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Analyse Key Quotes in 'Journey's End'

In this worksheet, students will explore quotations and analyse what they might show about a character, theme or idea in the play 'Journey's End'.

'Analyse Key Quotes in 'Journey's End'' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 4

Curriculum topic:  

Curriculum subtopic:  

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

"Red"       Blood     Violence

 

 

In the exam, you will need be able to look at the connotations of words.

 

A connotation is meaning that is not explicitly stated, but meaning that is implied or suggested.

 

In the example above, we can see the connotations of the word 'red' in 'Journey's End'. Taking the context of World War I into consideration, the word might make us think of bloodshed, which is suggestive of violence. Here we are exploring the connotations of the word. 

 

In the exam, you will need to select quotations and analyse what they show. In order to do this you will need to explore the connotations of the words.

 

Have a go at the following questions, which will help you to think about what quotations suggest about particular characters, themes or ideas in 'Journey's End.'

The dugout is described in the opening stage directions.

 

Match the following quotations to what they suggest about the conditions in the dugout.

Column A

Column B

"Gloomy tunnels"
Dark, cramped and claustrophobic
"No furniture"
Cold
"The earth walls deaden the sounds of war, making ...
Basic, minimalist and lacking home comforts
"Damp air"
Quiet

Hardy is the first character we meet. He provides a handover to Osborne.

 

Read the quotation below:

 

"Osborne: Did you check it when your took over?

Hardy: No. I think the sergeant-major did. It's quite all right."

 

Which of the sentences below best describes what is revealed about Hardy's character in this quotation.

Hardy appears to be a sensible, organised and hard working leader

Hardy appears to be a disorganised leader, who has a sloppy attitude

In Act one when Raleigh arrives, Osborne hints at what men need to do in order to survive on the front line.

 

In the section of text from "Did you come up by trench tonight?", to Mason's arrival on the scene, which quotation shows Osborne giving advice about how to cope?

 

Write the quotation below, using quotation marks correctly.

Which word below best describes the feeling revealed in the following quotation spoken by Stanhope:

 

"I'm captain of this company. What's that bloody little prig of a boy matter? D'you see? He's a little prig. Wants to write home and tell Madge all about me"

Shame

Fear

Respect

Match the following quotations to their effect on the audience watching 'Journey's End.'

Column A

Column B

"It's a wonderful morning"
The audience is reminded that the waiting will end...
"Standing up there in the dark last night there di...
The quiet is eerily unsettling, building anticipat...
"The big attack soon, I reckon"
Builds a false sense of security, foreshadowing th...

In the scene where Hibbert begs Stanhope to be sent away from the front line for treatment, Stanhope says:

 

"Because I feel the same - exactly the same! Every little noise up there makes me feel - just as you feel. Why didn't you talk to me instead of talking about neuralgia? We all feel like you do sometimes, if you only knew. I hate and loathe it all"

 

What themes are explored here? 

Fear

Pyschological effects of war

Loyalty

Comradeship

Social class

What do the following quotations from the scene where the raid is being planned show about the characters of Stanhope and the Colonel? Match the quotation down the side to what it shows about the character along the top.

 'They can't have it later because of dinner I suppose?''didn't you suggest we altered our plans?''I've done all I can''It's no good getting depressed'
Also following orders
Questions the strategy
Naive
Bitter and critical of senior ranks

Sherriff uses the stage directions to indicate aspects of staging the audience would experience. Sound is important to the play in building anticipation and conveying the fear and terror that would have been felt by the soldiers.

 

Underline all of the words in the stage directions that show how sound would have been used.

There is silence in the trenches about the deserted dugout. Then, suddenly, there comes the dull \'crush\' of bursting smoke bombs, followed in a second by the vicious rattle of machine- guns. The red and green glow of German alarm rockets comes faintly through the dugout door. The comes the thin whistle and crash of falling shells\'

Sherriff uses colour in his set to create atmosphere. In the very last set of stage directions, colour imagery is used to suggest the death and violence of the attack.

