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End of Key Stage 3 English Assessment

In this assessment, students will review their comprehension of English literature and language across Key Stage 3. The assessment will take approximately 45 minutes to complete.

'End of Key Stage 3 English Assessment' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 3

Curriculum topic:  End of Key Stage Assessments

Curriculum subtopic:  Starter Assessments

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

In this assessment, you will review your comprehension of English literature and language across Key Stage 3. The assessment will take approximately 45 minutes to complete. This is a timed activity. Don't worry if it takes you longer to complete. 

 

If you need to read the text again, you can do so by clicking on the Help button.

Read the following poem by Thomas Hardy:

 

The Man He Killed

 

 

Had he and I but met
By some old ancient inn,
We should have set us down to wet
Right many a nipperkin!

But ranged as infantry,
And staring face to face,
I shot at him as he at me,
And killed him in his place.

I shot him dead because--
Because he was my foe,
Just so: my foe of course he was;
That's clear enough; although

He thought he'd 'list, perhaps,
Off-hand like--just as I--
Was out of work--had sold his traps--
No other reason why.

Yes; quaint and curious war is!
You shoot a fellow down
You'd treat, if met where any bar is,
Or help to half a crown.

 

Thomas Hardy  (1902)

**********************

Read the following long poem 'My Last Duchess' (1842) by Robert Browningand answer the questions that follow.

 

 

*******************

My Last Duchess

 

That’s my last Duchess painted on the wall,

Looking as if she were alive. I call

That piece a wonder, now; Fra Pandolf’s hands

Worked busily a day, and there she stands.

Will’t please you sit and look at her? I said

“Fra Pandolf” by design, for never read

Strangers like you that pictured countenance,

The depth and passion of its earnest glance,

But to myself they turned (since none puts by

The curtain I have drawn for you, but I)

And seemed as they would ask me, if they durst,

How such a glance came there; so, not the first

Are you to turn and ask thus. Sir, ’twas not

Her husband’s presence only, called that spot

Of joy into the Duchess’ cheek; perhaps

Fra Pandolf chanced to say, “Her mantle laps

Over my lady’s wrist too much,” or “Paint

Must never hope to reproduce the faint

Half-flush that dies along her throat.” Such stuff

Was courtesy, she thought, and cause enough

For calling up that spot of joy. She had

A heart—how shall I say?—too soon made glad,

Too easily impressed; she liked whate’er

She looked on, and her looks went everywhere.

Sir, ’twas all one! My favour at her breast,

The dropping of the daylight in the West,

The bough of cherries some officious fool

Broke in the orchard for her, the white mule

She rode with round the terrace—all and each

Would draw from her alike the approving speech,

Or blush, at least. She thanked men—good! but thanked

Somehow—I know not how—as if she ranked

My gift of a nine-hundred-years-old name

With anybody’s gift. Who’d stoop to blame

This sort of trifling? Even had you skill

In speech—which I have not—to make your will

Quite clear to such an one, and say, “Just this

Or that in you disgusts me; here you miss,

Or there exceed the mark”—and if she let

Herself be lessoned so, nor plainly set

Her wits to yours, forsooth, and made excuse—

E’en then would be some stooping; and I choose

Never to stoop. Oh, sir, she smiled, no doubt,

Whene’er I passed her; but who passed without

Much the same smile? This grew; I gave commands;

Then all smiles stopped together. There she stands

As if alive. Will’t please you rise? We’ll meet

The company below, then. I repeat,

The Count your master’s known munificence

Is ample warrant that no just pretense

Of mine for dowry will be disallowed;

Though his fair daughter’s self, as I avowed

At starting, is my object. Nay, we’ll go

Together down, sir. Notice Neptune, though,

Taming a sea-horse, thought a rarity,

Which Claus of Innsbruck cast in bronze for me!

*******************

Read the following two texts about zoos.

 

 

 

Text 1: We are more than animals!

How inhumane it is that, over a decade into the 21st century, we still keep wild animals in cages to gawp at for our own amusement? Yes, there may be laws about how much space each animal is allowed; there may even be moves to ‘stimulate’ the animals, providing toys and items to keep them amused. But do they ever get the chance to run as they were designed to do? To hunt? To eat a variety of foods, as they would do in the wild? Do they get chance to choose their own mate? To climb trees? To fly?

