will be asked questions to demonstrate your understanding of the text. 

 

 

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Chapter 1

 

1 Alice was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had no pictures or conversations in it, "and what is the use of a book," thought Alice "without pictures or conversation?"

 

2 So she was considering in her own mind (as well as she could, for the hot day made her feel very sleepy and stupid), whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be worth the trouble of getting up and picking the daisies, when suddenly a White Rabbit with pink eyes ran close by her.

 

3 There was nothing so very remarkable in that; nor did Alice think it so very much out of the way to hear the Rabbit say to itself, "Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be late!" (when she thought it over afterwards, it occurred to her that she ought to have wondered at this, but at the time it all seemed quite natural); but when the Rabbit actually took a watch out of its waistcoat-pocket, and looked at it, and then hurried on, Alice started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had never before seen a rabbit with either a waistcoat-pocket, or a watch to take out of it, and burning with curiosity, she ran across the field after it, and fortunately was just in time to see it pop down a large rabbit-hole under the hedge.

 

4 In another moment down went Alice after it, never once considering how in the world she was to get out again.

 

5 The rabbit-hole went straight on like a tunnel for some way and then dipped suddenly down, so suddenly that Alice had not a moment to think about stopping herself before she found herself falling down a very deep well.

 

 

What word best describes Alice's feeling when she's sat on the river bank? 

CORRECT ANSWER
Restless
EDDIE SAYS
The answer is b. Alice is restless and trying to decide what to do while sitting on the river bank.
  • Question 2

COMPREHENSION 

 

Read the passage below. 

 

For this first section (questions 1 - 27), you will be asked questions to demonstrate your understanding of the text. 

 

 

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Chapter 1

 

1 Alice was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had no pictures or conversations in it, "and what is the use of a book," thought Alice "without pictures or conversation?"

 

2 So she was considering in her own mind (as well as she could, for the hot day made her feel very sleepy and stupid), whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be worth the trouble of getting up and picking the daisies, when suddenly a White Rabbit with pink eyes ran close by her.

 

3 There was nothing so very remarkable in that; nor did Alice think it so very much out of the way to hear the Rabbit say to itself, "Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be late!" (when she thought it over afterwards, it occurred to her that she ought to have wondered at this, but at the time it all seemed quite natural); but when the Rabbit actually took a watch out of its waistcoat-pocket, and looked at it, and then hurried on, Alice started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had never before seen a rabbit with either a waistcoat-pocket, or a watch to take out of it, and burning with curiosity, she ran across the field after it, and fortunately was just in time to see it pop down a large rabbit-hole under the hedge.

 

In another moment down went Alice after it, never once considering how in the world she was to get out again.

 

5 The rabbit-hole went straight on like a tunnel for some way and then dipped suddenly down, so suddenly that Alice had not a moment to think about stopping herself before she found herself falling down a very deep well.

 

 

What does Alice think about her sister's book?    

CORRECT ANSWER
It's hard to understand because it hasn't any pictures.
EDDIE SAYS
The answer is d. Alice doesn't find the book easy to understand, as there are not any pictures to help her.
  • Question 3

COMPREHENSION 

 

Read the passage below. 

 

For this first section (questions 1 - 27), you will be asked questions to demonstrate your understanding of the text. 

 

 

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Chapter 1

 

1 Alice was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had no pictures or conversations in it, "and what is the use of a book," thought Alice "without pictures or conversation?"

 

2 So she was considering in her own mind (as well as she could, for the hot day made her feel very sleepy and stupid), whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be worth the trouble of getting up and picking the daisies, when suddenly a White Rabbit with pink eyes ran close by her.

 

3 There was nothing so very remarkable in that; nor did Alice think it so very much out of the way to hear the Rabbit say to itself, "Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be late!" (when she thought it over afterwards, it occurred to her that she ought to have wondered at this, but at the time it all seemed quite natural); but when the Rabbit actually took a watch out of its waistcoat-pocket, and looked at it, and then hurried on, Alice started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had never before seen a rabbit with either a waistcoat-pocket, or a watch to take out of it, and burning with curiosity, she ran across the field after it, and fortunately was just in time to see it pop down a large rabbit-hole under the hedge.

 

4 In another moment down went Alice after it, never once considering how in the world she was to get out again.

 

5 The rabbit-hole went straight on like a tunnel for some way and then dipped suddenly down, so suddenly that Alice had not a moment to think about stopping herself before she found herself falling down a very deep well.

 

 

What has made Alice feel 'sleepy and stupid'? 

CORRECT ANSWER
The weather
EDDIE SAYS
The answer is b. The weather is hot and Alice is feeling sleepy because of it.
  • Question 4

COMPREHENSION 

 

Read the passage below. 

 

For this first section (questions 1 - 27), you will be asked questions to demonstrate your understanding of the text. 

 

 

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Chapter 1

 

1 Alice was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had no pictures or conversations in it, "and what is the use of a book," thought Alice "without pictures or conversation?"

 

2 So she was considering in her own mind (as well as she could, for the hot day made her feel very sleepy and stupid), whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be worth the trouble of getting up and picking the daisies, when suddenly a White Rabbit with pink eyes ran close by her.

 

3 There was nothing so very remarkable in that; nor did Alice think it so very much out of the way to hear the Rabbit say to itself, "Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be late!" (when she thought it over afterwards, it occurred to her that she ought to have wondered at this, but at the time it all seemed quite natural); but when the Rabbit actually took a watch out of its waistcoat-pocket, and looked at it, and then hurried on, Alice started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had never before seen a rabbit with either a waistcoat-pocket, or a watch to take out of it, and burning with curiosity, she ran across the field after it, and fortunately was just in time to see it pop down a large rabbit-hole under the hedge.

 

4 In another moment down went Alice after it, never once considering how in the world she was to get out again.

 

5 The rabbit-hole went straight on like a tunnel for some way and then dipped suddenly down, so suddenly that Alice had not a moment to think about stopping herself before she found herself falling down a very deep well.

 

 

Which of the following quotations describes the way in which Alice follows the Rabbit?  

CORRECT ANSWER
'Burning with curiosity'
EDDIE SAYS
The answer is b. She is extremely interested by the rabbit and so follows him instinctively.
  • Question 5

COMPREHENSION 

 

Read the passage below. 

 

For this first section (questions 1 - 27), you will be asked questions to demonstrate your understanding of the text. 

 

 

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Chapter 1

 

1 Alice was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had no pictures or conversations in it, "and what is the use of a book," thought Alice "without pictures or conversation?"

 

2 So she was considering in her own mind (as well as she could, for the hot day made her feel very sleepy and stupid), whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be worth the trouble of getting up and picking the daisies, when suddenly a White Rabbit with pink eyes ran close by her.

 

3 There was nothing so very remarkable in that; nor did Alice think it so very much out of the way to hear the Rabbit say to itself, "Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be late!" (when she thought it over afterwards, it occurred to her that she ought to have wondered at this, but at the time it all seemed quite natural); but when the Rabbit actually took a watch out of its waistcoat-pocket, and looked at it, and then hurried on, Alice started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had never before seen a rabbit with either a waistcoat-pocket, or a watch to take out of it, and burning with curiosity, she ran across the field after it, and fortunately was just in time to see it pop down a large rabbit-hole under the hedge.

 

4 In another moment down went Alice after it, never once considering how in the world she was to get out again.

 

The rabbit-hole went straight on like a tunnel for some way and then dipped suddenly down, so suddenly that Alice had not a moment to think about stopping herself before she found herself falling down a very deep well.

 

 

In the text, which word suggests how Alice feels when she sees where the Rabbit has gone?

CORRECT ANSWER
Fortunate
EDDIE SAYS
The answer is a. The word 'fortunate' is in the text. Make sure you read carefully to spot single words like this!
  • Question 6

COMPREHENSION

 

Read the passage below. 

 

For this first section (questions 1 - 27), you will be asked questions to demonstrate your understanding of the text. 

 

 

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Chapter 1

 

1 Alice was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had no pictures or conversations in it, "and what is the use of a book," thought Alice "without pictures or conversation?"

