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The Romantics: 'A Red, Red Rose' by Robert Burns

In this series of worksheets, students learn about The Romantics. This worksheet focuses on the poem 'A Red, Red Rose' by Robert Burns.

'The Romantics: 'A Red, Red Rose' by Robert Burns' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 4

Curriculum topic:  Reading

Curriculum subtopic:  Read a Wide Range of High-Quality Texts

Difficulty level:  

down

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

This worksheet is part of a series based on the Romantic poets. Read the following poem 'A Red, Red Rose' (1794) by Robert Burns and then answer the questions that follow.

 

 

******************

A Red, Red Rose

 

O my Luve's like a red, red rose

That's newly sprung in June; 

O my Luve's like the melodie

That's sweetly play'd in tune.

 

As fair art thou, my bonnie lass,

So deep in luve am I;

And I will luve thee still, my dear,

Till a' the seas gang dry.

 

Till a' the seas gang dry, my dear,

And the rocks melt wi' the sun;

I will luve thee still, my dear,

While the sands o' life shall run.

 

And fare thee well, my only Luve

And fare thee well, a while! 

And I will come again, my Luve,

Tho' it were ten thousand mile.

******************

Robert Burns was a Scottish writer and wrote using Scottish dialect. Match the dialectal words from the poem with their meanings.

Column A

Column B

luve
love
bonnie
go
lass
girl
gang
pretty

In the opening stanza the poet uses two cliched images to compare his love to. What are they?

a red rose

the sea

the sun

a song

What poetic technique does Burns use in stanza one to compare his love?

personification

similes

metaphors

By comparing his love to a rose, what aspect of her is he describing?

her beauty

her thorniness

her smell

Reread stanza three and decide on three images to go with it. Choose from the list below.

 

 

******************

Till a' the seas gang dry, my dear,

And the rocks melt wi' the sun;

I will luve thee still, my dear,

While the sands o' life shall run.

 

******************

sea

rocks

river

tree

sun

What do you think Burns is saying about his love through these images?

That his love will change.

That his love will disappear.

That his love is strong and will last for eternity.

The final stanza has a shift in tone. What do we learn in this stanza?

We learn that he is breaking up with his love.

We learn that he has to leave his love and travel away from her.

We learn that he has met somebody else.

This poem was written as a song. What features of the poem suit it being set to music?

the powerful words

the rhyme and rhythm

the different stanzas

This poem is written in a ballad form. Research the ballad form and tick the three features that Burns' poem shares with other ballads.

It has four lines in each stanza.

It has five lines in each stanza.

It has an ABCC rhyme scheme.

It has an ABCB rhyme scheme.

It has a regular rhythm.

  • Question 1

Robert Burns was a Scottish writer and wrote using Scottish dialect. Match the dialectal words from the poem with their meanings.

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

luve
love
bonnie
pretty
lass
girl
gang
go
EDDIE SAYS
luve = love
bonnie = pretty
lass = girl
gang = go
  • Question 2

In the opening stanza the poet uses two cliched images to compare his love to. What are they?

CORRECT ANSWER
a red rose
a song
EDDIE SAYS
The poet compares his love to a red rose and a song.
  • Question 3

What poetic technique does Burns use in stanza one to compare his love?

CORRECT ANSWER
similes
EDDIE SAYS
Burns uses similes to compare his love.
  • Question 4

By comparing his love to a rose, what aspect of her is he describing?

CORRECT ANSWER
her beauty
EDDIE SAYS
By comparing his love to a rose, Burns is describing her beauty.
  • Question 5

Reread stanza three and decide on three images to go with it. Choose from the list below.

 

 

******************

Till a' the seas gang dry, my dear,

And the rocks melt wi' the sun;

I will luve thee still, my dear,

While the sands o' life shall run.

 

******************

CORRECT ANSWER
sea
rocks
sun
EDDIE SAYS
Images that could go with this stanza are sea, rocks and sun.
  • Question 6

What do you think Burns is saying about his love through these images?

CORRECT ANSWER
That his love is strong and will last for eternity.
EDDIE SAYS
Through the images in stanza three, Burns is suggesting that his love is strong and will last for eternity.
  • Question 7

The final stanza has a shift in tone. What do we learn in this stanza?

CORRECT ANSWER
We learn that he has to leave his love and travel away from her.
EDDIE SAYS
In the final stanza we learn that he has to leave his love and travel away from her.
  • Question 8

This poem was written as a song. What features of the poem suit it being set to music?

CORRECT ANSWER
the rhyme and rhythm
EDDIE SAYS
The rhyme and rhythm suit the poem being set to music.
  • Question 9

This poem is written in a ballad form. Research the ballad form and tick the three features that Burns' poem shares with other ballads.

CORRECT ANSWER
It has four lines in each stanza.
It has an ABCB rhyme scheme.
It has a regular rhythm.
EDDIE SAYS
Burns' poem is similar to other ballads in that it has four lines in each stanza, it has an ABCB rhyme scheme and it has a regular rhythm.
---- OR ----

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