As humans, we are more than animals: we have the capacity to think things through, to reason, to show compassion and kindness. This is why we have a responsibility to close  zoos and only house wild animals out of their natural habitat in large safari parks. If we cannot provide this environment, then they need to be left in the wild, undisturbed, so they can thrive without human interference.

 

Text 2: Our job is to care.

As zoo keepers, our job is to care for the animals under our protection. We are highly skilled and trained in catering to their individual needs and requirements and we take our responsibilities very seriously. Many of the animals in zoos are not safe when left in the wild. They are constantly at risk from poachers, climate change has left their habitats in ruins and the rising human population means that they regularly ‘fall out’ with their human neighbours. After all, would you like a giant anaconda or a pride of hungry lions living in your back garden?

For all of these reasons, we have an obligation to take some animals into our care, look after them, provide them with a chance to mate and keep their species alive and educate other people about why it is important to look after our planet and the creatures who live here. If we don’t carry out this vital work, we will lose some animal species - forever.

*******************

 

Reading Fiction: Coketown

Read this description of "Coketown" from the book Hard Times by Charles Dickens:

 

It was a town of red brick, or of brick that would have been red if the smoke and ashes had allowed it; but as matters stood, it was a town of unnatural red and black like the painted face of a savage. 

It was a town of machinery and tall chimneys, out of which interminable serpents of smoke trailed themselves for ever and ever, and never got uncoiled. 

It had a black canal in it, and a river that ran purple with ill-smelling dye, and vast piles of building full of windows where there was a rattling and a trembling all day long, and where the piston of the steam-engine worked monotonously up and down, like the head of an elephant in a state of melancholy madness. It contained several large streets all very like one another, and many small streets still more like one another, inhabited by people equally like one another, who all went in and out at the same hours, with the same sound upon the same pavements, to do the same work, and to whom every day was the same as yesterday and tomorrow, and every year the counterpart of the last and the next.

 

*******************

Read the following extract from a leaflet about creating a safe environment for babies and toddlers, then answer the questions.

 

How to 'baby-proof' your home.

 

 

Your baby probably loves being at home and being able to explore their environment. Unfortunately, the home is also the most common scene of accidents involving small children. That is why it is very important that you read this leaflet on how to make you home safe and follow the guidelines closely. 

According to The Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents, every year more than 5'000 people die in accidents in the home. Do you want one of those people to be your child? Read on for hints and tips to make your home safe.

1) In the kitchen. The kitchen can be a dangerous place for young children. If you can, fit a stair-gate across the door frame to keep children out completely. If this is not an option for your home, use baby locks on the lower cupboard doors, and make sure they cannot climb chairs to get to the work tops. Remove children from the kitchen if the oven or cooker hobs are on. Make sure knives are out of reach, even from tall or climbing toddlers.   

*******************

Compare two poems about London

 

Text One

London

by William Blake

 

 

I wander thro' each charter'd street,

Near where the charter'd Thames does flow.

And mark in every face I meet

Marks of weakness, marks of woe.

 

In every cry of every Man,

In every Infants cry of fear,

In every voice: in every ban,

The mind-forg'd manacles I hear

 

How the Chimney-sweepers cry

Every blackning Church appalls,

And the hapless Soldiers sigh

Runs in blood down Palace walls

 

But most thro' midnight streets I hear

How the youthful Harlots curse

Blasts the new-born Infants tear

And blights with plagues the Marriage hearse

 

Text Two

Extract from

London's Summer Morning

by Mary Robinson

Who has not waked to list the busy sounds

Of summer's morning, in the sultry smoke

Of noisy London? On the pavement hot

The sooty chimney-boy, with dingy face

And tatter'd covering, shrilly bawls his trade,

Rousing the sleepy housemaid. At the door

The milk-pail rattles, and the tinkling bell

Proclaims the dustman's office; while the street

Is lost in clouds impervious. Now begins

The din of hackney-coaches, waggons, carts;

While tinmen's shops, and noisy trunk-makers,

Knife-grinders, coopers, squeaking cork-cutters,

Fruit barrows, and the hunger-giving cries

Of vegetable venders, fill the air.

