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Write a Discussion Text

In this worksheet, students practise writing a discussion text, focusing on the language conventions and grammatical structure of a discussion text.

'Write a Discussion Text' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:  Writing: Composition

Curriculum subtopic:  Plan What and Who to Write For

Difficulty level:  

down

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

A discussion text is a text that presents both sides of an issue or argument.

 

The title of the text often outlines the issue to be discussed in the form of a question.

for example:

Should cars be banned from town centres?

 

Discussion texts often contain the following features.

 

1) The first sentence or paragraph describes the issue to be discussed.

e.g. Many people believe that mobile phones should be banned in schools.

 

2) Arguments for both sides are then presented in the following paragraphs.

 

3) Points are backed up with evidence.

e.g. Government studies have shown that...

 

4) The final paragraph concludes the discussion by giving the writer's opinion or asking the reader to decide what he/she thinks.

 

5) They are written in the present tense.

 

6) Connectives that give emphasis (e.g. furthermore, in addition) and connectives that compare and contrast (e.g. however, on the other hand) are often used.

 

In this worksheet you can practise writing a discussion text, focusing on including all the above features. Remember that you can look back at this introduction as often as you like by clicking on the Help button.

In the box below write a discussion text about an issue you are interested in, such as whether mobile phones should be banned in schools or whether animals should perform in circuses. You may need to do some research in an information book or on the internet if you do not have enough facts about your chosen subject.

 

Remember that in a discussion text you are aiming to write a balanced argument, not persuade the reader of your point of view. You may present your opinion one way or the other at the end of the text but it is important that you give both sides of the argument. Write your text in paragraphs and try to include the features that are listed in the introduction. (Remember that you can look back at the introduction as often as you like by clicking on the Help button.)

 

  

  • Question 1

In the box below write a discussion text about an issue you are interested in, such as whether mobile phones should be banned in schools or whether animals should perform in circuses. You may need to do some research in an information book or on the internet if you do not have enough facts about your chosen subject.

 

Remember that in a discussion text you are aiming to write a balanced argument, not persuade the reader of your point of view. You may present your opinion one way or the other at the end of the text but it is important that you give both sides of the argument. Write your text in paragraphs and try to include the features that are listed in the introduction. (Remember that you can look back at the introduction as often as you like by clicking on the Help button.)

 

  

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Award a maximum of 10 marks for the discussion text.
1) Award one mark for a suitable title, which should be written as a question.
2) Award one mark if the opening sentence or paragraph clearly states the issue that is to be discussed.
3 and 4) Award up to two marks if clear arguments are presented on both sides of the debate. Award only one mark if there is a bias towards one point of view.
5 and 6) Award up to two marks if the points made are backed up with evidence. Award only one mark if there is limited evidence.
7) Award one mark if the text is divided into paragraphs in appropriate places.
8) Award one mark if the text is written in the present tense.
9) Award one mark if suitable connectives are used to emphasise, compare or contrast.
10) Award one mark for an effective conclusion that summarises the arguments and may present the student's viewpoint.
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