 

Identify one word from the last set of stage directions to show how colour is used.

Now it is time to have a go at writing an analytical paragraph practising the skills learnt in this activity.

 

Task: What does the following quotation show?

Act 2, Scene 2 -  

'Trotter: And even then our fellers 'ad to make the raid. It was murder.'

 

In your paragraph, try to comment on the connotations of key words in the quotation and link back to the context in which Sherriff was writing.

  • Question 1

The dugout is described in the opening stage directions.

 

Match the following quotations to what they suggest about the conditions in the dugout.

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

"Gloomy tunnels"
Dark, cramped and claustrophobic
"No furniture"
Basic, minimalist and lacking hom...
"The earth walls deaden the sound...
Quiet
"Damp air"
Cold
EDDIE SAYS
Remember that it's important to look at the connotations of words - what do they suggest to us? The stage directions here show what the audience would see on the stage and help build a particular atmosphere. For example "tunnels" is suggestive of small spaces, perhaps with the need to bend down to move, giving a claustrophobic feel.
  • Question 2

Hardy is the first character we meet. He provides a handover to Osborne.

 

Read the quotation below:

 

"Osborne: Did you check it when your took over?

Hardy: No. I think the sergeant-major did. It's quite all right."

 

Which of the sentences below best describes what is revealed about Hardy's character in this quotation.

CORRECT ANSWER
Hardy appears to be a disorganised leader, who has a sloppy attitude
EDDIE SAYS
Looking at this quotation in context would help to think about it more deeply. Hardy is presented in this scene as disorganised and messy, a contrast to Stanhope, who he describes a "fussy" about the cleanliness of the trenches. In the quotation above, Osborne is checking everything is in order before Hardy leaves, and Hardy's admittance that he hasn't checked the trench stores shows that he isn't taking his role very seriously and is happy to leave it to others. "It's quite all right" is a blasé attitude to have when leading a company. Sherriff contrasts Hardy's character with Stanhope,who appears to be a much more responsible leader.
  • Question 3

In Act one when Raleigh arrives, Osborne hints at what men need to do in order to survive on the front line.

 

In the section of text from "Did you come up by trench tonight?", to Mason's arrival on the scene, which quotation shows Osborne giving advice about how to cope?

 

Write the quotation below, using quotation marks correctly.

CORRECT ANSWER
"You must always think of it like that if you can. Think of it all as -as romantic. It helps"
"You must always think of it like that if you can. Think of it all as -as romantic"
"Think of it all as -as romantic. It helps"
EDDIE SAYS
The idea of thinking of things as romantic here suggests that the harsh reality is too much to bear. Osborne gives advice to the young and naïve Raleigh, knowing that his innocence will soon be taken away. Sherriff wanted to show how many of the men on the front line experienced such horror that they would be affected psychologically. Osborne in his fatherly way hints here at the need for a coping mechanism.
  • Question 4

Which word below best describes the feeling revealed in the following quotation spoken by Stanhope:

 

"I'm captain of this company. What's that bloody little prig of a boy matter? D'you see? He's a little prig. Wants to write home and tell Madge all about me"

CORRECT ANSWER
Shame
EDDIE SAYS
This is a tricky one! Stanhope really shows shame here, because the reason he's angry that Raleigh has joined the company is because he's ashamed of how being on the front line has changed him. His heavy drinking is a coping mechanism; he's ashamed that this is what he has become and doesn't want people he knew before the war, especially a potential lover, to know the reality. He doesn't feel he deserves the title of a hero anymore.
  • Question 5

Match the following quotations to their effect on the audience watching 'Journey's End.'