 

2 So she was considering in her own mind (as well as she could, for the hot day made her feel very sleepy and stupid), whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be worth the trouble of getting up and picking the daisies, when suddenly a White Rabbit with pink eyes ran close by her.

 

3 There was nothing so very remarkable in that; nor did Alice think it so very much out of the way to hear the Rabbit say to itself, "Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be late!" (when she thought it over afterwards, it occurred to her that she ought to have wondered at this, but at the time it all seemed quite natural); but when the Rabbit actually took a watch out of its waistcoat-pocket, and looked at it, and then hurried on, Alice started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had never before seen a rabbit with either a waistcoat-pocket, or a watch to take out of it, and burning with curiosity, she ran across the field after it, and fortunately was just in time to see it pop down a large rabbit-hole under the hedge.

 

4 In another moment down went Alice after it, never once considering how in the world she was to get out again.

 

5 The rabbit-hole went straight on like a tunnel for some way and then dipped suddenly down, so suddenly that Alice had not a moment to think about stopping herself before she found herself falling down a very deep well.

 

 

Which linguistic devise does Carroll use at the end of the first paragraph?

CORRECT ANSWER
Rhetorical question
EDDIE SAYS
The answer is c. Alice asks a question but is not expecting an answer from anyone. The purpose of this is to share Alice's thoughts with the reader.
  • Question 7

COMPREHENSION 

 

Read the passage below. 

 

For this first section (questions 1 - 27), you will be asked questions to demonstrate your understanding of the text. 

 

 

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Chapter 1

 

1 Alice was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had no pictures or conversations in it, "and what is the use of a book," thought Alice "without pictures or conversation?"

 

2 So she was considering in her own mind (as well as she could, for the hot day made her feel very sleepy and stupid), whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be worth the trouble of getting up and picking the daisies, when suddenly a White Rabbit with pink eyes ran close by her.

 

3 There was nothing so very remarkable in that; nor did Alice think it so very much out of the way to hear the Rabbit say to itself, "Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be late!" (when she thought it over afterwards, it occurred to her that she ought to have wondered at this, but at the time it all seemed quite natural); but when the Rabbit actually took a watch out of its waistcoat-pocket, and looked at it, and then hurried on, Alice started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had never before seen a rabbit with either a waistcoat-pocket, or a watch to take out of it, and burning with curiosity, she ran across the field after it, and fortunately was just in time to see it pop down a large rabbit-hole under the hedge.

 

In another moment down went Alice after it, never once considering how in the world she was to get out again.

 

The rabbit-hole went straight on like a tunnel for some way and then dipped suddenly down, so suddenly that Alice had not a moment to think about stopping herself before she found herself falling down a very deep well.

 

 

In the text, which word suggests how Alice feels when she sees where the Rabbit has gone?

CORRECT ANSWER
Fortunate
EDDIE SAYS
The answer is a.
  • Question 8

COMPREHENSION 

 

Read the passage below. 

 

For this first section (questions 1- 27), you will be asked questions to demonstrate your understanding of the text. 

 

 

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Chapter 1

 

1 Alice was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had no pictures or conversations in it, "and what is the use of a book," thought Alice "without pictures or conversation?"

 

2 So she was considering in her own mind (as well as she could, for the hot day made her feel very sleepy and stupid), whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be worth the trouble of getting up and picking the daisies, when suddenly a White Rabbit with pink eyes ran close by her.

 

3 There was nothing so very remarkable in that; nor did Alice think it so very much out of the way to hear the Rabbit say to itself, "Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be late!" (when she thought it over afterwards, it occurred to her that she ought to have wondered at this, but at the time it all seemed quite natural); but when the Rabbit actually took a watch out of its waistcoat-pocket, and looked at it, and then hurried on, Alice started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had never before seen a rabbit with either a waistcoat-pocket, or a watch to take out of it, and burning with curiosity, she ran across the field after it, and fortunately was just in time to see it pop down a large rabbit-hole under the hedge.

 

4 In another moment down went Alice after it, never once considering how in the world she was to get out again.

 

5 The rabbit-hole went straight on like a tunnel for some way and then dipped suddenly down, so suddenly that Alice had not a moment to think about stopping herself before she found herself falling down a very deep well.

 

 

What is the purpose of including a rhetorical question in the first paragraph?      

CORRECT ANSWER
It shows the reader what Alice is thinking.
EDDIE SAYS
The answer is d.
  • Question 9

COMPREHENSION 

 

Read the passage below. 

 

For this first section (questions 1 - 27), you will be asked questions to demonstrate your understanding of the text. 

 

 

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Chapter 1

 

1 Alice was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had no pictures or conversations in it, "and what is the use of a book," thought Alice "without pictures or conversation?"

 

2 So she was considering in her own mind (as well as she could, for the hot day made her feel very sleepy and stupid), whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be worth the trouble of getting up and picking the daisies, when suddenly a White Rabbit with pink eyes ran close by her.

 

3 There was nothing so very remarkable in that; nor did Alice think it so very much out of the way to hear the Rabbit say to itself, "Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be late!" (when she thought it over afterwards, it occurred to her that she ought to have wondered at this, but at the time it all seemed quite natural); but when the Rabbit actually took a watch out of its waistcoat-pocket, and looked at it, and then hurried on, Alice started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had never before seen a rabbit with either a waistcoat-pocket, or a watch to take out of it, and burning with curiosity, she ran across the field after it, and fortunately was just in time to see it pop down a large rabbit-hole under the hedge.

 

4 In another moment down went Alice after it, never once considering how in the world she was to get out again.

 

5 The rabbit-hole went straight on like a tunnel for some way and then dipped suddenly down, so suddenly that Alice had not a moment to think about stopping herself before she found herself falling down a very deep well.

 

 

What language does Carroll use to suggest that the Rabbit is in a rush?  

CORRECT ANSWER
Hurried on
EDDIE SAYS
The answer is a. Always go back to the text and read each option in context.
  • Question 10

COMPREHENSION 

 

Read the passage below. 

 

For this first section (questions 1 - 27), you will be asked questions to demonstrate your understanding of the text. 

 

 

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Chapter 1

 

1 Alice was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had no pictures or conversations in it, "and what is the use of a book," thought Alice "without pictures or conversation?"

 

2 So she was considering in her own mind (as well as she could, for the hot day made her feel very sleepy and stupid), whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be worth the trouble of getting up and picking the daisies, when suddenly a White Rabbit with pink eyes ran close by her.

 

3 There was nothing so very remarkable in that; nor did Alice think it so very much out of the way to hear the Rabbit say to itself, "Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be late!" (when she thought it over afterwards, it occurred to her that she ought to have wondered at this, but at the time it all seemed quite natural); but when the Rabbit actually took a watch out of its waistcoat-pocket, and looked at it, and then hurried on, Alice started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had never before seen a rabbit with either a waistcoat-pocket, or a watch to take out of it, and burning with curiosity, she ran across the field after it, and fortunately was just in time to see it pop down a large rabbit-hole under the hedge.

 

4 In another moment down went Alice after it, never once considering how in the world she was to get out again.

 

5 The rabbit-hole went straight on like a tunnel for some way and then dipped suddenly down, so suddenly that Alice had not a moment to think about stopping herself before she found herself falling down a very deep well.

 

 

Alice could be described as hasty as she follows the rabbit into the rabbit-hole. 

What does she fail to think about?           

CORRECT ANSWER
How she will get out again.
EDDIE SAYS
The answer is c. Alice is so keen to follow the rabbit that she 'never once in the world' considers how to get out again!
  • Question 11

COMPREHENSION 

 

Read the passage below. 

 

For this first section (questions 1 - 27), you will be asked questions to demonstrate your understanding of the text. 

 

 

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Chapter 1

 

1 Alice was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had no pictures or conversations in it, "and what is the use of a book," thought Alice "without pictures or conversation?"

 

2 So she was considering in her own mind (as well as she could, for the hot day made her feel very sleepy and stupid), whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be worth the trouble of getting up and picking the daisies, when suddenly a White Rabbit with pink eyes ran close by her.

