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GCSE Non-Fiction Reading Skills (2013/Level 2): Food

In this worksheet, students practise their reading and writing skills for the 2013 GCSE.

'GCSE Non-Fiction Reading Skills (2013/Level 2): Food' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 4

Curriculum topic:  GCSE Practice Papers

Curriculum subtopic:  Reading: Non-Fiction

Difficulty level:  

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Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

This paper will test your reading and writing. It is a good idea to print out the source materials from the PDF files to have in front of you to read and annotate.

 

Source 1: Food Farce as World’s Resources Frittered Away!

Source 2: Garden of Worcestershire

Source 3: School Dinners

 

Answer all questions and give yourself a time limit of two hours - one for Section A and one for Section B. Set an alarm! You must refer to the reading sources provided. You must not use a dictionary.

  • The marks for questions are shown in brackets.
  • The maximum mark for this paper is 80.
  • You are reminded of the need for good English and clear presentation in your answers. 
  • Before you start writing, read through all of the questions you have to answer and the reading sources.
  • You are advised to spend two hours on this paper.

 

Good luck!

Section A: Reading

Answer all questions in this section.

You are advised to spend about one hour on this section.

 

 

 

Read Source 1, the online article "Food Farce as World's Resources Frittered Away!", and answer the question:

 

1. What do you understand about the reasons for and issues surrounding food waste? [8 marks]

Now read Source 2, a leaflet advertising Garden of Worcestershire.

 

2. Explain how the company name and images are effective and how they link to the text. [8 marks]

Now read Source 3, "School Dinners", and answer the question:

  

3. Explain some of the thoughts and feelings Georgia Hitchin has about her experience of school dinners. [8 marks]

Now you need to refer to Source 3, "School Dinners", and Source 1, "Food Farce as World’s Resources Frittered Away!".

 

4. Compare the ways in which language is used for effect in the two texts. Give some examples and analyse the effects. [16 marks]

Section B: Writing 

Answer both questions in this section.

You are advised to spend about one hour on this section. 

You are advised to spend about 25 minutes on question 5.

You are advised to spend about 35 minutes on question 6.

 

 

 

5. The food section of your local newspaper is inviting readers to write about their favourite and/or worst foods.

 

Write a letter to the editor describing a favourite/worst food and explaining why you like it/don’t like it. [16 marks]

6. A recent report states: "Food waste is the greatest threat to modern society."

 

Write an article for your school or college newspaper persuading young people to do more and encourage their families to not waste food. [24 marks]

  • Question 1

Section A: Reading

Answer all questions in this section.

You are advised to spend about one hour on this section.

 

 

 

Read Source 1, the online article "Food Farce as World's Resources Frittered Away!", and answer the question:

 

1. What do you understand about the reasons for and issues surrounding food waste? [8 marks]

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Give up to 8 marks for any of the following:

Reasons:
• poor farming practices
• poor engineering
• poor storage facilities
• People buy too much food.
• 'Buy one get one free' encourages people to buy more than they need.
• Food goes off too quickly according to sell-by dates.
• People want perfect fruit and vegetables so lots isn’t harvested.

Issues:
• People are starving in parts of the world.
• The world’s population is increasing.
• We are creating food mountains.
  • Question 2

Now read Source 2, a leaflet advertising Garden of Worcestershire.

 

2. Explain how the company name and images are effective and how they link to the text. [8 marks]

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Award a mark for any of the following points and a mark for each time a quotation is used as evidence. Award any other good ideas. Up to 8 marks.
Company name: ‘Garden of Worcestershire’
• Suggests you are getting a home-grown product rather than mass-produced vegetables.
• Suggests they are regularly picked and fresh.
• Tells you where the vegetables come from so they are local and fresh.

