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Reading Comprehension

In this assessment, students will review their comprehension of five different texts. This should take approximately 45 minutes to complete.

'Reading Comprehension' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:  End of Key Stage Assessments

Curriculum subtopic:  Starter Assessments

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

In this assessment, you'll review your ability to answer comprehension questions based on five different texts. May take approximately 45 minutes to complete but take all the time you need. 

You must answer assessment questions based on the following 5 extracts. To read the extract again click on the Help button in the questions.

 

Extract 1

Poem is by A.A. Milne, the creator of Winnie the Pooh.

Wind on the hill

 

No one can tell me,
Nobody knows,
Where the wind comes from,
Where the wind goes.
 
It's flying from somewhere
As fast as it can,
I couldn't keep up with it,
Not if I ran.
 
But if I stopped holding
The string of my kite,
It would blow with the wind
For a day and a night.
 
And then when I found it,
Wherever it blew,
I should know that the wind
Had been going there too.
 
So then I could tell them
Where the wind goes...
But where the wind comes from
Nobody knows.

**********************

 

Extract 2

Poem is by Emily Dickinson, a 19th Century American poet.

 

The Wind begun to rock the Grass

 

The Wind begun to rock the Grass
With threatening Tunes and low,
He flung a Menace at the Earth,
A Menace at the Sky.
 
The Leaves unhooked themselves from Trees
And started all abroad;
The Dust did scoop itself like Hands
And throw away the Road.
 
The Wagons quickened on the Streets,
The Thunder hurried slow;
The Lightning showed a Yellow Beak,
And then a livid Claw.
 
The Birds put up the Bars to Nests,
The Cattle fled to Barns;
There came one drop of Giant Rain,
And then, as if the Hands
 
That held the Dams had parted hold,
The Waters Wrecked the Sky,
But overlooked my Father’s House,
Just quartering a Tree.

 

**********************

 

Extract 3

Extract from Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens. Oliver Twist has just been born in a Victorian workhouse. (A workhouse is like a prison where poor people could work for no money but for food and a place to sleep).

 

 

What an excellent example of the power of dress, young Oliver Twist was! Wrapped in the blanket which had hitherto formed his only covering, he might have been the child of a nobleman or a beggar; it would have been hard for the haughtiest stranger to have assigned him his proper station in society. But now that he was enveloped in the old calico robes which had grown yellow in the same service, he was badged and ticketed, and fell into his place at once- a parish child- the orphan of a workhouse- the humble, half-starved drudge- to be cuffed and buffeted through the world- despised by all, and pitied by none.

 

********************

 

Extract 4

Extract from A Christmas Carol, also by Charles Dickens. The Cratchit family, who are poor but respectable, are being described.

 

 

There was nothing of high mark in this. They were not a handsome family; they were not well dressed; their shoes were far from being water-proof; their clothes were scanty; and Peter might have known, and very likely did, the inside of a pawnbroker's. But, they were happy, grateful, pleased with one another, and contented with the time; and when they faded, and looked happier yet in the bright sprinklings of the Spirit's torch at parting, Scrooge had his eye upon them, and especially on Tiny Tim, until the last.

********************

 

Extract 5

Read this article, written by a student for their secondary school newspaper.

 

 

More swimming lessons in school-time!

 

For ages, my friends and I have asked why P.E. seems squeezed out of the curriculum; as if it is a second-class subject to more 'academic' ones like Maths and Science. Even when we do P.E. and lessons are not cancelled in exam periods or for other 'more important' things, we only get to go swimming in year 7 for half a term. That's six lessons. Six lessons in five years. How stupid is that?

I asked Mrs Brute, head of P.E. in our school, why this was the case. She said that “Swimming lessons are expensive and older students often don't want to go. Rather than waste money, we bought three trampolines for the sports hall instead.” A good answer, you might think. But ask yourselves this: is a trampoline likely to save your life?

 

A recent survey for the Amateur Swimming Association discovered that 51% of seven- to 11-year-olds could not even swim the length of a standard pool. I know this is talking about primary school students, but if we get barely any lessons in secondary school, how are we supposed to improve on this? There are three main reasons why we need more swimming lessons:

  • Exercise. To combat obesity. This is a major problem amongst teenagers today.
  • Lifesaving skills. We live on an island, we go to the beach or use swimming pools on holiday.
  • Cost. Yes, it may be expensive for the school, but it is MORE expensive for us out of school. Schools have budgets for stuff like this. We don't need any more trampolines!

