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Grammar: Active, Interrogative and Imperative Sentences 1

In this worksheet, students practise identifying active, interrogative and imperative forms of sentences.

'Grammar: Active, Interrogative and Imperative Sentences 1' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:  Writing: Composition

Curriculum subtopic:  Assess Effect and Meaning

Difficulty level:  

down

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

Sentences can be statements, questions or orders.

Kim is doing the washing up. (statement)

Is Kim doing the washing up? (question)

Do the washing up! (order)

 

These types of sentences are also known as active (statements), interrogative (questions) and imperative (orders).

Decide whether the following sentence is active (a statement), interrogative (a question) or imperative (an order).


Are you coming to my house?

active

interrogative

imperative

Decide whether the following sentence is active (a statement), interrogative (a question) or imperative (an order).

 

Stop that now!

active

interrogative

imperative

Decide whether the following sentence is active (a statement), interrogative (a question) or imperative (an order).


I live in Liverpool.

active

interrogative

imperative

Decide whether the following sentence is active (a statement), interrogative (a question) or imperative (an order).


I've always loved painting.

active

interrogative

imperative

Decide whether the following sentence is active (a statement), interrogative (a question) or imperative (an order).

 

Do you take sugar in your tea?

active

interrogative

imperative

Decide whether the following sentence is active, interrogative or imperative.

 

Wait for me!

active

interrogative

imperative

Decide whether the following sentence is active, interrogative or imperative.

 

I don't like it when it rains all day.

active

interrogative

imperative

Decide whether the following sentence is active, interrogative or imperative.

 

Please come here now.

active

interrogative

imperative

Decide whether the following sentence is active, interrogative or imperative

 

Can you help me, please?

active

interrogative

imperative

Decide whether the following sentence is active, interrogative or imperative.

 

I don't understand much French.

active

interrogative

imperative

  • Question 1

Decide whether the following sentence is active (a statement), interrogative (a question) or imperative (an order).


Are you coming to my house?

CORRECT ANSWER
interrogative
  • Question 2

Decide whether the following sentence is active (a statement), interrogative (a question) or imperative (an order).

 

Stop that now!

CORRECT ANSWER
imperative
  • Question 3

Decide whether the following sentence is active (a statement), interrogative (a question) or imperative (an order).


I live in Liverpool.

CORRECT ANSWER
active
  • Question 4

Decide whether the following sentence is active (a statement), interrogative (a question) or imperative (an order).


I've always loved painting.

CORRECT ANSWER
active
  • Question 5

Decide whether the following sentence is active (a statement), interrogative (a question) or imperative (an order).

 

Do you take sugar in your tea?

CORRECT ANSWER
interrogative
  • Question 6

Decide whether the following sentence is active, interrogative or imperative.

 

Wait for me!

CORRECT ANSWER
imperative
  • Question 7

Decide whether the following sentence is active, interrogative or imperative.

 

I don't like it when it rains all day.

CORRECT ANSWER
active
  • Question 8

Decide whether the following sentence is active, interrogative or imperative.

 

Please come here now.

CORRECT ANSWER
imperative
EDDIE SAYS
Even though the person is saying 'please' they are still giving an order so it is imperative.
  • Question 9

Decide whether the following sentence is active, interrogative or imperative

 

Can you help me, please?

CORRECT ANSWER
interrogative
EDDIE SAYS
This is interrogative because the speaker is asking for help rather than telling someone to help.
  • Question 10

Decide whether the following sentence is active, interrogative or imperative.

 

I don't understand much French.

CORRECT ANSWER
active
---- OR ----

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