 

3 There was nothing so very remarkable in that; nor did Alice think it so very much out of the way to hear the Rabbit say to itself, "Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be late!" (when she thought it over afterwards, it occurred to her that she ought to have wondered at this, but at the time it all seemed quite natural); but when the Rabbit actually took a watch out of its waistcoat-pocket, and looked at it, and then hurried on, Alice started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had never before seen a rabbit with either a waistcoat-pocket, or a watch to take out of it, and burning with curiosity, she ran across the field after it, and fortunately was just in time to see it pop down a large rabbit-hole under the hedge.

 

4 In another moment down went Alice after it, never once considering how in the world she was to get out again.

 

5 The rabbit-hole went straight on like a tunnel for some way and then dipped suddenly down, so suddenly that Alice had not a moment to think about stopping herself before she found herself falling down a very deep well.

 

 

Can you identify the verb in paragraph 2 ?     

CORRECT ANSWER
Picking
EDDIE SAYS
The answer is d. Considering is not a verb in this context, it is a preposition and conjunction.
  • Question 12

COMPREHENSION 

 

Read the passage below. 

 

For this first section (questions 1 - 27), you will be asked questions to demonstrate your understanding of the text. 

 

 

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Chapter 1

 

1 Alice was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had no pictures or conversations in it, "and what is the use of a book," thought Alice "without pictures or conversation?"

 

2 So she was considering in her own mind (as well as she could, for the hot day made her feel very sleepy and stupid), whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be worth the trouble of getting up and picking the daisies, when suddenly a White Rabbit with pink eyes ran close by her.

 

3 There was nothing so very remarkable in that; nor did Alice think it so very much out of the way to hear the Rabbit say to itself, "Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be late!" (when she thought it over afterwards, it occurred to her that she ought to have wondered at this, but at the time it all seemed quite natural); but when the Rabbit actually took a watch out of its waistcoat-pocket, and looked at it, and then hurried on, Alice started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had never before seen a rabbit with either a waistcoat-pocket, or a watch to take out of it, and burning with curiosity, she ran across the field after it, and fortunately was just in time to see it pop down a large rabbit-hole under the hedge.

 

4 In another moment down went Alice after it, never once considering how in the world she was to get out again.

 

5 The rabbit-hole went straight on like a tunnel for some way and then dipped suddenly down, so suddenly that Alice had not a moment to think about stopping herself before she found herself falling down a very deep well.

 

 

Which word in the list below does NOT have a similar meaning to the word 'remarkable'?

CORRECT ANSWER
Disappointing
EDDIE SAYS
The answer is c. All the other options are synonyms of the word 'remarkable'.
  • Question 13

COMPREHENSION 

 

Read the passage below. 

 

For this first section (questions 1 - 27), you will be asked questions to demonstrate your understanding of the text. 

 

 

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Chapter 7

 

1 There was a table set out under a tree in front of the house, and the March Hare and the Hatter were having tea at it: a Dormouse was sitting between them, fast asleep, and the other two were using it as a cushion, resting their elbows on it, and talking over its head. "Very uncomfortable for the Dormouse," thought Alice; "only, as it's asleep, I suppose it doesn't mind."

2 The table was a large one, but the three were all crowded together at one corner of it: "No room! No room!" they cried out when they saw Alice coming. "There's plenty of room!" said Alice indignantly, and she sat down in a large arm-chair at one end of the table.

3 "Have some wine," the March Hare said in an encouraging tone.

4 Alice looked all round the table, but there was nothing on it but tea. "I don't see any wine," she remarked.

5 "There isn't any," said the March Hare.

"Then it wasn't very civil of you to offer it," said Alice angrily.

7 "It wasn't very civil of you to sit down without being invited," said the March Hare.

8 "I didn't know it was your table," said Alice; "it's laid for a great many more than three."

9 "Your hair wants cutting," said the Hatter. He had been looking at Alice for some time with great curiosity, and this was his first speech.

10 "You should learn not to make personal remarks," Alice said with some severity; "it's very rude."

11 The Hatter opened his eyes very wide on hearing this; but all he said was, "Why is a raven like a writing-desk?"

12 "Come, we shall have some fun now!" thought Alice. "I'm glad they've begun asking riddles.--I believe I can guess that," she added aloud.

13 "Do you mean that you think you can find out the answer to it?" said the March Hare.

14 "Exactly so," said Alice.

15 "Then you should say what you mean," the March Hare went on.

16 "I do," Alice hastily replied; "at least--at least I mean what I say--that's the same thing, you know."

17 "Not the same thing a bit!" said the Hatter. "You might just as well say that 'I see what I eat' is the same thing as 'I eat what I see'!"

 

 

What is being used as a cushion in this passage?

CORRECT ANSWER
Dormouse
EDDIE SAYS
The answer is a. Alice is concerned that it is not very comfortable for the Dormouse to be used as a cushion.
  • Question 14

COMPREHENSION 

 

Read the passage below.  

 

For this first section (questions 1 - 27), you will be asked questions to demonstrate your understanding of the text. 

 

 

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Chapter 7

 

1 There was a table set out under a tree in front of the house, and the March Hare and the Hatter were having tea at it: a Dormouse was sitting between them, fast asleep, and the other two were using it as a cushion, resting their elbows on it, and talking over its head. "Very uncomfortable for the Dormouse," thought Alice; "only, as it's asleep, I suppose it doesn't mind."

2 The table was a large one, but the three were all crowded together at one corner of it: "No room! No room!" they cried out when they saw Alice coming. "There's plenty of room!" said Alice indignantly, and she sat down in a large arm-chair at one end of the table.

3 "Have some wine," the March Hare said in an encouraging tone.

4 Alice looked all round the table, but there was nothing on it but tea. "I don't see any wine," she remarked.

5 "There isn't any," said the March Hare.

6 "Then it wasn't very civil of you to offer it," said Alice angrily.

7 "It wasn't very civil of you to sit down without being invited," said the March Hare.

8 "I didn't know it was your table," said Alice; "it's laid for a great many more than three."

9 "Your hair wants cutting," said the Hatter. He had been looking at Alice for some time with great curiosity, and this was his first speech.

10 "You should learn not to make personal remarks," Alice said with some severity; "it's very rude."

11 The Hatter opened his eyes very wide on hearing this; but all he said was, "Why is a raven like a writing-desk?"

12 "Come, we shall have some fun now!" thought Alice. "I'm glad they've begun asking riddles.--I believe I can guess that," she added aloud.

13 "Do you mean that you think you can find out the answer to it?" said the March Hare.

14 "Exactly so," said Alice.

15 "Then you should say what you mean," the March Hare went on.

16 "I do," Alice hastily replied; "at least--at least I mean what I say--that's the same thing, you know."

17 "Not the same thing a bit!" said the Hatter. "You might just as well say that 'I see what I eat' is the same thing as 'I eat what I see'!"

 

 

Who is first to speak to Alice when she sits down in this passage?

CORRECT ANSWER
March Hare
EDDIE SAYS
The answer is c. The March Hare offers Alice the invisible wine!
  • Question 15

COMPREHENSION 

 

Read the passage below.  

 

For this first section (questions 1 - 27), you will be asked questions to demonstrate your understanding of the text. 

 

 

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Chapter 7

 

1 There was a table set out under a tree in front of the house, and the March Hare and the Hatter were having tea at it: a Dormouse was sitting between them, fast asleep, and the other two were using it as a cushion, resting their elbows on it, and talking over its head. "Very uncomfortable for the Dormouse," thought Alice; "only, as it's asleep, I suppose it doesn't mind."

2 The table was a large one, but the three were all crowded together at one corner of it: "No room! No room!" they cried out when they saw Alice coming. "There's plenty of room!" said Alice indignantly, and she sat down in a large arm-chair at one end of the table.

3 "Have some wine," the March Hare said in an encouraging tone.

4 Alice looked all round the table, but there was nothing on it but tea. "I don't see any wine," she remarked.

5 "There isn't any," said the March Hare.

6 "Then it wasn't very civil of you to offer it," said Alice angrily.

7 "It wasn't very civil of you to sit down without being invited," said the March Hare.

8 "I didn't know it was your table," said Alice; "it's laid for a great many more than three."

