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Year 2 Revision: Grammar, Punctuation and Spelling - Level 1

In this worksheet, students revise the Year 2 grammar, punctuation and spelling objectives.

'Year 2 Revision: Grammar, Punctuation and Spelling - Level 1' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 1

Curriculum topic:  Revision

Curriculum subtopic:  Year 2 Revision

Difficulty level:  

down

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

 

In Year 2 you will have learnt a lot of different things in your English and Literacy lessons.

 

In this worksheet you can go over most of the objectives for grammar, punctuation and spelling, giving you the opportunity to check what you have learnt and what you still need to practise.

When we write sentences we need to remember to punctuate them. All sentences begin with a capital letter, and they end with a full stop, a question mark or an exclamation mark.

 

Match up the punctuation mark with its name.

Column A

Column B

.
full stop
?
exclamation mark
!
question mark

When we speak, we often run words together, saying things like 'I didn't go', rather than 'I did not go'.

We use an apostrophe in these words to show where a letter has been missed out.

 

Look at the list of words below. Which one is the correct spelling of the word we get when we put the two words should not together?

shouldent

shouldn't

should'nt

shouldnt

Look at the picture and the sentence below.

 

In my lunch box I had a roll, a chocolate bar, some fruit and a drink.

 

Commas have been used to separate the items in the list of food.

 

Which sentence in the list below uses commas correctly to separate the items in the list?

My favourite fruits, are apples bananas and grapes.

My favourite fruits are apples bananas and grapes.

My favourite fruits are apples, bananas and grapes.

Nouns, verbs and adjectives are all different types of words.

 

 

The names of people, places and things are nouns. They are sometimes called naming words.

My little dog fetched his stick.

 

A verb describes an action. Verbs are sometimes called doing words.

My little dog fetched his stick.

 

An adjective describes a noun. Adjectives are sometimes called describing words.

My little dog fetched his stick.

 


What type of word is 'angry' in the sentence below?

 

The angry farmer chased the rabbit out of the field.

noun

verb

adjective

Homophones are words that sound the same but have different meanings and are often spelt differently. It is easy to get confused between the homophones to, too and two.

 

The easiest one to remember is probably two, which is just the spelling of the number 2.

Katie has two brothers.

 

Too means 'as well', and we also use this spelling for things like 'too much' and 'too tired'.

Jack ate too much pudding, and Josie did too.

 

We use to for all the other meanings of the word.

 

 

Choose the correct spelling of the missing word in the following sentence.

 

My best friend is going to Disney World and I want to go __________.

to

too

two

We use the present tense to talk and write about things that are happening now.

Molly goes swimming every week.

Liam is wearing his new jacket.

 

We use the past tense to talk and write about things that have already happened.

Molly went swimming yesterday.

Liam wore his new jacket on Friday.

 

 

Read the sentence below and decide whether it is in the present tense or the past tense.

 

Andrew played his guitar in the school concert last Thursday.

present tense

past tense

A compound word is a word made by putting together two other words. For example:

play + ground = playground

air + port = airport

 

 

The following sentence contains a compound word. Find it and write it in the answer box.

 

The teacher wrote the answers on the whiteboard.

A suffix is a letter or group of letters added to the end of a word to make a new word.

If we add the suffix -ment to the word enjoy, we get a new word: enjoyment.

 

Add the suffix -less to the word care to make a new word and write it in the answer box.

Statements and questions are different types of sentences.

 

A statement is a sentence that gives information.

It is raining today.

Carla likes ice cream.

 

A question is a sentence that needs an answer. It ends with a question mark.

How old are you?

Are we there yet?

 

 

Read the sentence below and decide whether it is a statement or a question.

 

How long it is until bed time?

statement

question

The word kite is a noun.

 

If we add more information to the noun it becomes a noun phrase.

a red, yellow and blue kite with a long tail

 

 

Look at the sentence below and then tick the noun phrase.

 

The shiny red car raced through London at top speed.

the shiny red car

raced through

at top speed

Look at this list of words. They all end in the sound 'shun' but it is spelt -tion.

station

fiction

collection

 

 

Read the sentence below and listen to the sound clip then choose the correct spelling of the missing word.

I went into hospital for an __________ on my knee.

operashun

operation

operatian

An adjective is a describing word. In the following sentence, the word tall is an adjective.

Josie is tall.

 

If we want to compare two things, we add -er to make a new adjective.

Josie is tall, but Jack is taller.

 

If we are comparing three or more things, we add -est.

Kayla is the tallest of all of them.

 

 

Read the sentence below and write the missing word in the answer box.

 

In December it was cold. In January it was colder, but February was the __________  month of all.

Look at the following sentences.

Joanna likes peas. Katie hates peas.
 

They can be joined together as one sentence using the conjunction but.

Joanna likes peas but Katie hates peas.

 

Use the word but to join the two sentences below and write your new sentence out in the answer box. Don't forget to start it with a capital letter and finish it with a full stop.

 

Jonny likes football. Kieran prefers cricket.

There are many rules to help us spell words, but some words don't follow the rules and simply have to be learnt.

 

Listen to the word by clicking on the sound button and then write it in the answer box.