 

So fight with us to stay healthy - sign our petition today!

 

 

The first four questions relate to the A.A. Milne poem - Wind of the Hill.

 

Remember that you can look back at the poem as often as you like by clicking on the Help button.

 

Although A.A. Milne wrote this poem when he was an adult, do you think it is written from the point of view of an adult or a child?

adult

child

Which of the following statements best sums up the speaker's feelings towards the wind?

The speaker loves the wind.

The speaker hates the wind.

The speaker is frightened of the wind.

The speaker is interested in the wind.

Which of the following poetic devices does A.A. Milne use in his poem? Tick two boxes.

rhyme

onomatopoeia

lyrical feel

simile

A.A. Milne makes the wind seem like a living thing in this poem. Which of the following lines suggests that the wind is alive?

It's flying from somewhere

Where the wind comes from

It would blow with the wind

Where the wind goes...

The next four questions relate to Emily Dickinson's poem - The Wind Begun to Rock the Grass.

 

Remember that you can look back at the poem as often as you like by clicking on the Help button.

 

How would you sum up what the poem is about?

The poet is describing the coming of a huge storm.

The poet is describing her fear of the wind.

The poet is describing how much she loves the wind.

Emily Dickinson was well-known for her unusual use of capital letters. We don't know for certain why she did this, but what effect does it have on her poems?

It shows where she is changing the subject.

It makes certain words stand out.

It breaks the verses up into separate parts.

Which of the following poetic devices is used most in this poem?

rhyme

alliteration

personification

onomatopoeia

simile

Read the first two lines of the poem again.

 

The Wind begun to rock the Grass

With threatening Tunes and low

 

This opening sets the atmosphere of the poem. The wind is compared to a person rocking a cradle, but instead of singing gentle lullabies it is is singing 'threatening' tunes.

 

What do you think the word 'menace' refers to in the next two lines?

He threw a Menace at the Earth

A Menace at the Sky

the wind

the rain

the storm

This question is about both poems; Wind on the Hill and The Wind Begun to Rock the Grass

Look at the following adjectives and decide which ones could be used to describe the wind in each of the two poems.

 MilneDickinson
playful
fierce
angry
dangerous
mischievous
destructive
violent
mysterious

This question refers again to both poems;

Poems are written for many different reasons and you may have enjoyed one of these poems more than the other.

 

We cannot be sure what was in the poets minds when they wrote these poems, but what do you think are the likely reasons?

 MilneDickinson
to entertain a child
to describe a real event
to express relief after a frightening event
to show how a child may view the natural world

In the Oliver Twist extract, Dickens says that Oliver will be "pitied by none".

How can this be true when we feel sorry for him because of how he is described here as a newborn baby?

Dickens means that he doesn't feel sorry for Oliver, himself.

Dickens means that no-one should feel sorry for him.

Dickens means that most rich people at that time wouldn't have felt sorry for him.

Read this extract from the Oliver Twist text:

 

"Wrapped in the blanket which had hitherto formed his only covering, he might have been the child of a nobleman or a beggar"

 

Choose TWO comments below which you think Charles Dickens might be making here.

We are all born equal.

What we wear tells other people which social class we belong to.

Babies are wrapped in blankets.

Oliver Twist was a baby boy.

Rich children and poor children will have very different lives ahead of them.

In Oliver Twist, Dickens writes that before Oliver was covered up with rags; "It would have been hard for the haughtiest stranger to have assigned him his proper station in society."

 

What clues does this give us for the rest of the story? Choose TWO options.

That Oliver is just a baby.

That Oliver might make something of his life.

That without clothing it si impossible to tell if a baby is rich or poor

That Oliver is haughty.

Read this student's work and fill in the missing word. Write just the word in the box below.

 

Oliver Twist was born in a ______________. He started life in extreme poverty (the place he was born).

In the extract from A Christmas Carol, it says:

 

"Peter might have known, and very likely did, the inside of a pawnbroker's."

