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Old Words, New Words: How Language Changes 1

In this worksheet, students identify new words that have come into use in recent years and old words that have fallen out of use.

'Old Words, New Words: How Language Changes 1' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:  Reading: Word Reading

Curriculum subtopic:  Root Word Awareness

Difficulty level:  

down

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

A language never stands still. New words are added all the time, while other words stop being used.


Shakespeare's plays can be hard to understand because he used words that we no longer use in English, but imagine how he would feel if he visited Britain today and heard words like 'internet' and 'shopaholic'!

These sporting terms have all come into the language in the past few decades. Match them with their definitions.

Column A

Column B

snowboard
to slide down a snow-covered hillside on a board
wheelie
a shoe worn for sporting activities
trainer
a type of acrobatic dancing where different parts ...
break dancing
a stunt performed by riding a bicycle or motorbike...

Our language now contains a great many words linked to computers. Match these terms with their definitions.

Column A

Column B

email
unwanted emails that are often sent to a huge numb...
laptop
a discussion group that takes place over the inter...
chat room
a computer small enough to be carried around and u...
spam
a system for sending messages electronically

Link these driving terms with their definitions.

Column A

Column B

motorway
anger felt by one driver towards another driver
biofuel
a type of bicycle with a motor
road rage
fuel produced from plant and animal materials rath...
moped
a road with several lanes designed to let cars tra...

Match these food-related words with their definitions.

Column A

Column B

junk food
a pub that serves good food as well as drinks
take away
food that can be prepared very quickly
fast food
food that has little nutritional value
gastropub
food that is sold to be eaten elsewhere

Match these film and TV-related terms with their definitions.

Column A

Column B

blockbuster
a very successful film
prime time
television showing real events and using ordinary ...
reality TV
the time when an audience for a TV show is likely ...
couch potato
a person who spends a lot of time watching televis...

In the next five questions you will need to identify the meaning of some words that were once common in English but are now rarely used. You may need to use a dictionary to help you.

 

Who or what was a 'byre'?

a type of tree

a cowshed

a bicycle

a person who bought and sold books

These days a 'cot' is a bed for a baby, but what did it mean a few hundred years ago?

a type of dress

an illness

a small shelter

an animal's food trough

In the past, what did it mean if you 'coveted' something?

you hated it

you wanted it

you covered it up

you lay on it

What does the old-fashioned verb 'to forsake' mean?

to give up

to help

to threaten

to worry about

If someone in Victorian times talked about 'vittles', what were they referring to?

rats and mice

food

important things

carriages

  • Question 1

These sporting terms have all come into the language in the past few decades. Match them with their definitions.

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

snowboard
to slide down a snow-covered hill...
wheelie
a stunt performed by riding a bic...
trainer
a shoe worn for sporting activiti...
break dancing
a type of acrobatic dancing where...
  • Question 2

Our language now contains a great many words linked to computers. Match these terms with their definitions.

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

email
a system for sending messages ele...
laptop
a computer small enough to be car...
chat room
a discussion group that takes pla...
spam
unwanted emails that are often se...
EDDIE SAYS
The word 'spam' was already in the English language, but it referred to a type of tinned meat.
  • Question 3

Link these driving terms with their definitions.

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

motorway
a road with several lanes designe...
biofuel
fuel produced from plant and anim...
road rage
anger felt by one driver towards ...
moped
a type of bicycle with a motor
EDDIE SAYS
All these words came into the English language during the 20th Century. 'Road rage' is the newest, being used first in the 1980s.
  • Question 4

Match these food-related words with their definitions.

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

junk food
food that has little nutritional ...
take away
food that is sold to be eaten els...
fast food
food that can be prepared very qu...
gastropub
a pub that serves good food as we...
  • Question 5

Match these film and TV-related terms with their definitions.

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

blockbuster
a very successful film
prime time
the time when an audience for a T...
reality TV
television showing real events an...
couch potato
a person who spends a lot of time...
  • Question 6

In the next five questions you will need to identify the meaning of some words that were once common in English but are now rarely used. You may need to use a dictionary to help you.

 

Who or what was a 'byre'?

CORRECT ANSWER
a cowshed
  • Question 7

These days a 'cot' is a bed for a baby, but what did it mean a few hundred years ago?

CORRECT ANSWER
a small shelter
EDDIE SAYS
Our modern word 'cottage', meaning a small house, comes from the word 'cot'.
  • Question 8

In the past, what did it mean if you 'coveted' something?

CORRECT ANSWER
you wanted it
  • Question 9

What does the old-fashioned verb 'to forsake' mean?

CORRECT ANSWER
to give up
  • Question 10

If someone in Victorian times talked about 'vittles', what were they referring to?

CORRECT ANSWER
food
---- OR ----

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