Now every shop displays its varied trade,

And the fresh-sprinkled pavement cools the feet

Of early walkers...

*******************

The word "nipperkin" means a drink, so Hardy is saying that if the two men in the poem had met in a pub, they could have enjoyed each other's company and had a good time, but because they met in battle, one had to kill the other.

 

Why would this message have been surprising at the time? Tick three boxes.

because Hardy did not drink alcohol

because people were brought up to think that they were better than foreign enemies

because he is saying that they are equals

because nipperkin is old-fashioned language

because he is showing that war can be meaningless

Re-read this stanza again:

 

I shot him dead because--
Because he was my foe,
Just so: my foe of course he was;
That's clear enough; although

 

The narrator is explaining why he killed the man. Is he sure of the reasons why?

Yes: because he was his foe: "That's clear enough".

No: he is trying to convince himself but repeats words and hesitates.

The writer uses a technique called irony in this poem, where he uses humour to shock the reader and say the opposite of what he really means.

 

For example, he says: "Yes; quaint and curious war is!" This suggests that war is a 'funny old business' and that we shouldn't worry too much about it, but the poem as a whole is showing us that we should worry; that it isn't funny to kill another human being at all.

 

What punctuation does Hardy use to suggest humour here?

a speech mark

a comma

an exclamation mark

a question mark

In this poem, the Italian Duke is showing a visitor one of his possessions at his castle. What are they looking at?

 

typical landscape in Italian region Tuscany - stock photo

an antique piece of furniture

a painting of the Duchess

a collection of jewels

Now reread the first part of the poem again:

 

*******************

That’s my last Duchess painted on the wall,

Looking as if she were alive. I call

That piece a wonder, now; Fra Pandolf’s hands

Worked busily a day, and there she stands.

Will’t please you sit and look at her? I said

“Fra Pandolf” by design, for never read

Strangers like you that pictured countenance,

The depth and passion of its earnest glance,

But to myself they turned (since none puts by

The curtain I have drawn for you, but I)

 

*******************

 

 

Select the lines below that show that the Duke is talking to somebody else even though they never speak.

That's my last Duchess painted on the wall

Will't please you sit and look at her?

(since none puts by The curtain I have drawn for you, but I)

I said "Fra Pandolf'' by design

The Duke pulls the curtains back to reveal the portrait. He is the only one allowed to do this. What do you think the poet is trying to reveal about his character with this detail?

 

Old room with empty picture frame - stock photo

That the Duke is the only person in the castle tall enough to reach.

That the Duke lives alone.

That the Duke is in charge and very controlling.

The Duke didn't tell the Duchess he was unhappy with her behaviour. What two reasons does he give for this?

 

*******************

Who’d stoop to blame

This sort of trifling? Even had you skill

In speech—which I have not—to make your will

Quite clear to such an one, and say, “Just this

Or that in you disgusts me; here you miss,

Or there exceed the mark”—and if she let

Herself be lessoned so, nor plainly set

Her wits to yours, forsooth, and made excuse—

E’en then would be some stooping; and I choose

Never to stoop.

 

*******************

He was scared of her.

He wasn't skilled in explaining himself clearly.

He didn't want to embarrass her.

He didn't want to 'stoop' or bow down to her in any way.

Overall (considering the sounds from Question 1), which poem contains sounds that are more positive about London, and which more negative?

 More positiveMore negative
Text One
Text Two

Although text two shows that the inhabitants of London are 'rough and ready'; "dingy face... shrilly bawls his trade", it is mostly positive.

 

Which three of the following statements are true?

The poem lists all the jobs people have to do.

The people are poor and hungry.

The noises show that people are hardworking and productive.

There is plenty to buy and trade.

Everyone in London is rich.

Read this student's work. Which of the following quotations would help to support their argument?

 

In Text Two, the writer emphasises how bustling and busy the city is by using lists. She also demonstrates that there is plenty to buy, suggesting a thriving place: ____________________.

"every shop displays its varied trade"

"the sooty chimney-boy"

"noisy trunk-makers"

Match up the poem with the correct description.

Column A

Column B

Text One: London
Poor, ignorant and unpleasant people living misera...
Text Two: London's Summer Morning
Simple but industrious people, working hard and en...

In text 1, the writer uses the word 'gawp' to describe how humans look at animals in zoos.