 

What does this mean? Choose the best answer below.

Peter helped the family out.

They were poor.

They sometimes had to swap their belongings for money to buy food.

Which of the following adjectives are from the extract of A Christmas Carol, and which are not? Remember, you can view the text again by clicking on the Help button above.

 Adjectives in the text NOT in the text
Happy
Chuffed
Grateful
Over-the-moon
Pleased
Contented

In A Christmas Carol Dickens writes:

 

"Scrooge had his eye upon them, and especially on Tiny Tim, until the last."

 

What does this tell us about Scrooge?

That Scrooge is beginning to learn something.

Scrooge wanted to keep an eye to see if they steal something.

Scrooge wanted to treat them all to new clothes.

Read this student's work and fill in the missing word. Write just the word in the box below.

 

Charles Dickens shows us how poor people lived in both texts. In A Christmas Carol he describes how the family have shabby __________ but they are still happy and love each other.

Which of these sentences fit both of the Dickens extracts you have read?

A baby boy has just been born.

You might be dressed in a poor way, but it's what is inside that counts.

Nearly everyone in Victorian times wore rags.

This question refers to both Dickens extracts;

Match up the Victorian words used in the extracts with their modern versions below.

Column A

Column B

Orphan
Hated
Drudge
Leaving
Despised
Worker
Scanty
No parents
Parting
Threadbare
Contented
Happy

In the swimming article, the writer uses personal pronouns throughout the article. Through most of it they use 'I' and 'you', but in the last line, this changes:

So fight with us to stay healthy - sign our petition today!

 

Why do they use 'us' and 'our' when they talk about the petition?

It makes it more informal.

It suggests there is a group of you so it is more likely to change things.

Because they wanted to use rule of three.

In the swimming extract the writer uses some informal words and phrases.

Match up the informal language they have chosen with the formal equivalent.

Column A

Column B

talking about
peers
friends
sidelined
stupid
unintelligent
stuff like this
referring to
squeezed out
activities

Why does the writer choose to use some informal words or phrases in the article?

to fit the layout

to fit the purpose

to fit the audience

In the Swimming article, which literary technique is included in each of the three paragraphs?

Look at where the question marks have been used. Write the two missing words in the answer box below. 

 

They all have a r__________ q___________ in them.

Look at the Swimming article; The writer uses repetition to emphasise his or her point;

 

Which quotation uses repetition? 

 
That's six lessons. Six lessons in five years.

I asked Mrs Brute, head of P.E. in our school...

Exercise. To combat obesity.

In the Swimming article the writer quotes a statistic:

A recent survey for the Amateur Swimming Association discovered that 51% of seven- to 11-year-olds could not even swim the length of a standard pool.

 

Why have they chosen to include this? Choose THREE options.

Because it rhymes

Because it was on the news

To support their argument

To help persuade teachers

So that adults will listen to them

Look at the swimming article, note how the writing is set out using both paragraphs and bullet points.

When we consider this part of the writing, we are looking at the l_________ of the text.

 

Write the entire missing word in the answer box below.

In the swimming article, the writer includes a quotation from Mrs Brute, head of P.E. Why have they chosen to do this? Choose THREE options.

So they can counter her points and make her look silly.

Because she is also good at swimming.

So the article looks more balanced.

Because it is a rhetorical question.

To allow her to defend the decision.

In the swimming article, the writer uses personal pronouns throughout the article. Through most of it they use 'I' and 'you', but in the last line, this changes:

So fight with us to stay healthy - sign our petition today!

 

Why do they use 'us' and 'our' when they talk about the petition?

It makes it more informal.

It suggests there is a group of you so it is more likely to change things.

Because they wanted to use rule of three.

Imagine that you had to write a reply to the swimming article from the governors of the school.

Which THREE main points from those listed below would you use to argue that things should stay as they are, and no extra swimming lessons should be added?

They are expensive.

Students might get verrucas.

Students might get their hair wet.

Students might truant or be 'ill' to avoid it.

Other sports will not get covered in P.E.

  • Question 1

The first four questions relate to the A.A. Milne poem - Wind of the Hill.

 

Remember that you can look back at the poem as often as you like by clicking on the Help button.