9 "Your hair wants cutting," said the Hatter. He had been looking at Alice for some time with great curiosity, and this was his first speech.

10 "You should learn not to make personal remarks," Alice said with some severity; "it's very rude."

11 The Hatter opened his eyes very wide on hearing this; but all he said was, "Why is a raven like a writing-desk?"

12 "Come, we shall have some fun now!" thought Alice. "I'm glad they've begun asking riddles.--I believe I can guess that," she added aloud.

13 "Do you mean that you think you can find out the answer to it?" said the March Hare.

14 "Exactly so," said Alice.

15 "Then you should say what you mean," the March Hare went on.

16 "I do," Alice hastily replied; "at least--at least I mean what I say--that's the same thing, you know."

17 "Not the same thing a bit!" said the Hatter. "You might just as well say that 'I see what I eat' is the same thing as 'I eat what I see'!"

 

 

Why is Alice indignant?

CORRECT ANSWER
There is plenty of space but she is told "No room".
EDDIE SAYS
The answer is d. Alice is indignant because there is plenty of room at the large table but the Mad Hatter and March Hare shout "No room! No room!" at her.
  • Question 16

COMPREHENSION 

 

Read the passage below.  

 

For this first section (questions 1 - 27), you will be asked questions to demonstrate your understanding of the text. 

 

 

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Chapter 7

 

1 There was a table set out under a tree in front of the house, and the March Hare and the Hatter were having tea at it: a Dormouse was sitting between them, fast asleep, and the other two were using it as a cushion, resting their elbows on it, and talking over its head. "Very uncomfortable for the Dormouse," thought Alice; "only, as it's asleep, I suppose it doesn't mind."

2 The table was a large one, but the three were all crowded together at one corner of it: "No room! No room!" they cried out when they saw Alice coming. "There's plenty of room!" said Alice indignantly, and she sat down in a large arm-chair at one end of the table.

3 "Have some wine," the March Hare said in an encouraging tone.

4 Alice looked all round the table, but there was nothing on it but tea. "I don't see any wine," she remarked.

5 "There isn't any," said the March Hare.

6 "Then it wasn't very civil of you to offer it," said Alice angrily.

7 "It wasn't very civil of you to sit down without being invited," said the March Hare.

8 "I didn't know it was your table," said Alice; "it's laid for a great many more than three."

9 "Your hair wants cutting," said the Hatter. He had been looking at Alice for some time with great curiosity, and this was his first speech.

10 "You should learn not to make personal remarks," Alice said with some severity; "it's very rude."

11 The Hatter opened his eyes very wide on hearing this; but all he said was, "Why is a raven like a writing-desk?"

12 "Come, we shall have some fun now!" thought Alice. "I'm glad they've begun asking riddles.--I believe I can guess that," she added aloud.

13 "Do you mean that you think you can find out the answer to it?" said the March Hare.

14 "Exactly so," said Alice.

15 "Then you should say what you mean," the March Hare went on.

16 "I do," Alice hastily replied; "at least--at least I mean what I say--that's the same thing, you know."

17 "Not the same thing a bit!" said the Hatter. "You might just as well say that 'I see what I eat' is the same thing as 'I eat what I see'!"

 

 

What does Alice mean when she uses the phrase "it wasn't very civil" in line 6?

CORRECT ANSWER
It was impolite.
EDDIE SAYS
The answer is b. Alice thinks that it is rude / impolite / not civil of the Mad Hatter to offer wine when there is none at the table.
  • Question 17

COMPREHENSION 

 

Read the passage below.  

 

For this first section (questions 1 - 27), you will be asked questions to demonstrate your understanding of the text. 

 

 

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Chapter 7

 

1 There was a table set out under a tree in front of the house, and the March Hare and the Hatter were having tea at it: a Dormouse was sitting between them, fast asleep, and the other two were using it as a cushion, resting their elbows on it, and talking over its head. "Very uncomfortable for the Dormouse," thought Alice; "only, as it's asleep, I suppose it doesn't mind."

2 The table was a large one, but the three were all crowded together at one corner of it: "No room! No room!" they cried out when they saw Alice coming. "There's plenty of room!" said Alice indignantly, and she sat down in a large arm-chair at one end of the table.

3 "Have some wine," the March Hare said in an encouraging tone.

4 Alice looked all round the table, but there was nothing on it but tea. "I don't see any wine," she remarked.

5 "There isn't any," said the March Hare.

6 "Then it wasn't very civil of you to offer it," said Alice angrily.

7 "It wasn't very civil of you to sit down without being invited," said the March Hare.

8 "I didn't know it was your table," said Alice; "it's laid for a great many more than three."

9 "Your hair wants cutting," said the Hatter. He had been looking at Alice for some time with great curiosity, and this was his first speech.

10 "You should learn not to make personal remarks," Alice said with some severity; "it's very rude."

11 The Hatter opened his eyes very wide on hearing this; but all he said was, "Why is a raven like a writing-desk?"

12 "Come, we shall have some fun now!" thought Alice. "I'm glad they've begun asking riddles.--I believe I can guess that," she added aloud.

13 "Do you mean that you think you can find out the answer to it?" said the March Hare.

14 "Exactly so," said Alice.

15 "Then you should say what you mean," the March Hare went on.

16 "I do," Alice hastily replied; "at least--at least I mean what I say--that's the same thing, you know."

17 "Not the same thing a bit!" said the Hatter. "You might just as well say that 'I see what I eat' is the same thing as 'I eat what I see'!"

 

 

In line 17, Carroll uses a literary device.

Which one do you see in action here?

CORRECT ANSWER
Monosyllabic sentence
EDDIE SAYS
The answer is e. The last sentence is monosyllabic. This means that every word in the sentence has only one syllable.
  • Question 18

COMPREHENSION 

 

Read the passage below.  

 

For this first section (questions 1 - 27), you will be asked questions to demonstrate your understanding of the text. 

 

 

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Chapter 7

 

1 There was a table set out under a tree in front of the house, and the March Hare and the Hatter were having tea at it: a Dormouse was sitting between them, fast asleep, and the other two were using it as a cushion, resting their elbows on it, and talking over its head. "Very uncomfortable for the Dormouse," thought Alice; "only, as it's asleep, I suppose it doesn't mind."

2 The table was a large one, but the three were all crowded together at one corner of it: "No room! No room!" they cried out when they saw Alice coming. "There's plenty of room!" said Alice indignantly, and she sat down in a large arm-chair at one end of the table.

3 "Have some wine," the March Hare said in an encouraging tone.

4 Alice looked all round the table, but there was nothing on it but tea. "I don't see any wine," she remarked.

5 "There isn't any," said the March Hare.

6 "Then it wasn't very civil of you to offer it," said Alice angrily.

7 "It wasn't very civil of you to sit down without being invited," said the March Hare.

8 "I didn't know it was your table," said Alice; "it's laid for a great many more than three."

9 "Your hair wants cutting," said the Hatter. He had been looking at Alice for some time with great curiosity, and this was his first speech.

10 "You should learn not to make personal remarks," Alice said with some severity; "it's very rude."

11 The Hatter opened his eyes very wide on hearing this; but all he said was, "Why is a raven like a writing-desk?"

12 "Come, we shall have some fun now!" thought Alice. "I'm glad they've begun asking riddles.--I believe I can guess that," she added aloud.

13 "Do you mean that you think you can find out the answer to it?" said the March Hare.

14 "Exactly so," said Alice.

15 "Then you should say what you mean," the March Hare went on.

16 "I do," Alice hastily replied; "at least--at least I mean what I say--that's the same thing, you know."

17 "Not the same thing a bit!" said the Hatter. "You might just as well say that 'I see what I eat' is the same thing as 'I eat what I see'!"

 

 

What does the sentence 'Alice said with some severity' mean?

CORRECT ANSWER
Alice is speaking firmly.
EDDIE SAYS
The answer is b. The implication is that Alice is not very impressed and so is speaking forcefully or firmly to address this.
  • Question 19

COMPREHENSION 

 

Read the passage below.  

 

For this first section (questions 1 - 27), you will be asked questions to demonstrate your understanding of the text. 

