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Evaluate Language Techniques in 'Ozymandias'

In this worksheet, students will be tested on their evaluation of language. Students will be able to practice why certain words are used and the effect of these words on the theme, tone and context of the poem, 'Ozymandias'.

'Evaluate Language Techniques in 'Ozymandias'' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 4

Curriculum topic:  

Curriculum subtopic:  

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

Want to revise your language evaluation skills in 'Ozymandias'?

 

Thought bubble

 

Hopefully, you know 'Ozymandias' well enough by now to be able to evaluate Shelley's choices of language in the poem. Now remember, evaluating language is actually quite simple if you break it down into these two points:

 

What attitudes are expressed by the poet, through this language choice?

 

What effect does this word have on you, the reader?

 

 

When we break up our language evaluation into these two points, it is easier to get into the nitty gritty of word choice.  It also helps to evaluate language by putting ourselves into the speaker of the poem's shoes. Why does the poet use specific words and what is the effect of these words?

 

 

Here's an example of language evaluation to get you going. Don't worry, you won't have to do anything as long as this in the exercise.

 

Early on in the poem, Shelley writes about Ozymandias "two vast and trunkless legs of stone". Shelley uses the adjectives "vast" and "trunkless" to portray a contrasting idea. Ozymandias' statue is big and great, hence the adjective "vast" but it is also "trunkless", suggesting that the statue is a missing a vital part of itself.  Shelley portrays contrasting ideas in order to, perhaps, present Ozymandias' idea of himself (vast) in contrast to the way other's view him (trunkless). Thus, through this description, we have our first insight into Ozymandias as great- big in size- but arrogant, cruel and delusional about his own sense of power. He is "trunkless" and, therefore, lacking in some way.

 

"Half sunk, a shattered visage lies..."

 

 

Fill in the blank spaces with the correct words from below. Don't worry about adding quotation marks.

 

repetition

noun

verb

adjective

"half sunk"

"visage"

"shattered"

lasted

legacy

increased

decreased

Why do you think that Shelley has used Ozymandias' direct speech near the end of the poem? Tick the one answer that you think is correct.

 

 

Because we are given an insight into Ozymandias' culture and way of life

Because we are given an insight into Ozymandias' past

Because we are given a direct insight into Ozymandias' imagined arrogance

Because we are given a direct insight into Ozymandias' feelings and beliefs

Check two examples of sibilance of the 's' sound in the poem.

"sneer of cold command"

"which yet service, stamped on these lifeless things"

"half sunk. a shattered visage lies"

"boundless and bare..."

Tick the one answer which best explains why the poem is a sonnet.

 

Because Ozymandias hates his subjects

Because Ozymandias loves himself

The sonnet form is ironic as no one loves Ozymandias except himself

The sooner form is ironic because no one loves Ozymandias not even himself

"look on my words, ye mighty, and despair! Nothing beside remains..."

 

 

What does this quote suggest about Ozymandias' legacy?

 

Fill in the blank spaces.

 

arrogance

rough

pleasant

unconventional

sad

masculine

instability

Because Ozymandias hates his subjects

Because Ozymandias loves himself

The sonnet form is ironic as no one loves Ozymandias except himself

The sooner form is ironic because no one loves Ozymandias not even himself

"...boundless and bare"

 

Write down the device that Shelley uses in this quote, and its effect. 

 

You should be able to get it down in two sentences.

"king of kings..."

 

 

How does this quote convey Ozymandias' personality

 

Look at;

- the device used

- how this device conveys' Ozymandias' arrogance

 

You get two marks for two sentences

Name one adjective used in the poem which reflects the Ozymandias' cruelty in line 5.

 

"the lone and level sands stretch far away"

 

 

Evaluate the use of the words "lone" and "far".

 

  1. What kind of word classification is used?
  2. What effect does this word have?

 

You get two marks for two sentences. 

"the hand that mocked them..."

 

 Evaluate Shelley's use of the word "mocked" 

 

Again, remember to identify what type of word classification the word is.

 

What does this word suggest about Ozymandias' personality?

 

You get two marks for two sentences

  • Question 1

"Half sunk, a shattered visage lies..."

 

 

Fill in the blank spaces with the correct words from below. Don't worry about adding quotation marks.

 

repetition

noun

verb

adjective

"half sunk"

"visage"

"shattered"

lasted

legacy

increased

decreased

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Practising how to write out language evaluations should help you get into the swing of things.
  • Question 2

Why do you think that Shelley has used Ozymandias' direct speech near the end of the poem? Tick the one answer that you think is correct.

 

 

CORRECT ANSWER
Because we are given a direct insight into Ozymandias' imagined arrogance
EDDIE SAYS
Option three is correct! Direct speech (even imagined, in this case) gives us an insight into how arrogant and cruel he must have been!
  • Question 3

Check two examples of sibilance of the 's' sound in the poem.