 

Although A.A. Milne wrote this poem when he was an adult, do you think it is written from the point of view of an adult or a child?

CORRECT ANSWER
child
EDDIE SAYS
The poem is filled with childlike wonder and curiosity, the poet uses lots of questions starting with 'why' or 'how come' to emphasise a child's way of thinking.
  • Question 2

Which of the following statements best sums up the speaker's feelings towards the wind?

CORRECT ANSWER
The speaker is interested in the wind.
EDDIE SAYS
There is no evidence in the poem that the speaker is afraid of the wind. He or she is interested in where the wind comes from and where it goes, just like a child might be.
  • Question 3

Which of the following poetic devices does A.A. Milne use in his poem? Tick two boxes.

CORRECT ANSWER
rhyme
lyrical feel
EDDIE SAYS
This is a short poem of songlike quality. The rhyme scheme is ABCB/DEFE/GHIH/JKLK/MNON. The last word of every second and fourth line in a stanza rhymes.
  • Question 4

A.A. Milne makes the wind seem like a living thing in this poem. Which of the following lines suggests that the wind is alive?

CORRECT ANSWER
It's flying from somewhere
EDDIE SAYS
The wind does not really fly, and the choice of the word 'flying' creates the impression that the wind is a living creature.
  • Question 5

The next four questions relate to Emily Dickinson's poem - The Wind Begun to Rock the Grass.

 

Remember that you can look back at the poem as often as you like by clicking on the Help button.

 

How would you sum up what the poem is about?

CORRECT ANSWER
The poet is describing the coming of a huge storm.
EDDIE SAYS
The poem describes the coming of a violent storm. The narrator may well have been afraid of the storm but the emphasis is on the description of its approach and its effects on her surroundings.
  • Question 6

Emily Dickinson was well-known for her unusual use of capital letters. We don't know for certain why she did this, but what effect does it have on her poems?

CORRECT ANSWER
It makes certain words stand out.
EDDIE SAYS
Most of the words she has capitalised are nouns, and the effect is to make them stand out on the page and draw our attention to them.
  • Question 7

Which of the following poetic devices is used most in this poem?

CORRECT ANSWER
personification
EDDIE SAYS
Personification means giving human qualities to non-living things. In this poem the wind is referred to as 'he' and is rocking the grass and throwing things at the earth. The leaves are unhooking themselves from the trees and the dust is throwing away the road.
  • Question 8

Read the first two lines of the poem again.

 

The Wind begun to rock the Grass

With threatening Tunes and low

 

This opening sets the atmosphere of the poem. The wind is compared to a person rocking a cradle, but instead of singing gentle lullabies it is is singing 'threatening' tunes.

 

What do you think the word 'menace' refers to in the next two lines?

He threw a Menace at the Earth

A Menace at the Sky

CORRECT ANSWER
the storm
EDDIE SAYS
The word refers to the whole storm, which the wind is accused of starting. The word 'menace' means something that is threatening or is likely to cause harm.
  • Question 9

This question is about both poems; Wind on the Hill and The Wind Begun to Rock the Grass

Look at the following adjectives and decide which ones could be used to describe the wind in each of the two poems.

CORRECT ANSWER
 MilneDickinson
playful
fierce
angry
dangerous
mischievous
destructive
violent
mysterious
EDDIE SAYS
The wind could be described as 'mysterious', 'mischievous' and 'playful' in the Milne poem because the childlike qualities of the speaker have little experience of the wind and are wondering where it comes from. In Emily Dickinson's poem she is writing about a tornado that she witnessed, so she knows that the wind can be 'violent', 'angry', 'fierce' and 'destructive'.
  • Question 10

This question refers again to both poems;

Poems are written for many different reasons and you may have enjoyed one of these poems more than the other.

 

We cannot be sure what was in the poets minds when they wrote these poems, but what do you think are the likely reasons?

CORRECT ANSWER
 MilneDickinson
to entertain a child
to describe a real event
to express relief after a frightening event
to show how a child may view the natural world
EDDIE SAYS
These are suggestions, based on the language, mood and feelings created by the poems. The storm described by Emily Dickinson may have really taken place and she may have written the poem because she was relieved that her father's house wasn't damaged.
  • Question 11

In the Oliver Twist extract, Dickens says that Oliver will be "pitied by none".