 

 

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Chapter 7

 

1 There was a table set out under a tree in front of the house, and the March Hare and the Hatter were having tea at it: a Dormouse was sitting between them, fast asleep, and the other two were using it as a cushion, resting their elbows on it, and talking over its head. "Very uncomfortable for the Dormouse," thought Alice; "only, as it's asleep, I suppose it doesn't mind."

2 The table was a large one, but the three were all crowded together at one corner of it: "No room! No room!" they cried out when they saw Alice coming. "There's plenty of room!" said Alice indignantly, and she sat down in a large arm-chair at one end of the table.

3 "Have some wine," the March Hare said in an encouraging tone.

4 Alice looked all round the table, but there was nothing on it but tea. "I don't see any wine," she remarked.

5 "There isn't any," said the March Hare.

6 "Then it wasn't very civil of you to offer it," said Alice angrily.

7 "It wasn't very civil of you to sit down without being invited," said the March Hare.

8 "I didn't know it was your table," said Alice; "it's laid for a great many more than three."

9 "Your hair wants cutting," said the Hatter. He had been looking at Alice for some time with great curiosity, and this was his first speech.

10 "You should learn not to make personal remarks," Alice said with some severity; "it's very rude."

11 The Hatter opened his eyes very wide on hearing this; but all he said was, "Why is a raven like a writing-desk?"

12 "Come, we shall have some fun now!" thought Alice. "I'm glad they've begun asking riddles.--I believe I can guess that," she added aloud.

13 "Do you mean that you think you can find out the answer to it?" said the March Hare.

14 "Exactly so," said Alice.

15 "Then you should say what you mean," the March Hare went on.

16 "I do," Alice hastily replied; "at least--at least I mean what I say--that's the same thing, you know."

17 "Not the same thing a bit!" said the Hatter. "You might just as well say that 'I see what I eat' is the same thing as 'I eat what I see'!"

 

 

Why is the 'Mad Hatter' a good name to describe the Hatter's characteristics?

CORRECT ANSWER
He is an eccentric hatter who is hard to understand.
EDDIE SAYS
The answer is c. Look carefully at what the Hatter says. He speaks a lot without saying very much and jumps from topic to topic in a way that seems a bit 'mad'.
  • Question 20

COMPREHENSION 

 

Read the passage below.  

 

For this first section (questions 1 - 27), you will be asked questions to demonstrate your understanding of the text. 

 

 

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Chapter 7

 

1 There was a table set out under a tree in front of the house, and the March Hare and the Hatter were having tea at it: a Dormouse was sitting between them, fast asleep, and the other two were using it as a cushion, resting their elbows on it, and talking over its head. "Very uncomfortable for the Dormouse," thought Alice; "only, as it's asleep, I suppose it doesn't mind."

2 The table was a large one, but the three were all crowded together at one corner of it: "No room! No room!" they cried out when they saw Alice coming. "There's plenty of room!" said Alice indignantly, and she sat down in a large arm-chair at one end of the table.

3 "Have some wine," the March Hare said in an encouraging tone.

4 Alice looked all round the table, but there was nothing on it but tea. "I don't see any wine," she remarked.

5 "There isn't any," said the March Hare.

6 "Then it wasn't very civil of you to offer it," said Alice angrily.

7 "It wasn't very civil of you to sit down without being invited," said the March Hare.

8 "I didn't know it was your table," said Alice; "it's laid for a great many more than three."

9 "Your hair wants cutting," said the Hatter. He had been looking at Alice for some time with great curiosity, and this was his first speech.

10 "You should learn not to make personal remarks," Alice said with some severity; "it's very rude."

11 The Hatter opened his eyes very wide on hearing this; but all he said was, "Why is a raven like a writing-desk?"

12 "Come, we shall have some fun now!" thought Alice. "I'm glad they've begun asking riddles.--I believe I can guess that," she added aloud.

13 "Do you mean that you think you can find out the answer to it?" said the March Hare.

14 "Exactly so," said Alice.

15 "Then you should say what you mean," the March Hare went on.

16 "I do," Alice hastily replied; "at least--at least I mean what I say--that's the same thing, you know."

17 "Not the same thing a bit!" said the Hatter. "You might just as well say that 'I see what I eat' is the same thing as 'I eat what I see'!"

 

 

Which of the words below means the same as curiosity?

CORRECT ANSWER
Inquisitiveness
EDDIE SAYS
The answer is a. If you are curious, then you are intrigued and inquisitive as you want to find out more.
  • Question 21

COMPREHENSION 

 

Read the passage below.  

 

For this first section (questions 1 - 27), you will be asked questions to demonstrate your understanding of the text. 

 

 

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Chapter 7

 

1 There was a table set out under a tree in front of the house, and the March Hare and the Hatter were having tea at it: a Dormouse was sitting between them, fast asleep, and the other two were using it as a cushion, resting their elbows on it, and talking over its head. "Very uncomfortable for the Dormouse," thought Alice; "only, as it's asleep, I suppose it doesn't mind."

2 The table was a large one, but the three were all crowded together at one corner of it: "No room! No room!" they cried out when they saw Alice coming. "There's plenty of room!" said Alice indignantly, and she sat down in a large arm-chair at one end of the table.

3 "Have some wine," the March Hare said in an encouraging tone.

4 Alice looked all round the table, but there was nothing on it but tea. "I don't see any wine," she remarked.

5 "There isn't any," said the March Hare.

6 "Then it wasn't very civil of you to offer it," said Alice angrily.

7 "It wasn't very civil of you to sit down without being invited," said the March Hare.

8 "I didn't know it was your table," said Alice; "it's laid for a great many more than three."

9 "Your hair wants cutting," said the Hatter. He had been looking at Alice for some time with great curiosity, and this was his first speech.

10 "You should learn not to make personal remarks," Alice said with some severity; "it's very rude."

11 The Hatter opened his eyes very wide on hearing this; but all he said was, "Why is a raven like a writing-desk?"

12 "Come, we shall have some fun now!" thought Alice. "I'm glad they've begun asking riddles.--I believe I can guess that," she added aloud.

13 "Do you mean that you think you can find out the answer to it?" said the March Hare.

14 "Exactly so," said Alice.

15 "Then you should say what you mean," the March Hare went on.

16 "I do," Alice hastily replied; "at least--at least I mean what I say--that's the same thing, you know."

17 "Not the same thing a bit!" said the Hatter. "You might just as well say that 'I see what I eat' is the same thing as 'I eat what I see'!"

 

 

Carroll uses repetition twice in this passage of text.

This is included for different impact.

When the March Hare, Mad Hatter and Dormouse shout "No room! No room!", it is to tell Alice emphatically that she is not welcome. 

 

When Alice uses repetition in line 16, what is the impact?

CORRECT ANSWER
To show that Alice is becoming confused by her conversation with the Mad Hatter.
EDDIE SAYS
The answer is c. When Alice says "At least, at least", it is as if she is unsure of what she is saying as she is confused by the Mad Hatter's conversation.
  • Question 22

COMPREHENSION 

 

Read the passage below.  

 

For this first section (questions 1 - 27), you will be asked questions to demonstrate your understanding of the text. 

 

 

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Chapter 7

 

1 There was a table set out under a tree in front of the house, and the March Hare and the Hatter were having tea at it: a Dormouse was sitting between them, fast asleep, and the other two were using it as a cushion, resting their elbows on it, and talking over its head. "Very uncomfortable for the Dormouse," thought Alice; "only, as it's asleep, I suppose it doesn't mind."

2 The table was a large one, but the three were all crowded together at one corner of it: "No room! No room!" they cried out when they saw Alice coming. "There's plenty of room!" said Alice indignantly, and she sat down in a large arm-chair at one end of the table.

3 "Have some wine," the March Hare said in an encouraging tone.

4 Alice looked all round the table, but there was nothing on it but tea. "I don't see any wine," she remarked.

5 "There isn't any," said the March Hare.

6 "Then it wasn't very civil of you to offer it," said Alice angrily.

7 "It wasn't very civil of you to sit down without being invited," said the March Hare.

8 "I didn't know it was your table," said Alice; "it's laid for a great many more than three."