How does choosing this word support his or her argument? Choose three answers.

It is negative, like zoos.

It shows a lack of respect for the animals.

It is fun to gawp and zoos are fun.

It is only done by stupid people, suggesting that people who like zoos are stupid.

It is informal language and is used to create a friendly tone.

In text 2, the writer uses the pronouns 'our' and 'we' throughout his or her argument, even saying "as zoo keepers, our job is to care for the animals under our protection".The readers are not all zoo keepers, so why has the writer chosen to do this? Choose three answers.

It shows that zoo keepers are people just like us.

Because they want all of the readers to become zoo keepers.

It is repetitive to show how boring the job really is.

It makes the reader feel that they are being spoken to as an equal.

It makes us think that their argument must be right if they are so fair and reasonable.

Read this extract from text 1.

 

But do they ever get the chance to run as they were designed to do? To hunt? To eat a variety of foods, as they would do in the wild? Do they get chance to choose their own mate? To climb up trees? To fly?

 

Which literary device does the author use here several times?

Both of the writers make assumptions. They assume things will always happen in a certain way.

Read this extract from text 1:

 

If we cannot provide this environment, then they need to be left in the wild, undisturbed, so they can thrive without human interference.

 

What assumption is being made here? Choose one answer.

That everyone wants to visit zoos.

That animals will always do better in the wild than in zoos.

That there is always enough space for a safari park.

The two texts represent two very different points of view. Complete the table below to show which text each statement agrees with.

 Text 1Text 2
zoos are degrading to animals
zoos are useful for breeding endangered species
zoos are inhumane
zoos are run by talented people
zoos provide protection for animals
zoos are unfair

The writer uses two images of animals in his description:

"interminable serpents of smoke trailed themselves for ever and ever, and never got uncoiled."

... and...

"the piston of the steam-engine worked monotonously up and down, like the head of an elephant in a state of melancholy madness."

 

Which of the following points would be the best one to make about these quotations?

Nature is not allowed to do what it should, everything is confined by the work of the town.

The work is boring and repetitive.

Working hard will drive you mad.

Read this quotation from the extract:

"It contained several large streets all very like one another, and many small streets still more like one another, inhabited by people equally like one another,"

 

Which of the following statements are NOT true? Tick three boxes.

Coketown is a creative place.

Coketown is grim.

Coketown is a vibrant town.

Coketown has a diverse population.

Coketown is unappealing.

What point do you think Dickens is making about how society was organised in Victorian times, through his description in this extract?

That people were lucky to have a job in a factory.

That people should move into towns to look for work.

That life was hard for poor people and they had a poor quality of life.

Read this point and explanation. Which of the following quotations would be the best one to use?

 

I think that Charles Dickens did a lot for the poor people in Victorian England. By describing what life was like, day-in, day-out, he makes the reader have sympathy towards poor people: _________________________________________________________________ The writer is encouraging us to feel trapped by the life which is described, here.  

 

People equally like one another.

Every day was the same as yesterday, and tomorrow.

Many small streets.

Choose which of the experiences given below belong to the Victorian middle class, and which are the experience of the Victorian poor.

 Middle classPoor people
greater range of food
chance of work in factories
chance to be a manager in the factories
leisure time to read books
dirty and physical work
more luxury items to buy
little or no choice about where you lived
forced to work long hours for basic pay

The writer keeps on using a personal pronoun to engage with the reader and stress how important safety is. Which personal pronoun does he or she keep using?

You

We

I

Another technique the writer uses is a rhetorical question to shock the reader into action. Find the rhetorical question in the text and copy it into the box below.

 

You will only get a mark if you spell and punctuate the sentence precisely. (Remember, you can look at the text again by clicking on the Help button above).

The writer quotes the Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents, who state that every year 5000 people die in accidents in the home. Which TWO techniques are being used here?

rhetorical question

statistics

quoting a reliable source

alliteration

Match the Purpose, Audience, Language and Layout of this leaflet.

Column A

Column B

Purpose
Formal but simple
Audience
Parents of small children
Language
Clear, informative
Layout
To inform and persuade

Choose the correct spelling of the following word.

perceive

percieve

Choose the correct spelling of the following word.

receipt

reciept

Choose the correct spelling of the following word.

foreign

foriegn

Choose the correct spelling of the following word.

beleive

believe

Complete the missing word in the following sentence.