How can this be true when we feel sorry for him because of how he is described here as a newborn baby?

CORRECT ANSWER
Dickens means that most rich people at that time wouldn't have felt sorry for him.
EDDIE SAYS
In Victorian times, most rich people would not have any sympathy for the poor. Dickens did a lot to change this attitude especially with the 'deserving poor' although he also believed that there were many 'undeserving poor' too.
  • Question 12

Read this extract from the Oliver Twist text:

 

"Wrapped in the blanket which had hitherto formed his only covering, he might have been the child of a nobleman or a beggar"

 

Choose TWO comments below which you think Charles Dickens might be making here.

CORRECT ANSWER
What we wear tells other people which social class we belong to.
Oliver Twist was a baby boy.
EDDIE SAYS
Although all five comments are correct, babies being wrapped in blankets and Oliver Twist being a boy are obvious facts, whilst the three statements above tell us about what Dickens really feels about this situation.
  • Question 13

In Oliver Twist, Dickens writes that before Oliver was covered up with rags; "It would have been hard for the haughtiest stranger to have assigned him his proper station in society."

 

What clues does this give us for the rest of the story? Choose TWO options.

CORRECT ANSWER
That Oliver is just a baby.
That without clothing it si impossible to tell if a baby is rich or poor
EDDIE SAYS
In Victorian times it was easy to tell if someone was rich or poor by the clothes they wore and the way they spoke. Dickens is outlining here that a new baby without clothes could have been rich or poor, but from this point on their paths would be very different.
  • Question 14

Read this student's work and fill in the missing word. Write just the word in the box below.

 

Oliver Twist was born in a ______________. He started life in extreme poverty (the place he was born).

CORRECT ANSWER
workhouse
work house
EDDIE SAYS
Workhouses were where poor people who had no job or home lived. Also orphaned children, abandoned children, the sick, the disabled, and the elderly. Anyone who did not have enough money to pay rent and/or couldn't work. They would earn their keep by doing jobs in the workhouse.
  • Question 15

In the extract from A Christmas Carol, it says:

 

"Peter might have known, and very likely did, the inside of a pawnbroker's."

 

What does this mean? Choose the best answer below.

CORRECT ANSWER
They sometimes had to swap their belongings for money to buy food.
EDDIE SAYS
All three are true, but this sentence is the best for explaining the quotation above. A pawnbrokers is a place where you can borrow money in exchange for personal property that can be sold if the money is not repaid.
  • Question 16

Which of the following adjectives are from the extract of A Christmas Carol, and which are not? Remember, you can view the text again by clicking on the Help button above.

CORRECT ANSWER
 Adjectives in the text NOT in the text
Happy
Chuffed
Grateful
Over-the-moon
Pleased
Contented
EDDIE SAYS
An adjective is a word that changes a noun to make it more specific, i.e. a 'happy' child, a 'grateful' parent.
  • Question 17

In A Christmas Carol Dickens writes:

 

"Scrooge had his eye upon them, and especially on Tiny Tim, until the last."

 

What does this tell us about Scrooge?

CORRECT ANSWER
Scrooge wanted to keep an eye to see if they steal something.
EDDIE SAYS
Scrooge is keeping his eye on the family because he is learning a lot about people who are poorer than him, such as the Cratchits, and how they can be so content even though they don't have a lot of money.
  • Question 18

Read this student's work and fill in the missing word. Write just the word in the box below.

 

Charles Dickens shows us how poor people lived in both texts. In A Christmas Carol he describes how the family have shabby __________ but they are still happy and love each other.

CORRECT ANSWER
clothes
EDDIE SAYS
Shabby means when something is in poor condition through long use or lack of care.
  • Question 19

Which of these sentences fit both of the Dickens extracts you have read?

CORRECT ANSWER
You might be dressed in a poor way, but it's what is inside that counts.
EDDIE SAYS
Charles Dickens did a lot to highlight the plight of the poor. However in those days there was a clear distinction between the 'deserving poor' and the 'undeserving poor'. This was highlighted in the Poor Law of 1834.
  • Question 20

This question refers to both Dickens extracts;

Match up the Victorian words used in the extracts with their modern versions below.

