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Understand Verb Prefixes: Dis- 3

In this worksheet, students consider further examples of verbs with the prefix dis-, including some more unusual ones.

'Understand Verb Prefixes: Dis- 3' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:  Writing: Transcription

Curriculum subtopic:  Use Prefixes and Suffixes

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

The prefix dis- can change the meaning of a verb to its opposite.

Jason dislikes peas.

peas

It can also have the meaning of removing or reversing something.

Mum disconnected the old computer.

Our team was disqualified from the competition.

 

Other prefixes, such as un-, mis-, in- and re-, can also have a similar meaning and it can be hard to know which one to use. For example, if you give someone the wrong information, are you disinforming them or misinforming them? The correct word is misinform, but there is no easy way of working it out. You may need a dictionary to help you.

 

In this worksheet you will be looking at some more unusual words with the prefix dis- and also deciding whether it is the correct prefix to use or not.

Choose the correct verb to complete the following sentence.

 

The model was __________ and put back into its box.

discovered

dismantled

disembarked

disarranged

Which of the verbs below has the meaning of damaging someone's reputation?

discard

disbelieve

discredit

disclose

Which of the verbs below has the meaning of persuading somebody that their beliefs or views are mistaken?

discourage

dishonour

disabuse

dismay

Sometimes a word can have two similar but slightly different meanings. Which verb can be used to complete both of the sentences below?

 

The company __________ all responsibility for the accident and refused to pay any compensation.

The earl __________ his title and became known simply as Mr Smith.

disrespected

dishonoured

disobeyed

disclaimed

Sometimes a word can have both a literal and a figurative meaning. Which verb can be used to complete both the following sentences?

 

The criminals were __________ and taken to the police station.

She was __________ by his friendly nature and forgot that they had been enemies.

discouraged

disarmed

disturbed

discontented

Sometimes it is hard to work out the meaning of a verb with the prefix dis- because the root word is no longer used on its own. Which word from the list can be used to complete the following sentence?

 

Jake was __________ by the angry look on his teacher's face and couldn't remember what he wanted to say.

discontented

disconcerted

disbursed

discarded

Sometimes it can be hard to know which prefix to choose when turning a root verb into its opposite. As well as dis-, there are other prefixes that can have the same meaning, and sometimes the only way to be sure is to check with a dictionary.

 

If you give someone the wrong information, which is the correct verb?

uninform

disinform

misinform

ininform

Choose the correct word to complete the sentence below.

 

Freya __________ from her horse and led it into the stable.

unmounted

remounted

dismounted

inmounted

Which is the correct word this time?

 

If you __________ orders you will be sacked from the team.

unobey

disobey

inobey

misobey

Sometimes words look like they mean the same thing but in fact they have different meanings. Look at the words below. Two are proper words and one is not. Match up the proper words with their meanings.

Column A

Column B

misuse
to use something in the wrong way
disuse
not a proper word
unuse
to stop using something
  • Question 1

Choose the correct verb to complete the following sentence.

 

The model was __________ and put back into its box.

CORRECT ANSWER
dismantled
EDDIE SAYS
We don't use the verb 'to mantle' any more, but it originally meant to fortify something, so to dismantle was to tear down the fortifications of a castle or similar building.
  • Question 2

Which of the verbs below has the meaning of damaging someone's reputation?

CORRECT ANSWER
discredit
EDDIE SAYS
We tend to think of the word credit in terms of borrowing money, but it originally meant to believe or trust. To discredit someone is to harm their reputation. For example: They told lies about him in order to discredit him.
  • Question 3

Which of the verbs below has the meaning of persuading somebody that their beliefs or views are mistaken?

CORRECT ANSWER
disabuse
EDDIE SAYS
To disabuse sounds like it should mean to stop abusing something, but in fact it means to persuade or convince someone that they are wrong. For example: Katie thought that Jayden was wonderful, but I soon disabused her of that notion.
  • Question 4

Sometimes a word can have two similar but slightly different meanings. Which verb can be used to complete both of the sentences below?

 

The company __________ all responsibility for the accident and refused to pay any compensation.

The earl __________ his title and became known simply as Mr Smith.

CORRECT ANSWER
disclaimed
EDDIE SAYS
To disclaim means to refuse to acknowledge or accept something and is often used in the phrase 'disclaim responsibility', but it can also mean to give up a legal right to something.
  • Question 5

Sometimes a word can have both a literal and a figurative meaning. Which verb can be used to complete both the following sentences?

 

The criminals were __________ and taken to the police station.

She was __________ by his friendly nature and forgot that they had been enemies.

CORRECT ANSWER
disarmed
EDDIE SAYS
Arms in this sense are weapons, so to disarm someone means to take their weapons away from them. In the second sentence it has the figurative meaning of taking away somebody's resistance or suspicion.
  • Question 6

Sometimes it is hard to work out the meaning of a verb with the prefix dis- because the root word is no longer used on its own. Which word from the list can be used to complete the following sentence?

 

Jake was __________ by the angry look on his teacher's face and couldn't remember what he wanted to say.

CORRECT ANSWER
disconcerted
EDDIE SAYS
To disconcert someone is to put them off or unsettle them. The root verb concert meant to bring things together but it is no longer used in this way, apart from in the phrase 'to make a concerted effort'.
  • Question 7

Sometimes it can be hard to know which prefix to choose when turning a root verb into its opposite. As well as dis-, there are other prefixes that can have the same meaning, and sometimes the only way to be sure is to check with a dictionary.

 

If you give someone the wrong information, which is the correct verb?

CORRECT ANSWER
misinform
EDDIE SAYS
Read through the options to see which one you think sounds correct. Remember you can also use a dictionary to help. In this example, mis- is the correct prefix.
  • Question 8

Choose the correct word to complete the sentence below.

 

Freya __________ from her horse and led it into the stable.

CORRECT ANSWER
dismounted
EDDIE SAYS
You got this! To dismount means to get down from something. Remount is also a correct verb but would not fit into the sentence above.
  • Question 9

Which is the correct word this time?

 

If you __________ orders you will be sacked from the team.

CORRECT ANSWER
disobey
EDDIE SAYS
Again you can get a good idea of which word is correct just by reading them to yourself. Which option sounds correct? The opposite of obey is disobey.
  • Question 10

Sometimes words look like they mean the same thing but in fact they have different meanings. Look at the words below. Two are proper words and one is not. Match up the proper words with their meanings.

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

misuse
to use something in the wrong way
disuse
to stop using something
unuse
not a proper word
EDDIE SAYS
High five! Although 'unuse' is not a proper word, 'unused' does exist. For example: They took away all the unused food and put it in the compost bin.
---- OR ----

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