 

We made a spontan______ decision to go on a bike ride because the weather was so nice.

 

(Write the whole word in the answer box.)

Complete the missing word in the following sentence.

 

My uncle won a very prestig______ award for designing the new library in our town.

 

(Write the whole word in the answer box.)

Here is an adjective in a sentence. From the options below, select the correct comparative and the superlative of the same adjective.

 

 

Monday was a bad day when we were rained off but Friday was ____________ and Saturday was ____________ day because we lost the match.

worse

worser

worstest

the worst

Here is an adjective in a sentence. From the options below, select the correct comparative and the superlative of the same adjective.

 

 

Paris was beautiful but when I saw Rome I thought it was _______________ and Florence was_____________ of all the places we visited.

beautifuller

beautiful

more beautiful

beautifullest

the most beautiful

Here is an adjective in a sentence. From the options below, select the correct comparative and the superlative of the same adjective.

 

 

This coin is quite valuable but that one is ______________.  The old sovereign is the ____________ in the whole collection.

valuabler

more valuable

valuablest

top value

most valuable

A person who is careful with money can be described using the following adjectives. This time, tick two words with negative connotations.

thrifty

miserly

economical

parsimonious

prudent

A person who is determined and does not give way easily can be described using the following adjectives. Two are positive and two are negative. Tick the positive adjectives.

stubborn

steadfast

resolute

obstinate

All the following adjectives can be used to describe an adult who is behaving in a manner normally associated with children. They are all negative except one. Tick the positive adjective.

childish

infantile

childlike

puerile

babyish

What is the name of the rhythm often used in Shakespeare's poetic writing, consisting of one unstressed syllable followed by a stressed syllable?

Example: "but SOFT what LIGHT through YONder WINdow BREAKS?"

couplets

iambic pentameter

cyclical

free verse

How could the Elizabethan society, in which women were seen as inferior and expected to obey their male relatives, be categorised?

patriarchal

matriarchal

equal

What was the name of the theatre that many of Shakespeare's plays were performed in?

The World

The Ocean

The Globe

The Atlas

  • Question 1

The word "nipperkin" means a drink, so Hardy is saying that if the two men in the poem had met in a pub, they could have enjoyed each other's company and had a good time, but because they met in battle, one had to kill the other.

 

Why would this message have been surprising at the time? Tick three boxes.

CORRECT ANSWER
because people were brought up to think that they were better than foreign enemies
because he is saying that they are equals
because he is showing that war can be meaningless
EDDIE SAYS
The message in the poem would have been surprising to readers at the time that it was written because, in those days, people were taught to think that foreign enemies were below them and that they would not have anything in common with them. By stating that the two men would have enjoyed each other's company, he is suggesting that the act of war and killing is meaningless.
  • Question 2

Re-read this stanza again:

 

I shot him dead because--
Because he was my foe,
Just so: my foe of course he was;
That's clear enough; although

 

The narrator is explaining why he killed the man. Is he sure of the reasons why?

CORRECT ANSWER
No: he is trying to convince himself but repeats words and hesitates.
EDDIE SAYS
It is clear from this stanza that the narrator is trying to convince himself that he has done the right thing. By repeating "he was my foe [...] my foe of course he was" suggests that he is trying to focus on the fact that the soldier was his enemy, and not feel any guilt for killing him.
  • Question 3

The writer uses a technique called irony in this poem, where he uses humour to shock the reader and say the opposite of what he really means.

 

For example, he says: "Yes; quaint and curious war is!" This suggests that war is a 'funny old business' and that we shouldn't worry too much about it, but the poem as a whole is showing us that we should worry; that it isn't funny to kill another human being at all.

 

What punctuation does Hardy use to suggest humour here?

CORRECT ANSWER
an exclamation mark
EDDIE SAYS
The use of the exclamation mark causes the sentence to stand out and suggests to the reader that it is not supposed to be taken seriously, but to shock the reader and to emphasise the casual way in which the soldier in the poem is killed simply "Because he was my foe".
  • Question 4

In this poem, the Italian Duke is showing a visitor one of his possessions at his castle. What are they looking at?