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

"It's a wonderful morning"
Builds a false sense of security,...
"Standing up there in the dark la...
The quiet is eerily unsettling, b...
"The big attack soon, I reckon"
The audience is reminded that the...
EDDIE SAYS
Much anticipation is built up in the play through Sherriff's focus on the quiet and the waiting. We're regularly given reminders that this is a false sense of security and that an attack is imminent. Indeed we see Trotter counting down on his chart to the day of attack. The lovely weather and spring-like features only serve to heighten the tension, because we know that the beauty of nature will soon be destroyed.
  • Question 6

In the scene where Hibbert begs Stanhope to be sent away from the front line for treatment, Stanhope says:

 

"Because I feel the same - exactly the same! Every little noise up there makes me feel - just as you feel. Why didn't you talk to me instead of talking about neuralgia? We all feel like you do sometimes, if you only knew. I hate and loathe it all"

 

What themes are explored here? 

CORRECT ANSWER
Fear
Pyschological effects of war
Comradeship
EDDIE SAYS
All of these themes are explored in the play, but it's important to look at what individual quotations show. Here we see Stanhope opening up to Hibbert, revealing his own vulnerabilities. He admits that he also feels fearful. Sherriff highlights how fear would have affected men on the front line psychologically; we see Hibbert lying about neuralgia because he is so desperate not to continue, whereas we know that Stanhope turns to drink for comfort. Comradeship is also a key theme here as Stanhope treats Hibbert with compassion and offers an understanding ear.
  • Question 7

What do the following quotations from the scene where the raid is being planned show about the characters of Stanhope and the Colonel? Match the quotation down the side to what it shows about the character along the top.

CORRECT ANSWER
 'They can't have it later because of dinner I suppose?''didn't you suggest we altered our plans?''I've done all I can''It's no good getting depressed'
Also following orders
Questions the strategy
Naive
Bitter and critical of senior ranks
EDDIE SAYS
How did you do? In this scene, Sherriff contrasts the two characters of Stanhope and the Colonel. We see Stanhope questioning the strategy and decision making and making sarcastic comments about the senior ranks. On the other hand, the Colonel makes some flippant comments that really contrast the severity of the situation, brushing aside the harsh reality. However, Sherriff does highlight that he is also only taking orders and not really to blame.
  • Question 8

Sherriff uses the stage directions to indicate aspects of staging the audience would experience. Sound is important to the play in building anticipation and conveying the fear and terror that would have been felt by the soldiers.

 

Underline all of the words in the stage directions that show how sound would have been used.

CORRECT ANSWER
There is silence in the trenches about the deserted dugout. Then, suddenly, there comes the dull 'crush' of bursting smoke bombs, followed in a second by the vicious rattle of machine- guns. The red and green glow of German alarm rockets comes faintly through the dugout door. The comes the thin whistle and crash of falling shells'
EDDIE SAYS
How did you do? Did you find them all? Whilst Sherriff depicts a lot of quiet and waiting in the trenches, his focus on sound in his staging helps to build the anticipation and fear that there's an attack approaching. He reminds the audience that this terror is only just outside the walls of the dugout, foreshadowing the incoming attack that will cause devastation to the company.
  • Question 9

Sherriff uses colour in his set to create atmosphere. In the very last set of stage directions, colour imagery is used to suggest the death and violence of the attack.

 

Identify one word from the last set of stage directions to show how colour is used.

CORRECT ANSWER
Darkness
Red dawn
Red
EDDIE SAYS
Nearly! The quotations in the last section of stage directions where colour is used are 'There is darkness in the dugout.' and 'the red dawn glows'. Light has played a large part in previous stage directions and here we see how darkness permeates, suggesting death, while the 'red dawn' is evocative of the blood shed following the attack. This colour imagery would be very powerful to the audience watching, having experienced war and probably the loss of loved ones themselves.
  • Question 10

Now it is time to have a go at writing an analytical paragraph practising the skills learnt in this activity.

 

Task: What does the following quotation show?

Act 2, Scene 2 -  

'Trotter: And even then our fellers 'ad to make the raid. It was murder.'

 

In your paragraph, try to comment on the connotations of key words in the quotation and link back to the context in which Sherriff was writing.

CORRECT ANSWER
Preview ---- OR ----

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