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

Orphan
No parents
Drudge
Worker
Despised
Hated
Scanty
Threadbare
Parting
Leaving
Contented
Happy
EDDIE SAYS
Language changes and evolves all the time. Words that were common in Victorian times may not be used as much today.
  • Question 21

In the swimming article, the writer uses personal pronouns throughout the article. Through most of it they use 'I' and 'you', but in the last line, this changes:

So fight with us to stay healthy - sign our petition today!

 

Why do they use 'us' and 'our' when they talk about the petition?

CORRECT ANSWER
It suggests there is a group of you so it is more likely to change things.
EDDIE SAYS
Including the reader as part of you 'group' makes them feel included and more likely to agree to your argument.
  • Question 22

In the swimming extract the writer uses some informal words and phrases.

Match up the informal language they have chosen with the formal equivalent.

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

talking about
referring to
friends
peers
stupid
unintelligent
stuff like this
activities
squeezed out
sidelined
EDDIE SAYS
Formal and informal language serve different purposes. Formal language is less relaxed and less personal, it is usually used when writing for professional or academic purposes.
  • Question 23

Why does the writer choose to use some informal words or phrases in the article?

CORRECT ANSWER
to fit the audience
EDDIE SAYS
The audience is young people in secondary school, so the writer uses informal language to appeal to them.
  • Question 24

In the Swimming article, which literary technique is included in each of the three paragraphs?

Look at where the question marks have been used. Write the two missing words in the answer box below. 

 

They all have a r__________ q___________ in them.

CORRECT ANSWER
rhetorical question
EDDIE SAYS
A rhetorical question is a question you might ask without actually expecting an answer. It is asked to create a dramatic effect or make a point.
  • Question 25

Look at the Swimming article; The writer uses repetition to emphasise his or her point;

 

Which quotation uses repetition? 

 
CORRECT ANSWER
That's six lessons. Six lessons in five years.
EDDIE SAYS
Repetition can be used for emphasis or reinforcement of a key idea.
  • Question 26

In the Swimming article the writer quotes a statistic:

A recent survey for the Amateur Swimming Association discovered that 51% of seven- to 11-year-olds could not even swim the length of a standard pool.

 

Why have they chosen to include this? Choose THREE options.

CORRECT ANSWER
To support their argument
To help persuade teachers
So that adults will listen to them
EDDIE SAYS
Statistics are number facts that can be used to provide convincing information to help persuade the reader to see your point of view.
  • Question 27

Look at the swimming article, note how the writing is set out using both paragraphs and bullet points.

When we consider this part of the writing, we are looking at the l_________ of the text.

 

Write the entire missing word in the answer box below.

CORRECT ANSWER
layout
EDDIE SAYS
Layout is the physical organisation of the text on the page.
  • Question 28

In the swimming article, the writer includes a quotation from Mrs Brute, head of P.E. Why have they chosen to do this? Choose THREE options.

CORRECT ANSWER
So they can counter her points and make her look silly.
So the article looks more balanced.
To allow her to defend the decision.
EDDIE SAYS
When you counter argue, it is good practice to give an opposite viewpoint, so that you can oppose it and therefore show your views in a strong light by putting down the opposite point of view.
  • Question 29

In the swimming article, the writer uses personal pronouns throughout the article. Through most of it they use 'I' and 'you', but in the last line, this changes:

So fight with us to stay healthy - sign our petition today!

 

Why do they use 'us' and 'our' when they talk about the petition?

CORRECT ANSWER
It suggests there is a group of you so it is more likely to change things.
EDDIE SAYS
Including the reader as part of you 'group' makes them feel included and more likely to agree to your argument.
  • Question 30

Imagine that you had to write a reply to the swimming article from the governors of the school.

Which THREE main points from those listed below would you use to argue that things should stay as they are, and no extra swimming lessons should be added?

CORRECT ANSWER
They are expensive.
Students might truant or be 'ill' to avoid it.
Other sports will not get covered in P.E.
EDDIE SAYS
When writing persuasive letters it is useful to list all of the most powerful reasons why or why not, in order to try and persuade your reader. However, they need to be sensible otherwise you may show that you have not properly thought through your argument.
---- OR ----

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