9 "Your hair wants cutting," said the Hatter. He had been looking at Alice for some time with great curiosity, and this was his first speech.

10 "You should learn not to make personal remarks," Alice said with some severity; "it's very rude."

11 The Hatter opened his eyes very wide on hearing this; but all he said was, "Why is a raven like a writing-desk?"

12 "Come, we shall have some fun now!" thought Alice. "I'm glad they've begun asking riddles.--I believe I can guess that," she added aloud.

13 "Do you mean that you think you can find out the answer to it?" said the March Hare.

14 "Exactly so," said Alice.

15 "Then you should say what you mean," the March Hare went on.

16 "I do," Alice hastily replied; "at least--at least I mean what I say--that's the same thing, you know."

17 "Not the same thing a bit!" said the Hatter. "You might just as well say that 'I see what I eat' is the same thing as 'I eat what I see'!"

 

 

In the quote, '"Then it wasn't very civil of you to offer it," said Alice angrily.' which word is the adverb?

CORRECT ANSWER
Angrily
EDDIE SAYS
The answer is e. 'Angrily' explains how Alice speaks, it gives a greater meaning in terms of manner about what is said.
  • Question 23

COMPREHENSION 

 

Read the passage below.  

 

For this first section (questions 1 - 27), you will be asked questions to demonstrate your understanding of the text. 

 

 

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Chapter 7

 

1 There was a table set out under a tree in front of the house, and the March Hare and the Hatter were having tea at it: a Dormouse was sitting between them, fast asleep, and the other two were using it as a cushion, resting their elbows on it, and talking over its head. "Very uncomfortable for the Dormouse," thought Alice; "only, as it's asleep, I suppose it doesn't mind."

2 The table was a large one, but the three were all crowded together at one corner of it: "No room! No room!" they cried out when they saw Alice coming. "There's plenty of room!" said Alice indignantly, and she sat down in a large arm-chair at one end of the table.

3 "Have some wine," the March Hare said in an encouraging tone.

Alice looked all round the table, but there was nothing on it but tea. "I don't see any wine," she remarked.

5 "There isn't any," said the March Hare.

6 "Then it wasn't very civil of you to offer it," said Alice angrily.

7 "It wasn't very civil of you to sit down without being invited," said the March Hare.

8 "I didn't know it was your table," said Alice; "it's laid for a great many more than three."

9 "Your hair wants cutting," said the Hatter. He had been looking at Alice for some time with great curiosity, and this was his first speech.

10 "You should learn not to make personal remarks," Alice said with some severity; "it's very rude."

11 The Hatter opened his eyes very wide on hearing this; but all he said was, "Why is a raven like a writing-desk?"

12 "Come, we shall have some fun now!" thought Alice. "I'm glad they've begun asking riddles.--I believe I can guess that," she added aloud.

13 "Do you mean that you think you can find out the answer to it?" said the March Hare.

14 "Exactly so," said Alice.

15 "Then you should say what you mean," the March Hare went on.

16 "I do," Alice hastily replied; "at least--at least I mean what I say--that's the same thing, you know."

17 "Not the same thing a bit!" said the Hatter. "You might just as well say that 'I see what I eat' is the same thing as 'I eat what I see'!"

 

 

Carroll uses a lot of contractions in this passage. 

Which of the examples below shows the correct use of a contraction?

CORRECT ANSWER
He's going outside.
EDDIE SAYS
The answer is e. A contraction means that you shorten the second word and use an apostrophe in the place of the missing letter.
  • Question 24

COMPREHENSION 

Read the passage below.  

For this first section (questions 1 - 27), you will be asked questions to demonstrate your understanding of the text. 

 

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Chapter 7

 

1 There was a table set out under a tree in front of the house, and the March Hare and the Hatter were having tea at it: a Dormouse was sitting between them, fast asleep, and the other two were using it as a cushion, resting their elbows on it, and talking over its head. "Very uncomfortable for the Dormouse," thought Alice; "only, as it's asleep, I suppose it doesn't mind."

2 The table was a large one, but the three were all crowded together at one corner of it: "No room! No room!" they cried out when they saw Alice coming. "There's plenty of room!" said Alice indignantly, and she sat down in a large arm-chair at one end of the table.

3 "Have some wine," the March Hare said in an encouraging tone.

4 Alice looked all round the table, but there was nothing on it but tea. "I don't see any wine," she remarked.

5 "There isn't any," said the March Hare.

6 "Then it wasn't very civil of you to offer it," said Alice angrily.

7 "It wasn't very civil of you to sit down without being invited," said the March Hare.

8 "I didn't know it was your table," said Alice; "it's laid for a great many more than three."

9 "Your hair wants cutting," said the Hatter. He had been looking at Alice for some time with great curiosity, and this was his first speech.

10 "You should learn not to make personal remarks," Alice said with some severity; "it's very rude."

11 The Hatter opened his eyes very wide on hearing this; but all he said was, "Why is a raven like a writing-desk?"

12 "Come, we shall have some fun now!" thought Alice. "I'm glad they've begun asking riddles.--I believe I can guess that," she added aloud.

13 "Do you mean that you think you can find out the answer to it?" said the March Hare.

14 "Exactly so," said Alice.

15 "Then you should say what you mean," the March Hare went on.

16 "I do," Alice hastily replied; "at least--at least I mean what I say--that's the same thing, you know."

17 "Not the same thing a bit!" said the Hatter. "You might just as well say that 'I see what I eat' is the same thing as 'I eat what I see'!"

 

 

In this passage, there is a lot of speech that is one line long by the different characters. 

 

What is the effect of this on the reader?

CORRECT ANSWER
It makes the reader increase the pace so that it reflects the quick exchange at the table.
EDDIE SAYS
The answer is b. The way this is written shows the fast exchange, and back and forth between Alice and the other characters in this part of the text.
  • Question 25

COMPREHENSION 

 

Read the passage below.  

 

For this first section (questions 1 - 27), you will be asked questions to demonstrate your understanding of the text. 

 

 

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Chapter 7

 

1 There was a table set out under a tree in front of the house, and the March Hare and the Hatter were having tea at it: a Dormouse was sitting between them, fast asleep, and the other two were using it as a cushion, resting their elbows on it, and talking over its head. "Very uncomfortable for the Dormouse," thought Alice; "only, as it's asleep, I suppose it doesn't mind."

2 The table was a large one, but the three were all crowded together at one corner of it: "No room! No room!" they cried out when they saw Alice coming. "There's plenty of room!" said Alice indignantly, and she sat down in a large arm-chair at one end of the table.

3 "Have some wine," the March Hare said in an encouraging tone.

4 Alice looked all round the table, but there was nothing on it but tea. "I don't see any wine," she remarked.

5 "There isn't any," said the March Hare.

6 "Then it wasn't very civil of you to offer it," said Alice angrily.

7 "It wasn't very civil of you to sit down without being invited," said the March Hare.

8 "I didn't know it was your table," said Alice; "it's laid for a great many more than three."

9 "Your hair wants cutting," said the Hatter. He had been looking at Alice for some time with great curiosity, and this was his first speech.

10 "You should learn not to make personal remarks," Alice said with some severity; "it's very rude."

11 The Hatter opened his eyes very wide on hearing this; but all he said was, "Why is a raven like a writing-desk?"

12 "Come, we shall have some fun now!" thought Alice. "I'm glad they've begun asking riddles.--I believe I can guess that," she added aloud.

13 "Do you mean that you think you can find out the answer to it?" said the March Hare.

14 "Exactly so," said Alice.

15 "Then you should say what you mean," the March Hare went on.

16 "I do," Alice hastily replied; "at least--at least I mean what I say--that's the same thing, you know."

17 "Not the same thing a bit!" said the Hatter. "You might just as well say that 'I see what I eat' is the same thing as 'I eat what I see'!"

 

 

In line 16, can you identify the noun?

CORRECT ANSWER
'Alice'
EDDIE SAYS
The answer is b. Alice is the noun in this sentence.
  • Question 26

COMPREHENSION 

 

Read the passage below.  

 

For this first section (questions 1 - 27), you will be asked questions to demonstrate your understanding of the text. 

