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Preparing for GCSE Non-Fiction Reading (Level 2): Social Media

In this worksheet, students can practise their reading and writing skills for the GCSE. They must spend two hours on this.

'Preparing for GCSE Non-Fiction Reading (Level 2): Social Media' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 3

Curriculum topic:   GCSE Practice Papers

Curriculum subtopic:   Non-Fiction

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

This paper will test your reading and writing. It is a good idea to print out the source materials from the PDF files to have in front of you to read and annotate.

 

Source 1: Teenagers Turn Off TV in Favour of Facebook

Source 2: #Social Media #Modern Parental Problem!

Source 3: Camp Westbury

 

Answer all questions and give yourself a time limit of two hours - one for Section A and one for Section B. Set an alarm! You must refer to the reading sources provided. You must not use a dictionary.

  • The marks for questions are shown in brackets.
  • The maximum mark for this paper is 80.
  • You are reminded of the need for good English and clear presentation in your answers. 
  • Before you start writing, read through all of the questions you have to answer and the reading sources.
  • You are advised to spend two hours on this paper.

 

Good luck!

Section A: Reading

Answer all questions in this section.

You are advised to spend about one hour on this section.

 

 

 

Look at Source 1, the online article, "Teenagers Turn Off TV in Favour of Facebook".

 

1. a. List four things we learn about teenagers’ use of social media sites. [4 marks]

b. What are TV companies’ feelings about teenagers and social media sites? [4 marks]

Now read Source 2, the newspaper article, "#Social Media #Modern Parental Problem!".

 

2. What are the issues surrounding social media and children?

 

Remember to:

  • show your understanding by explaining in your own words,
  • support your ideas using the text. [8 marks]

Now read Source 3, the leaflet advertising Camp Westbury.

 

3. How does the writer use language features in the extract?

 

Remember to:

  • give some examples of language features,
  • explain the effects. [12 marks]

Look again at Source 2 and Source 3.

 

4. Compare the way the two texts use presentational features for effect.

 

Remember to:

  • write about the way the sources are presented,
  • explain the effect of the presentational features,
  • compare the way they look. [12 marks]

Section B: Writing

Answer both questions in this section.

You are advised to spend about one hour on this section.

You are advised to spend about 25 minutes on question 5.

You are advised to spend about 35 minutes on question 6.

 

 

 

5. Your local newspaper is running a weekly column called The Internet and Your Child.

 

Write a short article for the column explaining the positive and negative aspects of the internet.

 

Remember to:

  • write an article,
  • use language to explain. [16 marks]

6. "Head teachers are right in banning bringing smart phones to school as they serve no educational purpose and are simply a distraction."

 

Write a speech for a classroom debate arguing for or against this opinion.

 

Remember to:

  • write a speech,
  • use language to argue. [24 marks]

 

Try to write approximately two pages.

  • Question 1

Section A: Reading

Answer all questions in this section.

You are advised to spend about one hour on this section.

 

 

 

Look at Source 1, the online article, "Teenagers Turn Off TV in Favour of Facebook".

 

1. a. List four things we learn about teenagers’ use of social media sites. [4 marks]

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Give up to 4 marks for any of the following:
• Teenagers prefer social media to watching television.
• They are more likely to be on a smart phone or tablet than watching TV.
• Chatting to friends on social media sites is the top leisure activity.
• Teenagers can be online for 3 hours at a time.
• Teenagers spend up to 17 hours a week online.
• 80% of teenagers have a social profile.
• One in four of their ‘friends’ on social media sites are strangers.
  • Question 2

b. What are TV companies’ feelings about teenagers and social media sites? [4 marks]

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Give up to 4 marks for any of the following:
• They are worried.
• They are trying to win teenagers back to watching television.
• They are creating online games that teenagers can play while watching a show.
• They are desperate to increase their viewing figures.
  • Question 3

Now read Source 2, the newspaper article, "#Social Media #Modern Parental Problem!".

 

2. What are the issues surrounding social media and children?

 

Remember to:

  • show your understanding by explaining in your own words,
  • support your ideas using the text. [8 marks]
CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Award a mark for any of the following points and a mark for each time a quotation is used as evidence. Up to 8 marks.
• Social media is a problem for modern parents.
• Social media is the future but it isn't always safe for children.
• Opinion about whether children should use social media is divided amongst parents.
• Social media can help children learn about the world.
• Social media is everywhere and if you ban it they will use it in secret.
• Social media is about forming an identity.
• Social media is the rock and roll of our modern times.
• She understands that too much social media can encourage online gaming and that children can lose touch with reality.
• She believes that parents must monitor their children's social media usage.
  • Question 4

Now read Source 3, the leaflet advertising Camp Westbury.