Images:
• Show a range of vegetables showing you will get lots of seasonal vegetables with no plastic wrapping, suggesting the naturalness and organic nature of what you're buying.
• Image of rolling countryside links with the name and shows the vegetables are natural and local and therefore healthier.
  • Question 3

Now read Source 3, "School Dinners", and answer the question:

  

3. Explain some of the thoughts and feelings Georgia Hitchin has about her experience of school dinners. [8 marks]

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Award a mark for any of the following points and a mark for each time a quotation is used as evidence. Up to 8 marks.
• She really wanted a packed lunch but wasn’t allowed because she got free school dinners.
• She has fond memories of her school dinners. She remembers hearing and smelling the dinners being prepared and they always looked appetising when she queued up.
• The dinners were delicious.
• She was envious of the packed lunch boxes.
• She was really envious of the chocolate biscuits and the wrappers in the packed lunch.
• She wanted the shiny wrappers to play with and the crisp packets to pop but all she got was a dirty tray!
  • Question 4

Now you need to refer to Source 3, "School Dinners", and Source 1, "Food Farce as World’s Resources Frittered Away!".

 

4. Compare the ways in which language is used for effect in the two texts. Give some examples and analyse the effects. [16 marks]

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Award a mark for any of the following points, a mark for an explanation, a mark for a comparison with the other text and a mark for each time a quotation is used as evidence. Up to 16 marks.

Source 1:
• alliteration
• emotive language
• quotations from experts and shoppers
• facts
• rhetorical questions
• short sentences
• repetition
• list of three
• written in first person
• use of personal pronouns – you, we

Source 3:
• Paragraph 1: repetition, simile
• Paragraph 2: use of the five senses – sounds and smells, lists of foods, adjectives to describe the foods, alliteration
• Paragraph 3: adjectives, alliteration, lists, metaphor – packed lunch as treasure
  • Question 5

Section B: Writing 

Answer both questions in this section.

You are advised to spend about one hour on this section. 

You are advised to spend about 25 minutes on question 5.

You are advised to spend about 35 minutes on question 6.

 

 

 

5. The food section of your local newspaper is inviting readers to write about their favourite and/or worst foods.

 

Write a letter to the editor describing a favourite/worst food and explaining why you like it/don’t like it. [16 marks]

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
12–16 marks:
• The student communicates ideas effectively and engages the reader with detailed description.
• The student uses a range of linguistic features such as metaphors, similes and alliteration to make their writing interesting.
• The student uses ambitious vocabulary and spells complex words correctly.
• Paragraphs are used correctly and they use a range of different types of sentences with varied punctuation.

5–11 marks:
• The student communicates their ideas and uses some detailed description.
• The student uses some linguistic features such as metaphors, similes and alliteration to make their writing interesting.
• The student attempts to use some ambitious vocabulary and spells some complex words accurately.
• There is an attempt at correct paragraphing and sentences are mainly punctuated correctly with an attempt at varied punctuation.

1–4 marks:
• There is limited communication of ideas and little description.
• The student uses very few linguistic features such as metaphors, similes and alliteration to make their writing interesting.
• There is limited vocabulary and few complex words are spelt accurately.
• There are no paragraphs and punctuation is often incorrect.
  • Question 6

6. A recent report states: "Food waste is the greatest threat to modern society."

 

Write an article for your school or college newspaper persuading young people to do more and encourage their families to not waste food. [24 marks]

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
16–24 marks:
• The student communicates ideas effectively and engages the reader with detailed complex ideas.
• Style and content is matched to audience and purpose.
• The student uses a range of linguistic features such as rhetorical questions, irony, and exaggeration to engage the reader.
• The student uses ambitious vocabulary and spells complex words correctly.
• Paragraphs are used correctly and they use a range of different types of sentences with varied punctuation.
• Student uses complex grammar.
• Connectives are used fluently.

7–15 marks:
• The student successfully communicates and uses some detailed ideas.
• The student clearly identifies audience and purpose.
• The student uses some linguistic features such as rhetorical questions to engage the reader.
• The student attempts to use some ambitious vocabulary and spells some complex words accurately.
• There is an attempt at correct paragraphing and sentences are mainly punctuated correctly with an attempt at varied punctuation. Connectives are used but sometimes mechanically.

1–6 marks:
• There is limited communication of ideas and little detail – one or two ideas are linked.
• There is little awareness of audience and purpose.
• The student uses very few linguistic features such as rhetorical questions to engage the reader.
• There is limited vocabulary and few complex words are spelt accurately.
• There are no paragraphs and punctuation is often incorrect.
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