 

typical landscape in Italian region Tuscany - stock photo

CORRECT ANSWER
a painting of the Duchess
EDDIE SAYS
The Duke is showing a visitor to the castle a painting of the Duchess.
  • Question 5

Now reread the first part of the poem again:

 

*******************

That’s my last Duchess painted on the wall,

Looking as if she were alive. I call

That piece a wonder, now; Fra Pandolf’s hands

Worked busily a day, and there she stands.

Will’t please you sit and look at her? I said

“Fra Pandolf” by design, for never read

Strangers like you that pictured countenance,

The depth and passion of its earnest glance,

But to myself they turned (since none puts by

The curtain I have drawn for you, but I)

 

*******************

 

 

Select the lines below that show that the Duke is talking to somebody else even though they never speak.

CORRECT ANSWER
Will't please you sit and look at her?
(since none puts by The curtain I have drawn for you, but I)
EDDIE SAYS
The lines that show the Duke is speaking to someone else are:
"Will't please you sit and look at her?"
"(since none puts by The curtain I have drawn for you, but I)"
  • Question 6

The Duke pulls the curtains back to reveal the portrait. He is the only one allowed to do this. What do you think the poet is trying to reveal about his character with this detail?

 

Old room with empty picture frame - stock photo

CORRECT ANSWER
That the Duke is in charge and very controlling.
EDDIE SAYS
The detail of the Duke drawing back the curtains reveals to the reader that the Duke is in charge and very controlling.
  • Question 7

The Duke didn't tell the Duchess he was unhappy with her behaviour. What two reasons does he give for this?

 

*******************

Who’d stoop to blame

This sort of trifling? Even had you skill

In speech—which I have not—to make your will

Quite clear to such an one, and say, “Just this

Or that in you disgusts me; here you miss,

Or there exceed the mark”—and if she let

Herself be lessoned so, nor plainly set

Her wits to yours, forsooth, and made excuse—

E’en then would be some stooping; and I choose

Never to stoop.

 

*******************

CORRECT ANSWER
He wasn't skilled in explaining himself clearly.
He didn't want to 'stoop' or bow down to her in any way.
EDDIE SAYS
The Duke didn't tell the Duchess he was unhappy with her behaviour because he wasn't skilled in explaining himself clearly and he didn't want to 'stoop' or bow down to her in any way.
  • Question 8

Overall (considering the sounds from Question 1), which poem contains sounds that are more positive about London, and which more negative?

CORRECT ANSWER
 More positiveMore negative
Text One
Text Two
EDDIE SAYS
The tone of the poems, as revealed by the noises in the texts, is more negative in text one and more positive in text two.
  • Question 9

Although text two shows that the inhabitants of London are 'rough and ready'; "dingy face... shrilly bawls his trade", it is mostly positive.

 

Which three of the following statements are true?

CORRECT ANSWER
The poem lists all the jobs people have to do.
The noises show that people are hardworking and productive.
There is plenty to buy and trade.
  • Question 10

Read this student's work. Which of the following quotations would help to support their argument?

 

In Text Two, the writer emphasises how bustling and busy the city is by using lists. She also demonstrates that there is plenty to buy, suggesting a thriving place: ____________________.

CORRECT ANSWER
"every shop displays its varied trade"
  • Question 11

Match up the poem with the correct description.

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

Text One: London
Poor, ignorant and unpleasant peo...
Text Two: London's Summer Morning
Simple but industrious people, wo...
EDDIE SAYS
Text one displays a very negative image of the city, emphasising the hopelessness of the poor. Text two, however, displays a more positive image; highlighting the industrious and bustling nature of the city and the determination of its inhabitants to work hard and try and earn a living.
  • Question 12

In text 1, the writer uses the word 'gawp' to describe how humans look at animals in zoos.

How does choosing this word support his or her argument? Choose three answers.

CORRECT ANSWER
It is negative, like zoos.
It shows a lack of respect for the animals.
It is only done by stupid people, suggesting that people who like zoos are stupid.
EDDIE SAYS
The word gawp is negative, suggesting rudeness, stupidity and a general lack of respect. The writer has chosen it to show that zoos are degrading to animals.
  • Question 13

In text 2, the writer uses the pronouns 'our' and 'we' throughout his or her argument, even saying "as zoo keepers, our job is to care for the animals under our protection".The readers are not all zoo keepers, so why has the writer chosen to do this? Choose three answers.

