The smart way to improve grades

Comprehensive & curriculum aligned

Affordable pricing from £10/month

GCSE Non-Fiction Reading Skills (2013/Level 1): Food

In this worksheet, students practise their reading skills for the 2013 GCSE.

'GCSE Non-Fiction Reading Skills (2013/Level 1): Food' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 4

Curriculum topic:  GCSE Practice Papers

Curriculum subtopic:  Reading: Non-Fiction

Difficulty level:  

down

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

This paper will test your reading. It is a good idea to print out the source materials from the PDF files to have in front of you to read and annotate.

 

The Source Materials:

Food Farce as World’s Resources Frittered Away!

School Dinners

 

Answer all questions and give yourself a time limit of one hour. Set an alarm! You must refer to the reading sources provided. You must not use a dictionary.

  • The marks for questions are shown in brackets.
  • The maximum mark for this paper is 40.
  • You are reminded of the need for good English and clear presentation in your answers. 
  • Before you start writing, read through all of the questions you have to answer and the reading sources.
  • You are advised to spend one hour on this paper.

 

Good luck!

Answer all of the following questions.

The separate Source Materials are a newspaper article: "Food Farce as World’s Resources Frittered Away", and an extract from an autobiography by Georgia Hitchin: School Dinners.

 

 

Look at the newspaper article, Food Farce as World’s Resources Frittered Away.

 

1. According to the writer, why is so much food being wasted? [10 marks]

2. Why is the writer concerned about the situation? [10 marks]

You must use evidence from the text to support your answer.

Now look at the autobiographical extract, School Dinners.

 

3. What are the writer’s memories of school dinners and why did she want a packed lunch so much? [10 marks]

You must use evidence from the text to support your answer.

To answer the next question you will need to refer to both texts.

 

4. The article identifies the issue of global food waste. The autobiography is a childhood memory of food.

What are both writers saying about the importance of food and issues surrounding it? [10 marks]

You must make it clear which text you are taking your information from.

  • Question 1

Answer all of the following questions.

The separate Source Materials are a newspaper article: "Food Farce as World’s Resources Frittered Away", and an extract from an autobiography by Georgia Hitchin: School Dinners.

 

 

Look at the newspaper article, Food Farce as World’s Resources Frittered Away.

 

1. According to the writer, why is so much food being wasted? [10 marks]

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Award a mark for any of the following points and a mark for each time a quotation is used as evidence. Up to 10 marks.
• poor farming practices
• poor engineering
• poor storage facilities
• People buy too much food.
• 'Buy one get one free' encourages people to buy more than they need.
• Food goes off too quickly according to sell-by dates.
• People want perfect fruit and vegetables so lots isn’t harvested.
  • Question 2

2. Why is the writer concerned about the situation? [10 marks]

You must use evidence from the text to support your answer.

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Award a mark for any of the following points and a mark for each time a quotation is used as evidence. Up to 10 marks.
• Almost half the world's food is thrown away.
• 2 billion tonnes is wasted.
• People are starving in parts of the world.
• The world's population is increasing.
• We are creating food mountains.
  • Question 3

Now look at the autobiographical extract, School Dinners.

 

3. What are the writer’s memories of school dinners and why did she want a packed lunch so much? [10 marks]

You must use evidence from the text to support your answer.

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Award a mark for any of the following points and a mark for each time a quotation is used as evidence. Up to 10 marks.
• They were tasty.
• They were healthy and weren't processed foods.
• They were cooked from scratch and were fresh.
• Local ingredients were used.
• The same people cooked them every day.
• They smelled nice as they were being cooked.
• The food looked and smelled appetising as they queued up.
• They had lots of variety of foods.
• She wanted a cool lunch box.
• She wanted chocolate biscuits.
• She longed for crisps.
• She wanted the wrappers.
  • Question 4

To answer the next question you will need to refer to both texts.

 

4. The article identifies the issue of global food waste. The autobiography is a childhood memory of food.

What are both writers saying about the importance of food and issues surrounding it? [10 marks]

You must make it clear which text you are taking your information from.

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Award a mark for any of the following points and a mark for each time a quotation is used as evidence. Up to 10 marks.

Article:
• Half the world's food is thrown away which is a problem with a growing population and people starving in the world.
• We are creating food mountains.
• We are wasting food due to: poor farming practices, poor engineering, poor storage facilities, people buying too much food.
• 'Buy one get one free' encourages people to buy more than they need.
• Food goes off too quickly according to sell-by dates.
• People want perfect fruit and vegetables so lots isn't harvested.

Autobiography:
• School dinners used to be better – tasty, fresh and healthy.
• Food is important to children.
• Often when you are younger the wrappers of food are more important than the food itself.
• Other people's lunches always seemed more appealing.
Preview ---- OR ----

Sign up for a £1 trial so you can track and measure your child's progress on this activity.

What is EdPlace?

We're your National Curriculum aligned online education content provider helping each child succeed in English, maths and science from year 1 to GCSE. With an EdPlace account you’ll be able to track and measure progress, helping each child achieve their best. We build confidence and attainment by personalising each child’s learning at a level that suits them.

Start your £1 trial

Start your trial for £1