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Writing to Advise: Information for Younger Students

In this worksheet, students read instructions and helpful hints before writing a text to advise younger students. Adults can mark this work using the mark scheme provided.

'Writing to Advise: Information for Younger Students' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 3

Curriculum topic:  Writing

Curriculum subtopic:  Consider Purpose of Own Writing

Difficulty level:  

down

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

When we write to advise we need to use friendly language which suggests ideas rather than tells people what to do. For example, saying 'You might...' or 'You can...' sounds better than saying 'You must...' or 'You should...'. 

 

You can also use rhetorical questions such as 'Why not try.....?' Or make statements which remind the reader that they are not alone, such as: 'Some people find it helpful to...' 

 

As with all writing tasks, remember to use full sentences, divide your work into paragraphs and add as much detail as you can to expand your point and ideas.

 

Try to spend 45 minutes on this task.

 

Write an advice leaflet aimed at the new Year 7 students at your school. It needs to give them advice on what to do if they feel unwell during the school day.

 

Some ideas of what to include: who to tell, where to go, what to do, what to do when you return to school after being away due to illness.

 

Remember to use friendly language to reassure your reader, but don't slip into using slang!

  • Question 1

 

Write an advice leaflet aimed at the new Year 7 students at your school. It needs to give them advice on what to do if they feel unwell during the school day.

 

Some ideas of what to include: who to tell, where to go, what to do, what to do when you return to school after being away due to illness.

 

Remember to use friendly language to reassure your reader, but don't slip into using slang!

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Writing mark scheme based on National Curriculum levels.

9 or 10 marks: Writing is controlled and confident. They use a range of vocabulary and spelling is generally correct. Paragraphs clearly support the meaning.

7 or 8 marks: Starting to vary sentence structure. Using “although, on the other hand, meanwhile” (connectives). Using paragraphs to clearly organise their work.

5 or 6 marks: Using “if, when, because” (connectives). Beginning to use paragraphs. Punctuation, including speech marks, used correctly.

3 or 4 marks: Use some complex sentences with “and, but, so,” (connectives) in them. Basic spelling and punctuation correct. Straightforward sentences used.

1 or 2 marks: Using capital letters and full stops. Vary the way they begin a sentence. Simple vocabulary.
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