CORRECT ANSWER
It shows that zoo keepers are people just like us.
It makes the reader feel that they are being spoken to as an equal.
It makes us think that their argument must be right if they are so fair and reasonable.
EDDIE SAYS
Using 'our' and 'we' identifies the reader with the writer so they are more likely to agree with their argument.
  • Question 14

Read this extract from text 1.

 

But do they ever get the chance to run as they were designed to do? To hunt? To eat a variety of foods, as they would do in the wild? Do they get chance to choose their own mate? To climb up trees? To fly?

 

Which literary device does the author use here several times?

CORRECT ANSWER
rhetorical question
rhetorical questions
  • Question 15

Both of the writers make assumptions. They assume things will always happen in a certain way.

Read this extract from text 1:

 

If we cannot provide this environment, then they need to be left in the wild, undisturbed, so they can thrive without human interference.

 

What assumption is being made here? Choose one answer.

CORRECT ANSWER
That animals will always do better in the wild than in zoos.
EDDIE SAYS
The assumption that animals always do better in the wild is countered by the arguments in text 2: animals might need to be in a zoo for the protection of their species.
  • Question 16

The two texts represent two very different points of view. Complete the table below to show which text each statement agrees with.

CORRECT ANSWER
 Text 1Text 2
zoos are degrading to animals
zoos are useful for breeding endangered species
zoos are inhumane
zoos are run by talented people
zoos provide protection for animals
zoos are unfair
  • Question 17

The writer uses two images of animals in his description:

"interminable serpents of smoke trailed themselves for ever and ever, and never got uncoiled."

... and...

"the piston of the steam-engine worked monotonously up and down, like the head of an elephant in a state of melancholy madness."

 

Which of the following points would be the best one to make about these quotations?

CORRECT ANSWER
Nature is not allowed to do what it should, everything is confined by the work of the town.
EDDIE SAYS
The first answer links both of the quotations together (as they are both about nature) and explains the point which Dickens is making about the unnatural way of life in Coketown.
  • Question 18

Read this quotation from the extract:

"It contained several large streets all very like one another, and many small streets still more like one another, inhabited by people equally like one another,"

 

Which of the following statements are NOT true? Tick three boxes.

CORRECT ANSWER
Coketown is a creative place.
Coketown is a vibrant town.
Coketown has a diverse population.
EDDIE SAYS
The description Dickens gives is of a grim and unattractive place, where life is monotonous and hard.
  • Question 19

What point do you think Dickens is making about how society was organised in Victorian times, through his description in this extract?

CORRECT ANSWER
That life was hard for poor people and they had a poor quality of life.
EDDIE SAYS
Dickens is emphasising the hardship that poor people suffered in Victorian times. He highlights the vast difference in the quality of life between rich people and poor people.
  • Question 20

Read this point and explanation. Which of the following quotations would be the best one to use?

 

I think that Charles Dickens did a lot for the poor people in Victorian England. By describing what life was like, day-in, day-out, he makes the reader have sympathy towards poor people: _________________________________________________________________ The writer is encouraging us to feel trapped by the life which is described, here.  

 

CORRECT ANSWER
Every day was the same as yesterday, and tomorrow.
EDDIE SAYS
The quotation "Every day was the same as yesterday, and tomorrow." emphasises the monotony of life in Coketown, and causes the reader to feel trapped by the claustrophobic nature of this lifestyle.
  • Question 21

Choose which of the experiences given below belong to the Victorian middle class, and which are the experience of the Victorian poor.

CORRECT ANSWER
 Middle classPoor people
greater range of food
chance of work in factories
chance to be a manager in the factories
leisure time to read books
dirty and physical work
more luxury items to buy
little or no choice about where you lived
forced to work long hours for basic pay
  • Question 22

The writer keeps on using a personal pronoun to engage with the reader and stress how important safety is. Which personal pronoun does he or she keep using?

CORRECT ANSWER
You
  • Question 23

Another technique the writer uses is a rhetorical question to shock the reader into action. Find the rhetorical question in the text and copy it into the box below.