 

3. How does the writer use language features in the extract?

 

Remember to:

  • give some examples of language features,
  • explain the effects. [12 marks]
CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Award a mark for any of the following points and extra marks for quotations and effects. Up to 12 mark.
• use of pronouns ‘your’ and ‘we’
• repetition of ‘give’
• list of three – happier, healthier, etc.
• alliteration – ‘fresh air, fun… friendships’
• words such as ‘promise’ and ‘guarantee’
• ‘award winning’
• metaphor – ‘the world to explore’
  • Question 5

Look again at Source 2 and Source 3.

 

4. Compare the way the two texts use presentational features for effect.

 

Remember to:

  • write about the way the sources are presented,
  • explain the effect of the presentational features,
  • compare the way they look. [12 marks]
CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Give up to 12 marks for any of the following:
Source 2 – "#Social Media #Modern Parental Problem!"
• headline – use of hash-tags – style of Twitter
• Image of young child on computer – sums up point of article.

Source 3 – Camp Westbury
• Hands holding a world – links to ideas in text that by sending them to the camp you are offering them a world of opportunities.
• Heart-shaped hands – suggests that if you love your children and want the best for them you will send them to this camp. The text reinforces this idea.
• any other relevant points
• colours – red to stand out
  • Question 6

Section B: Writing

Answer both questions in this section.

You are advised to spend about one hour on this section.

You are advised to spend about 25 minutes on question 5.

You are advised to spend about 35 minutes on question 6.

 

 

 

5. Your local newspaper is running a weekly column called The Internet and Your Child.

 

Write a short article for the column explaining the positive and negative aspects of the internet.

 

Remember to:

  • write an article,
  • use language to explain. [16 marks]
CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
12–16 marks:
• The student communicates ideas effectively and engages the reader with detailed description.
• The student uses a range of linguistic features such as metaphors, similes and alliteration to make their writing interesting.
• The student uses ambitious vocabulary and spells complex words correctly.
• Paragraphs are used correctly and they use a range of different types of sentences with varied punctuation.

5–11 marks:
• The student communicates their ideas and uses some detailed description.
• The student uses some of linguistic features such as metaphors, similes and alliteration to make their writing interesting.
• The student attempts to use some ambitious vocabulary and spells some complex words accurately.
• There is an attempt at correct paragraphing and sentences are mainly punctuated correctly with an attempt at varied punctuation.

1–4 marks:
• There is limited communication of ideas and little description.
• The student uses very few linguistic features such as metaphors, similes and alliteration to make their writing interesting.
• There is limited vocabulary and few complex words are spelt accurately.
• There are no paragraphs and punctuation is often incorrect.
  • Question 7

6. "Head teachers are right in banning bringing smart phones to school as they serve no educational purpose and are simply a distraction."

 

Write a speech for a classroom debate arguing for or against this opinion.

 

Remember to:

  • write a speech,
  • use language to argue. [24 marks]

 

Try to write approximately two pages.

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
16–24 marks:
• The student communicates ideas effectively and engages the reader with detailed complex ideas.
• Style and content is matched to audience and purpose.
• The student uses a range of linguistic features such as rhetorical questions, irony, and exaggeration to engage the reader.
• The student uses ambitious vocabulary and spells complex words correctly.
• Paragraphs are used correctly and they use a range of different types of sentences with varied punctuation.
• Student uses complex grammar.
• Connectives are used fluently.

7–15 marks:
• The student successfully communicates and uses some detailed ideas.
• The student clearly identifies audience and purpose.
• The student uses some linguistic features such as rhetorical questions to engage the reader.
• The student attempts to use some ambitious vocabulary and spells some complex words accurately.
• There is an attempt at correct paragraphing and sentences are mainly punctuated correctly with an attempt at varied punctuation. Connectives are used but sometimes mechanically.

1–6 marks:
• There is limited communication of ideas and little detail – one or two ideas are linked.
• There is little awareness of audience and purpose.
• The student uses very few linguistic features such as rhetorical questions to engage the reader.
• There is limited vocabulary and few complex words are spelt accurately.
• There are no paragraphs and punctuation is often incorrect.
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