Look at the following sentences.

 

Layla practises her clarinet every night.

Layla is practising her clarinet in her bedroom.

 

They are both in the present tense, but the second one uses 'is practising' to show us that she is doing it right now.

 

 

Now look at the sentences below and write the missing word in the answer box.

 

Jordan plays football every Monday night.

Jordan is __________ football at the moment.

When we write sentences we need to remember to punctuate them. All sentences begin with a capital letter, but they can end with a full stop, a question mark or an exclamation mark depending on what type of sentence they are.

 

If we are asking a question we need a question mark.

 

If the sentence shows surprise, excitement or anger we use an exclamation mark.

 

 

The following sentence has not been punctuated correctly. Write it out again in the answer box.

 

are you listening to me

We can write sentences in the present tense to show that things are happening now, or in the past tense to show that they have already happened, but it is important to be consistent. This means that we stick to the tense we have chosen and do not keep swapping between the present and the past tenses.

 

Look at the sentences below. All the verbs are in bold.

Miriam has a pet rabbit called Floppy. She loves Floppy very much and cleans out her cage every day. When she comes home from school she always took her out of her cage and strokes her.

 

The writing is in the present tense, but one of the verbs is in the past tense by mistake. Which one?

has

loves

cleans

comes

took

strokes

Look at the following words. They all end in the j sound, but the letter j is not used to make the sound.

badge

edge

bridge

dodge

 

Now read the sentence below and write the missing word in the answer box. Think carefully about how to spell it.

It was raining all day so we did some cooking indoors. Dad helped us to make __________.

  • Question 1

When we write sentences we need to remember to punctuate them. All sentences begin with a capital letter, and they end with a full stop, a question mark or an exclamation mark.

 

Match up the punctuation mark with its name.

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

.
full stop
?
question mark
!
exclamation mark
EDDIE SAYS
We use a question mark when we are asking a question. We use an exclamation mark when we are excited, angry or surprised.
  • Question 2

When we speak, we often run words together, saying things like 'I didn't go', rather than 'I did not go'.

We use an apostrophe in these words to show where a letter has been missed out.

 

Look at the list of words below. Which one is the correct spelling of the word we get when we put the two words should not together?

CORRECT ANSWER
shouldn't
EDDIE SAYS
We need to put an apostrophe between the n and the t to show that the o has been missed out.
  • Question 3

Look at the picture and the sentence below.

 

In my lunch box I had a roll, a chocolate bar, some fruit and a drink.

 

Commas have been used to separate the items in the list of food.

 

Which sentence in the list below uses commas correctly to separate the items in the list?

CORRECT ANSWER
My favourite fruits are apples, bananas and grapes.
EDDIE SAYS
We need to put a comma after the word 'apples' to separate it from the next item on the list, 'bananas'. We don't need a comma after 'bananas' because we have the word 'and' instead. There is no need for a comma before the list starts.
  • Question 4

Nouns, verbs and adjectives are all different types of words.

 

 

The names of people, places and things are nouns. They are sometimes called naming words.

My little dog fetched his stick.

 

A verb describes an action. Verbs are sometimes called doing words.

My little dog fetched his stick.

 

An adjective describes a noun. Adjectives are sometimes called describing words.

My little dog fetched his stick.

 


What type of word is 'angry' in the sentence below?

 

The angry farmer chased the rabbit out of the field.

CORRECT ANSWER
adjective
EDDIE SAYS
The word 'angry' is an adjective because it is giving more information about the noun 'farmer'.
  • Question 5

Homophones are words that sound the same but have different meanings and are often spelt differently. It is easy to get confused between the homophones to, too and two.

 

The easiest one to remember is probably two, which is just the spelling of the number 2.

Katie has two brothers.

 

Too means 'as well', and we also use this spelling for things like 'too much' and 'too tired'.

Jack ate too much pudding, and Josie did too.

 

We use to for all the other meanings of the word.

 

 

Choose the correct spelling of the missing word in the following sentence.

 

My best friend is going to Disney World and I want to go __________.

CORRECT ANSWER
too
EDDIE SAYS
The word means 'as well' in this sentence, so the correct spelling is 'too'.
  • Question 6

We use the present tense to talk and write about things that are happening now.

Molly goes swimming every week.

Liam is wearing his new jacket.

 

We use the past tense to talk and write about things that have already happened.

Molly went swimming yesterday.

Liam wore his new jacket on Friday.

 

 

Read the sentence below and decide whether it is in the present tense or the past tense.

 

Andrew played his guitar in the school concert last Thursday.

CORRECT ANSWER
past tense
EDDIE SAYS
The verb 'played' is in the past tense. The concert was last Thursday so it has already happened.
  • Question 7

A compound word is a word made by putting together two other words. For example:

play + ground = playground

air + port = airport

 

 

The following sentence contains a compound word. Find it and write it in the answer box.

 

The teacher wrote the answers on the whiteboard.

CORRECT ANSWER
whiteboard
EDDIE SAYS
The word 'whiteboard' is formed by putting together the words 'white' and 'board'.
  • Question 8

A suffix is a letter or group of letters added to the end of a word to make a new word.