 

 

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Chapter 7

 

1 There was a table set out under a tree in front of the house, and the March Hare and the Hatter were having tea at it: a Dormouse was sitting between them, fast asleep, and the other two were using it as a cushion, resting their elbows on it, and talking over its head. "Very uncomfortable for the Dormouse," thought Alice; "only, as it's asleep, I suppose it doesn't mind."

2 The table was a large one, but the three were all crowded together at one corner of it: "No room! No room!" they cried out when they saw Alice coming. "There's plenty of room!" said Alice indignantly, and she sat down in a large arm-chair at one end of the table.

3 "Have some wine," the March Hare said in an encouraging tone.

4 Alice looked all round the table, but there was nothing on it but tea. "I don't see any wine," she remarked.

5 "There isn't any," said the March Hare.

6 "Then it wasn't very civil of you to offer it," said Alice angrily.

7 "It wasn't very civil of you to sit down without being invited," said the March Hare.

8 "I didn't know it was your table," said Alice; "it's laid for a great many more than three."

9 "Your hair wants cutting," said the Hatter. He had been looking at Alice for some time with great curiosity, and this was his first speech.

10 "You should learn not to make personal remarks," Alice said with some severity; "it's very rude."

11 The Hatter opened his eyes very wide on hearing this; but all he said was, "Why is a raven like a writing-desk?"

12 "Come, we shall have some fun now!" thought Alice. "I'm glad they've begun asking riddles.--I believe I can guess that," she added aloud.

13 "Do you mean that you think you can find out the answer to it?" said the March Hare.

14 "Exactly so," said Alice.

15 "Then you should say what you mean," the March Hare went on.

16 "I do," Alice hastily replied; "at least--at least I mean what I say--that's the same thing, you know."

17 "Not the same thing a bit!" said the Hatter. "You might just as well say that 'I see what I eat' is the same thing as 'I eat what I see'!"

 

 

Throughout the passage, we get to know some of the characters better. 

Which character is the most antagonistic towards Alice?

CORRECT ANSWER
March Hare
EDDIE SAYS
The answer is a. On three occasions in this passage, he goads Alice: 1 - He offers her non-existent wine. 2 - He tells her she shouldn't have sat at a table where she was not invited. 3 - He tells her she should say what she means when she thinks that she has.
  • Question 27

COMPREHENSION 

 

Read the passage below.  

 

For this first section (questions 1 - 27), you will be asked questions to demonstrate your understanding of the text. 

 

 

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Chapter 7

 

1 There was a table set out under a tree in front of the house, and the March Hare and the Hatter were having tea at it: a Dormouse was sitting between them, fast asleep, and the other two were using it as a cushion, resting their elbows on it, and talking over its head. "Very uncomfortable for the Dormouse," thought Alice; "only, as it's asleep, I suppose it doesn't mind."

2 The table was a large one, but the three were all crowded together at one corner of it: "No room! No room!" they cried out when they saw Alice coming. "There's plenty of room!" said Alice indignantly, and she sat down in a large arm-chair at one end of the table.

3 "Have some wine," the March Hare said in an encouraging tone.

4 Alice looked all round the table, but there was nothing on it but tea. "I don't see any wine," she remarked.

5 "There isn't any," said the March Hare.

6 "Then it wasn't very civil of you to offer it," said Alice angrily.

7 "It wasn't very civil of you to sit down without being invited," said the March Hare.

8 "I didn't know it was your table," said Alice; "it's laid for a great many more than three."

9 "Your hair wants cutting," said the Hatter. He had been looking at Alice for some time with great curiosity, and this was his first speech.

10 "You should learn not to make personal remarks," Alice said with some severity; "it's very rude."

11 The Hatter opened his eyes very wide on hearing this; but all he said was, "Why is a raven like a writing-desk?"

12 "Come, we shall have some fun now!" thought Alice. "I'm glad they've begun asking riddles.--I believe I can guess that," she added aloud.

13 "Do you mean that you think you can find out the answer to it?" said the March Hare.

14 "Exactly so," said Alice.

15 "Then you should say what you mean," the March Hare went on.

16 "I do," Alice hastily replied; "at least--at least I mean what I say--that's the same thing, you know."

17 "Not the same thing a bit!" said the Hatter. "You might just as well say that 'I see what I eat' is the same thing as 'I eat what I see'!"

 

 

Alice is excited about the 'riddle'.

Which of the options below explains what a riddle is in the context here?

CORRECT ANSWER
A type of poem that looks like a puzzle.
EDDIE SAYS
The answer is e. A riddle in this context is a puzzle that needs to be solved using the clues in the sentences.
  • Question 28

PUNCTUATION

For questions 28 - 35, you will need to read through the sentence below and identify whether or not each section contains a punctuation error.  

 

Identify where it occurs in the sentence using the labels A, B, C or D, as shown above the sentence.

 

 

A B C D
I wont go  to the supermarket this  morning because I don't have enough time.
CORRECT ANSWER
A
EDDIE SAYS
The answer is a. 'I wont' should be written as 'I won't' as it is a contraction, so there is an apostrophe missing.
  • Question 29

PUNCTUATION

For questions 28 - 35 you will need to read through the sentence below and identify whether or not each section contains a punctuation error.

  

Identify where it occurs in the sentence using the labels A, B, C or D, as shown above the sentence.

 

A B C D
Molly asked, Grandma, is it  ok to take Rex  for a walk?"
CORRECT ANSWER
B
EDDIE SAYS
The answer is b. As Molly is speaking, speech marks should appear before her first word.
  • Question 30

PUNCTUATION

For questions 28 - 35 you will need to read through the sentence below and identify whether or not each section contains a punctuation error.  

 

Identify where it occurs in the sentence using the labels A, B, C or D, as shown above the sentence.

 

A B C D
Claire had football  training on a Monday, Tuesday Wednesday and Thursday.
CORRECT ANSWER
C
EDDIE SAYS
The answer is c. There should be a comma between Tuesday and Wednesday, as this is a list.
  • Question 31

PUNCTUATION

For questions 28 - 35 you will need to read through the sentence below and identify whether or not each section contains a punctuation error.  

 

Identify where it occurs in the sentence using the labels A, B, C or D, as shown above the sentence.

 

A B C D
Thomas and his  friends went to the cinema to watch the  latest superhero film

 

CORRECT ANSWER
D
EDDIE SAYS
The answer is d. There should be a full stop at the end of the sentence.
  • Question 32

PUNCTUATION

For questions 28 - 35 you will need to read through the sentence below and identify whether or not each section contains a punctuation error.  

 

Identify where it occurs in the sentence using the labels A, B, C or D, as shown above the sentence.

 

A B C D
Mrs. Taylors class were being particularly noisy on Wednesday  following the assembly.

 

CORRECT ANSWER
A
EDDIE SAYS
The answer is a. The class belong to Mrs. Taylor, therefore there should be an apostrophe present to show possession.
  • Question 33

PUNCTUATION

For questions 28 - 35, you will need to read through the sentence below and identify whether or not each section contains a punctuation error.  

 

Identify where it occurs in the sentence using the labels A, B, C or D, as shown above the sentence.

 

A B C D
Did you know that the clocks will change in two weeks.
CORRECT ANSWER
D
EDDIE SAYS
The answer is d. This is a question, so the end of the sentence should have a question mark.
  • Question 34

PUNCTUATION

For questions 28 - 35, you will need to read through the sentence below and identify whether or not each section contains a punctuation error.  

 

Identify where it occurs in the sentence using the labels A, B, C or D, as shown above the sentence.

 

A B C D
It was a  blustery day on the  farm and all of the  cows were lying down.
CORRECT ANSWER
There are no punctuation errors.
EDDIE SAYS
The answer is e. There are no punctuation errors in this sentence.
  • Question 35

PUNCTUATION

For questions 28 - 35, you will need to read through the sentence below and identify whether or not each section contains a punctuation error.  

 

Identify where it occurs in the sentence using the labels A, B, C or D, as shown above the sentence.

