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Writing to Describe: A Beach

In this worksheet, students plan and write a description of a beach.

'Writing to Describe: A Beach' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 4

Curriculum topic:  Writing

Curriculum subtopic:  Write Accurately, Fluently and Effectively

Difficulty level:  

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Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

This worksheet is designed to help prepare you for the descriptive writing task you will be asked to do for your GCSE. You will carry out a number of short tasks culminating in an extended piece of writing.
 
You will be asked to produce a piece of writing that describes a beach. Look at these images of beaches to help you:
 

  

 

 

  

Firstly you are going to create a plan for your descriptive writing. When writing descriptively, it is often a good idea to plan around the five senses.

To start off, we are going to work on the sense of sight. Write the heading Sight and list all the things you can imagine seeing on a beach of your choice.
 
Now look over your list and add colours to the things you have imagined seeing. If you can, add similes and alliteration to describe some of the things on the beach. 

For example: 'candy-striped beach huts stood like soldiers on parade surveying the shimmering, soft sand.'

Now add the heading Sound and list all the things you might hear on a beach.


Try to include some onomatopoeic words such as 'crash'. You could also compare the sounds to other things through using similes or metaphors.


For example: 'the crash of the wild waves boomed around the bay.'

Now you are going to focus on the smells, textures and tastes of a beach. You may wish to focus on the feel of the sand and the smells and tastes from a beach bar.

       



Choose three or four things you might find on a beach. For each one, brainstorm as many different words and phrases as you can to describe its smell, taste and texture. You may wish to include some alliteration if you can.

For example: 'the cool coconut tropical-smelling sun cream slops onto my hot skin, instantly cooling and soothing.'

Now it is time to write your description of a beach. You should write at least three paragraphs: one about the sights at the beach, one about the sounds and one about the smells, textures and tastes you might experience at a beach.

You should aim to spend about 20 minutes on this task. You can look at your previous answers at any time by pressing the 'Back' button.
 
When you have finished your parent or guardian will mark your writing using a mark scheme that is similar to the one used in GCSE writing examinations. You will be awarded a mark out of ten.

  • Question 1

Firstly you are going to create a plan for your descriptive writing. When writing descriptively, it is often a good idea to plan around the five senses.

To start off, we are going to work on the sense of sight. Write the heading Sight and list all the things you can imagine seeing on a beach of your choice.
 
Now look over your list and add colours to the things you have imagined seeing. If you can, add similes and alliteration to describe some of the things on the beach. 

For example: 'candy-striped beach huts stood like soldiers on parade surveying the shimmering, soft sand.'

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Check that the student has a list of things they might see on a beach and has used words and phrases to add colours and similes and alliteration to describe some things on the beach.

For example: 'candy-striped beach huts stood like soldiers on parade surveying the shimmering, soft sand.'

  • Question 2

Now add the heading Sound and list all the things you might hear on a beach.


Try to include some onomatopoeic words such as 'crash'. You could also compare the sounds to other things through using similes or metaphors.


For example: 'the crash of the wild waves boomed around the bay.'

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Check that the student has a list of words and phrases to describe what you might hear on a beach. They should have attempted to include some onomatopoeic words such as 'crash'. They may also compare the sounds to other things using similes or metaphors.

For example: 'the crash of the wild waves boomed around the bay.'

  • Question 3

Now you are going to focus on the smells, textures and tastes of a beach. You may wish to focus on the feel of the sand and the smells and tastes from a beach bar.

       



Choose three or four things you might find on a beach. For each one, brainstorm as many different words and phrases as you can to describe its smell, taste and texture. You may wish to include some alliteration if you can.

For example: 'the cool coconut tropical-smelling sun cream slops onto my hot skin, instantly cooling and soothing.'

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Check that the student has chosen three or four things you might find on a beach and for each one has brainstormed different words and phrases to describe the smell, taste and texture. They should include some alliteration if they can.

For example: 'the cool coconut tropical-smelling sun-cream slops onto my hot skin, instantly cooling and soothing.'

  • Question 4

Now it is time to write your description of a beach. You should write at least three paragraphs: one about the sights at the beach, one about the sounds and one about the smells, textures and tastes you might experience at a beach.

You should aim to spend about 20 minutes on this task. You can look at your previous answers at any time by pressing the 'Back' button.
 
When you have finished your parent or guardian will mark your writing using a mark scheme that is similar to the one used in GCSE writing examinations. You will be awarded a mark out of ten.

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Read the student's work and then mark it according to this GCSE style mark scheme. Use a 'best fit' approach.

9 – 10 Marks:

• The student communicates ideas effectively and engages the reader with detailed description.

• The student uses a range of linguistic features such as metaphors, similes and alliteration to make their writing interesting.

• The student uses ambitious vocabulary and spells complex words correctly.

• Paragraphs are used correctly and the student uses a range of different types of sentences with varied punctuation.

5 – 8 Marks:

• The student communicates their ideas and uses some detailed description.

• The student uses some linguistic features such as metaphors, similes and alliteration to make their writing interesting.

• The student attempts to use some ambitious vocabulary and spells some complex words accurately.

• There is an attempt at correct use of paragraphs and sentences are mainly punctuated correctly with an attempt at varied punctuation.

1-4 Marks:

• There is limited communication of ideas and little description.

• The student uses very few linguistic features such as metaphors, similes and alliteration to make their writing interesting.

• There is limited vocabulary and few complex words are spelt accurately.

• There are no paragraphs and punctuation is often incorrect.

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