If we add the suffix -ment to the word enjoy, we get a new word: enjoyment.

 

Add the suffix -less to the word care to make a new word and write it in the answer box.

CORRECT ANSWER
careless
EDDIE SAYS
If you are careless it means that you do something without taking care over it.
  • Question 9

Statements and questions are different types of sentences.

 

A statement is a sentence that gives information.

It is raining today.

Carla likes ice cream.

 

A question is a sentence that needs an answer. It ends with a question mark.

How old are you?

Are we there yet?

 

 

Read the sentence below and decide whether it is a statement or a question.

 

How long it is until bed time?

CORRECT ANSWER
question
EDDIE SAYS
The speaker wants to know something so this is a question. It ends with a question mark.
  • Question 10

The word kite is a noun.

 

If we add more information to the noun it becomes a noun phrase.

a red, yellow and blue kite with a long tail

 

 

Look at the sentence below and then tick the noun phrase.

 

The shiny red car raced through London at top speed.

CORRECT ANSWER
the shiny red car
EDDIE SAYS
'The shiny red car' is a noun phrase. It gives more information about the car.
  • Question 11

Look at this list of words. They all end in the sound 'shun' but it is spelt -tion.

station

fiction

collection

 

 

Read the sentence below and listen to the sound clip then choose the correct spelling of the missing word.

I went into hospital for an __________ on my knee.

CORRECT ANSWER
operation
EDDIE SAYS
Like the other words in the list, 'operation' ends in the letters -tion.
  • Question 12

An adjective is a describing word. In the following sentence, the word tall is an adjective.

Josie is tall.

 

If we want to compare two things, we add -er to make a new adjective.

Josie is tall, but Jack is taller.

 

If we are comparing three or more things, we add -est.

Kayla is the tallest of all of them.

 

 

Read the sentence below and write the missing word in the answer box.

 

In December it was cold. In January it was colder, but February was the __________  month of all.

CORRECT ANSWER
coldest
EDDIE SAYS
We add the suffix -est to the adjective 'cold' to make the new word.
  • Question 13

Look at the following sentences.

Joanna likes peas. Katie hates peas.
 

They can be joined together as one sentence using the conjunction but.

Joanna likes peas but Katie hates peas.

 

Use the word but to join the two sentences below and write your new sentence out in the answer box. Don't forget to start it with a capital letter and finish it with a full stop.

 

Jonny likes football. Kieran prefers cricket.

CORRECT ANSWER
Jonny likes football but Kieran prefers cricket.
EDDIE SAYS
We use the word 'but' to join two clauses, or sentences, when they are contrasting with each other. If they agreed with each other we would use the word 'and'. Jonny likes football and Kieran does too.
  • Question 14

There are many rules to help us spell words, but some words don't follow the rules and simply have to be learnt.

 

Listen to the word by clicking on the sound button and then write it in the answer box.

CORRECT ANSWER
because
EDDIE SAYS
This is a tricky word to spell but it is important to learn it because we use it a lot. Some people remember it as the first letters of each word in the following saying: Big Elephants Can Always Understand Small Elephants.
  • Question 15

Look at the following sentences.

 

Layla practises her clarinet every night.

Layla is practising her clarinet in her bedroom.

 

They are both in the present tense, but the second one uses 'is practising' to show us that she is doing it right now.

 

 

Now look at the sentences below and write the missing word in the answer box.

 

Jordan plays football every Monday night.

Jordan is __________ football at the moment.

CORRECT ANSWER
playing
EDDIE SAYS
We use 'is playing' to show that he is doing it right now.
  • Question 16

When we write sentences we need to remember to punctuate them. All sentences begin with a capital letter, but they can end with a full stop, a question mark or an exclamation mark depending on what type of sentence they are.

 

If we are asking a question we need a question mark.

 

If the sentence shows surprise, excitement or anger we use an exclamation mark.

 

 

The following sentence has not been punctuated correctly. Write it out again in the answer box.

 

are you listening to me

CORRECT ANSWER
Are you listening to me?
EDDIE SAYS
This sentence is a question so it needs a question mark.
  • Question 17

We can write sentences in the present tense to show that things are happening now, or in the past tense to show that they have already happened, but it is important to be consistent. This means that we stick to the tense we have chosen and do not keep swapping between the present and the past tenses.

 

Look at the sentences below. All the verbs are in bold.

Miriam has a pet rabbit called Floppy. She loves Floppy very much and cleans out her cage every day. When she comes home from school she always took her out of her cage and strokes her.

 

The writing is in the present tense, but one of the verbs is in the past tense by mistake. Which one?

CORRECT ANSWER
took
EDDIE SAYS
The word 'took' is in the past tense. To be consistent with the rest of the writing it should be 'takes'.
  • Question 18

Look at the following words. They all end in the j sound, but the letter j is not used to make the sound.

badge

edge

bridge

dodge

 

Now read the sentence below and write the missing word in the answer box. Think carefully about how to spell it.

It was raining all day so we did some cooking indoors. Dad helped us to make __________.

CORRECT ANSWER
fudge
EDDIE SAYS
The letters -dge are used to make the j sound at the end of the word.
---- OR ----

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