 

You will only get a mark if you spell and punctuate the sentence precisely. (Remember, you can look at the text again by clicking on the Help button above).

CORRECT ANSWER
Do you want one of those people to be your child?
  • Question 24

The writer quotes the Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents, who state that every year 5000 people die in accidents in the home. Which TWO techniques are being used here?

CORRECT ANSWER
statistics
quoting a reliable source
  • Question 25

Match the Purpose, Audience, Language and Layout of this leaflet.

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

Purpose
To inform and persuade
Audience
Parents of small children
Language
Formal but simple
Layout
Clear, informative
  • Question 26

Choose the correct spelling of the following word.

CORRECT ANSWER
perceive
EDDIE SAYS
'Perceive' follows the rule, as the word is spelled '...cei...'.
  • Question 27

Choose the correct spelling of the following word.

CORRECT ANSWER
receipt
EDDIE SAYS
'Receipt' also follows the 'i before e except after c' rule.
  • Question 28

Choose the correct spelling of the following word.

CORRECT ANSWER
foreign
EDDIE SAYS
'Foreign' is an exception to the rule, as the 'e' comes before the 'i' despite there being no 'c'.
  • Question 29

Choose the correct spelling of the following word.

CORRECT ANSWER
believe
EDDIE SAYS
Finally, 'believe' follows the 'i before e except after c' rule.
  • Question 30

Complete the missing word in the following sentence.

 

We made a spontan______ decision to go on a bike ride because the weather was so nice.

 

(Write the whole word in the answer box.)

CORRECT ANSWER
spontaneous
EDDIE SAYS
If something is 'spontaneous' it means it is done without being planned in advance.
  • Question 31

Complete the missing word in the following sentence.

 

My uncle won a very prestig______ award for designing the new library in our town.

 

(Write the whole word in the answer box.)

CORRECT ANSWER
prestigious
EDDIE SAYS
'Prestigious' means having high status or inspiring respect.
  • Question 32

Here is an adjective in a sentence. From the options below, select the correct comparative and the superlative of the same adjective.

 

 

Monday was a bad day when we were rained off but Friday was ____________ and Saturday was ____________ day because we lost the match.

CORRECT ANSWER
worse
the worst
  • Question 33

Here is an adjective in a sentence. From the options below, select the correct comparative and the superlative of the same adjective.

 

 

Paris was beautiful but when I saw Rome I thought it was _______________ and Florence was_____________ of all the places we visited.

CORRECT ANSWER
more beautiful
the most beautiful
  • Question 34

Here is an adjective in a sentence. From the options below, select the correct comparative and the superlative of the same adjective.

 

 

This coin is quite valuable but that one is ______________.  The old sovereign is the ____________ in the whole collection.

CORRECT ANSWER
more valuable
most valuable
  • Question 35

A person who is careful with money can be described using the following adjectives. This time, tick two words with negative connotations.

CORRECT ANSWER
miserly
parsimonious
EDDIE SAYS
The adjective 'parsimonious' suggests that the person involved is unwilling to spend money rather than unable to.
  • Question 36

A person who is determined and does not give way easily can be described using the following adjectives. Two are positive and two are negative. Tick the positive adjectives.

CORRECT ANSWER
steadfast
resolute
EDDIE SAYS
The word 'steadfast' also has the meaning of being reliable.
  • Question 37

All the following adjectives can be used to describe an adult who is behaving in a manner normally associated with children. They are all negative except one. Tick the positive adjective.

CORRECT ANSWER
childlike
EDDIE SAYS
Although 'childish' and 'childlike' seem very similar, 'childlike' is usually used affectionately for someone who is behaving in an innocent and trusting way.
  • Question 38

What is the name of the rhythm often used in Shakespeare's poetic writing, consisting of one unstressed syllable followed by a stressed syllable?

Example: "but SOFT what LIGHT through YONder WINdow BREAKS?"

CORRECT ANSWER
iambic pentameter
  • Question 39

How could the Elizabethan society, in which women were seen as inferior and expected to obey their male relatives, be categorised?

CORRECT ANSWER
patriarchal
  • Question 40

What was the name of the theatre that many of Shakespeare's plays were performed in?

CORRECT ANSWER
The Globe
---- OR ----

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