 

A B C D
Jenny (my friend that lives next door has said that we can take her dog  for a walk tomorrow.
CORRECT ANSWER
B
EDDIE SAYS
The answer is b. The bracket should be closed after (my friend that lives next door) as this part of the sentence is an aside. This means that this section could be removed from the sentence and it would still make complete sense.
  • Question 36

SPELLING 

(Sentence taken from Cinderella by the Grim Brothers)

 

For questions 36 - 43, you will need to read through the sentence below and identify whether or not it contains a spelling error. 

 

If you believe there is an error, you should identify where it occurs using the sections A, B, C or D as shown above the sentence.

 

A B C D
The woman  had brought with her  into the house  too daughters,
CORRECT ANSWER
D
EDDIE SAYS
The answer is d. The word 'too' should be 'two' in this context.
  • Question 37

SPELLING 

(Sentence taken from Cinderella by The Grim Brothers

 

For questions 36 - 43, you will need to read through the sentence below and identify whether or not it contains a spelling error. 

 

If you believe there is an error, you should identify where it occurs using the sections A, B, C or D as shown above the sentence.

 

A B C D
who were beautiful  and fair of face,  but vyle and black of heart. 
CORRECT ANSWER
C
EDDIE SAYS
The answer is d. The word 'vyle' is incorrectly spelt, it should read as 'vile'.
  • Question 38

SPELLING  

(Sentence taken from Cinderella by The Grim Brothers)

 

For questions 36 - 43, you will need to read through the sentence below and identify whether or not it contains a spelling error. 

 

If you believe there is an error, you should identify where it occurs using the sections A, B, C or D as shown above the sentence.

 

A B C D
Now began  a bad  time for the poor  step-child.
CORRECT ANSWER
There are no spelling errors.
EDDIE SAYS
The answer is e. This sentence is spelling error free!
  • Question 39

SPELLING 

(Sentence taken from Cinderella by The Grim Brothers)

 

For questions 36 - 43, you will need to read through the sentence below and identify whether or not it contains a spelling error. 

 

If you believe there is an error, you should identify where it occurs using the sections A, B, C or D as shown the sentence.

 

A B C D
"Is the stupid  goose to sit  in the parlor with us?"  they said.
CORRECT ANSWER
C
EDDIE SAYS
The answer is c. The word 'parlor' is spelt 'parlour'. This is an old fashioned word meaning a room in which the upper classes sat with their visitors.
  • Question 40

SPELLING 

(Sentence taken from Cinderella by The Grim Brothers)

 

For questions 36 - 43, you will need to read through the sentence below and identify whether or not it contains a spelling error. 

 

If you believe there is an error, you should identify where it occurs using the sections A, B, C or D as shown above the sentence.

 

A B C D
They took her pretty clothes,  put an old, gray  dress on her, and gave  her wooden shoes.
CORRECT ANSWER
B
EDDIE SAYS
The answer is b. The word 'gray' should be spelt 'grey'. This is the colour of her dress and in British English is spelt in this way.
  • Question 41

SPELLING 

(Sentence taken from Cinderella by The Grim Brothers

 

For questions 36 - 43, you will need to read through the sentence below and identify whether or not it contains a spelling error. 

 

If you believe there is an error, you should identify where it occurs using the sections A, B, C or D as shown above the sentence.

 

A B C D
"Just look at the proud  Princess" they cried, and  laughed, and lead  her into the kitchen.
CORRECT ANSWER
C
EDDIE SAYS
The answer is c. The word 'lead' should be spelt 'led'. 'Led' is the past tense of the word 'lead'. 'Lead' is also a homophone of 'led' but this spelling means a type of metal which does not make sense in this context.
  • Question 42

SPELLING 

(Sentence taken from Cinderella by The Grim Brothers)

 

For questions 36 - 43, you will need to read through the sentence below and identify whether or not it contains a spelling error. 

 

If you believe there is an error, you should identify where it occurs using the sections A, B, C or D as shown above the sentence.

 

A B C D
Their she had to work  from morning till night,  carrying water, lighting  fires, cooking and washing.
CORRECT ANSWER
A
EDDIE SAYS
The answer is a. The word 'their' should be spelt 'there'. Remember there are 3 words that sound the same here: There = in, at, place or position. Their = belonging to or associated with people. They're = a contraction of 'they are'. In this instance, 'there' is the correct option.
  • Question 43

SPELLING 

(Sentence taken from Cinderella by The Grim Brothers

 

For questions 36 - 43, you will need to read through the sentence below and identify whether or not it contains a spelling error. 

 

If you believe there is an error, you should identify where it occurs using the sections A, B, C or D as shown above the sentence.

 

A B C D
The sisters were   so unkind.  They mocked  her and made her work untill she was weary.

 

 
CORRECT ANSWER
D
EDDIE SAYS
The answer is d. The word 'untill' should be spelt 'until' with only one 'L'.
  • Question 44

For questions 44 - 52, you need to select the word that is most appropriate to complete the sentence.

 

The scientific name for a Giraffe is a Giraffa camelopardalis, and they are most commonly ( ____ ) in Africa.

CORRECT ANSWER
Found
EDDIE SAYS
The answer is d. The word 'found' makes the most grammatical sense in the context of the question.
  • Question 45

For questions 44 - 52, you need to select the word that is most appropriate to complete the sentence.

 

Giraffes have only seven ( ____ ) in their necks, which is the same number as humans.

CORRECT ANSWER
Vertebrae
EDDIE SAYS
The answer is e. A vertebra is one small bone that makes up part of the spine. Vertebrae is the plural of vertebra, to describe the collection of small-sized bones making up the spine and protecting the spinal cord in humans. A giraffe's neck is made up of vertebrae. As a giraffe has 7 vertebra, we would use the plural word vertebrae.
  • Question 46

For questions 44 - 52, you need to select the word that is most appropriate to complete the sentence.

 

Giraffes are the tallest animals in the world and can reach as high as 6 ( ____ ).

CORRECT ANSWER
Metres
EDDIE SAYS
The answer is c. A giraffe can be as tall as 6 m, that's about half as tall as a telephone pole! The clue in this sentence is the word high, it couldn't be tonne, stone or kilogram as these are units for weight. And, we know 6 cm is really far too tiny for a giraffe (this would fit inside your pencil case!).
  • Question 47

For questions 44 - 52, you need to select the word that is most appropriate to complete the sentence.

 

Giraffes have long, black tongues that can ( ____ ) 50 cm in length.

CORRECT ANSWER
Measure
EDDIE SAYS
The answer is b. 50 cm is nearly as long as two 30cm rulers! They need this tongue that MEASURES 50 cm to eat leaves that are up high.
  • Question 48

For questions 44 - 52, you need to select the word that is most appropriate to complete the sentence.

 

In terms of diet, giraffes are ( ____ ).

CORRECT ANSWER
Vegetarians
EDDIE SAYS
The answer is b. Giraffes only eat plants and not other animals, so you'd be safe in terms of not being eaten, but they can still attack!
  • Question 49

For questions 44 - 52, you need to select the word that is most appropriate to complete the sentence.

 

A ( ____ ) giraffe is called a bull.

CORRECT ANSWER
Male
EDDIE SAYS
The answer is b. Male giraffes are called bulls just like male elephants and cows!
  • Question 50

For questions 44 - 52, you need to select the word that is most appropriate to complete the sentence.

 

To establish a pecking order, male giraffes will take part in ( ____ ) wrestling.

CORRECT ANSWER
Neck
EDDIE SAYS
The answer is a. Giraffes will fight by using their necks, and the sound is pretty loud!
  • Question 51

For questions 44 - 52, you need to select the word that is most appropriate to complete the sentence.

 

An adult giraffe can ( ____ ) at speeds of 34 miles per hour.

CORRECT ANSWER
Gallop
EDDIE SAYS
The answer is c. Pretty quick, isn't it?
  • Question 52

For questions 44 - 52, you need to select the word that is most appropriate to complete the sentence.

 

Giraffes will ( ____ ) off predators by kicking with their fore or hind legs.

CORRECT ANSWER
Fend
EDDIE SAYS
The answer is d. Fend means to try to keep something at bay or to hold it off. A giraffe is so strong, that it's kick could break the back of a lion.
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