CORRECT ANSWER
"which yet service, stamped on these lifeless things"
"half sunk. a shattered visage lies"
EDDIE SAYS
The middle two quotes give good examples of sibilance. The effect of sibilance depends on the type of poem we are reading about- so when you come across sibilance, analyse the tone of the poem and the context of the use of sibilance. In this case, Ozymandias is a horrible, arrogance and cruel king. So, the sibilance used to describe Ozymandias, creates a negative sounding tone of voice. Sibilance- used to portray a negative aspect of a character- imitates a hissing sound! So that repeated 's' sound (and the poem also contains assonance, meaning that 's' sound doesn't necessarily have to be at the beginning of the word, it can be within the word) shows how unpleasant Ozymandias is. Reading the poem aloud is like we are an audience- or his subjects- hissing at Ozymandias!
  • Question 4

Tick the one answer which best explains why the poem is a sonnet.

 

CORRECT ANSWER
The sonnet form is ironic as no one loves Ozymandias except himself
EDDIE SAYS
The irony of the sonnet form- and there's a tonne of irony in the poem- showcases Ozymandias' personality. No one loves him, his legacy isn't preserved, but he's delusional and so consumed with arrogance (a form of extreme self-love, if you think about it) that he's unable to see reality.
  • Question 5

"look on my words, ye mighty, and despair! Nothing beside remains..."

 

 

What does this quote suggest about Ozymandias' legacy?

 

Fill in the blank spaces.

 

arrogance

rough

pleasant

unconventional

sad

masculine

instability

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
The contrast between Ozymandias' words, in direct speech form, and the attitudes presented by the poet are incredibly ironic. Ozymandias' words don't match the legacy he's left and the word "nothing" straight after the speech really cements this lack of substance that his words carry.
  • Question 6

"...boundless and bare"

 

Write down the device that Shelley uses in this quote, and its effect. 

 

You should be able to get it down in two sentences.

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Think about the effect of alliteration- usually this device is used to DRAW ATTENTION to the words and create a sense of tone. In this care "boundless" and "bare" really do create a sense of emptiness. The effect of this? Well, it's quite obvious that Ozymandias' legacy is pathetic and empty.
  • Question 7

"king of kings..."

 

 

How does this quote convey Ozymandias' personality

 

Look at;

- the device used

- how this device conveys' Ozymandias' arrogance

 

You get two marks for two sentences

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
The fact that these are Ozymandias' words emphasizes his arrogance and starkly contrasts the scene that Shelley describes- "boundless" and "bare", empty and alone.
  • Question 8

Name one adjective used in the poem which reflects the Ozymandias' cruelty in line 5.

 

CORRECT ANSWER
sneer
cold
EDDIE SAYS
The adjectives "sneer" and "cold" are the two which show Ozymandias as cruel. But, note that Shelley really admires the sculptor for being able to convey this cruelty- in the next line he writes "tell that its sculptor well that those passions read" which seems to be Shelley's way of saying the sculptor did a great job of conveying Ozymandias' true nature! So, yes, Ozymandias' cruelty is conveyed in the statue, but so are the sculptor's artistic talents! Shelley is almost diminishing Ozymandias and making this unknown and anonymous sculptor the true hero, giving him recognition and appreciation for his artwork.
  • Question 9

"the lone and level sands stretch far away"

 

 

Evaluate the use of the words "lone" and "far".

 

  1. What kind of word classification is used?
  2. What effect does this word have?

 

You get two marks for two sentences. 

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Both words really convey the loneliness and bareness of the desert in which the statue is located. They link with the beginning of the poem, where Shelley writes that he met a traveller from an "antique" land- this idea of distance and time are really evocative in the poem, and the two ideas connect quite well. Ozymandias comes from a different and distant era to one that we recognise and we are so removed from him!
  • Question 10

"the hand that mocked them..."

 

 Evaluate Shelley's use of the word "mocked" 

 

Again, remember to identify what type of word classification the word is.

 

What does this word suggest about Ozymandias' personality?

 

You get two marks for two sentences

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Not only was Ozymandias probably cruel and mocking, but we can also look at this quote as, perhaps, a reflection of Ozymandias' subjects mocking him too. Think about the way Ozymandias' legacy has been preserved- it's not been preserved at all so, who's mocking whom? Look at the irony in the poem, too. Ozymandias' words contrast so heavily with the way that his broken and shattered statue are presented to the reader, it's hard not to view him in a mocking light. We aren't meant to have much sympathy for such a cruel man! Ozymandias is presented as so distanced from reality that we can't help but feel that he's being made fun of.
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