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Exam Preparation for Non-Fiction Texts 3

In this worksheet, students revise some of the key terminology needed for non-fiction texts in their GCSE exam.

'Exam Preparation for Non-Fiction Texts 3' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 4

Curriculum topic:  Reading

Curriculum subtopic:  Awareness of Vocabulary, Form and Grammatical Features

Difficulty level:  

down

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

This worksheet contains a series of quick questions designed to help you revise some of the key terminology needed for the GCSE reading paper.

Sometimes, writers use questions that don't require an answer for a particular effect.

 

Here is an example:

'Over the last year the local museum has increased its entrance fees by 30%. It now costs the average family £18 to visit their local museum. In a time when people are struggling financially is it right to deny families the opportunity to learn about their local area?'

 

 

What is this kind of question called and why is it used? Select two answers.

a repeatable question

to make the reader find out the answer themselves

to make the reader think

a rhetorical question

Another way of making readers feel involved is through the use of personal pronouns or modes of address.

 

Match the following personal pronouns or modes of address with their effects. Hover your mouse over the boxes to see their contents in full.

 

1. I cannot believe that in this day and age...

2. You are an educated audience, you know it makes sense...

3. We must work together on this to ensure the right thing is done...

4. So my friends, it is clear that...

Column A

Column B

sentence 1
This gives a friendly tone and breaks down the bar...
sentence 2
The use of the first person gives a personal feel ...
sentence 3
The use of the second person involves the readers ...
sentence 4
This assumes the reader is on the side of the writ...

Writers also use imagery to paint a picture in their readers' minds to help them understand something more clearly. For example:

 

The sun shone like a burning fire suspended in a blue nothingness.

 

Which of the terms below are examples of imagery?

alliteration

metaphor

repetition

simile

An effective way of emphasising a point is to use the rule of three. For example:

 

Allowing families cheap or free entry to local museums increases knowledge, a desire to learn and a sense of community.

 

Which three words or phrases are used in the rule of three in this example?

free entry

knowledge

families

desire to learn

sense of community

local

Emotive language is used to create strong emotions in the reader such as anger or guilt. Which words in the statement below are examples of emotive language?

 

Every year thousands of helpless, defenceless puppies are cruelly dumped by their heartless owners.

cruelly

puppies

dumped

defenceless

helpless

thousands

heartless

Read this headline:

 

Many museum prices soar in massive money cut!

 

Which technique is being used here? What is its effect? Select two answers.

the group of words stand out

the sentence flow

alliteration

assonance

Exaggeration is another technique that can be used to give emphasis to something. Writers often use exaggeration. The easiest way to do this is to use superlatives.

 

Read the list of words below and select the four examples of superlatives.

smartest

great

small

newest

cleverest

best

Why is repetition used in persuasive writing?

to emphasise a point

to make sure the reader stays interested

to make the paragraph seem longer

Now we are going to revise the different persuasive devices.

Match each device below with its effect. Hover your mouse over the effects to see them in full.

 

If you are having difficulty, it might be helpful to write your own examples of each technique.

Column A

Column B

alliteration
to manipulate a readers emotions or to be dramatic
exaggeration or hyperbole
to emphasise a point
rule of three
to involve the reader and make them think
personal pronouns
to make a group of words stand out
rhetorical questions
to give something greater emphasis
repetition
to involve the reader or give the writing a sense ...
imagery
to paint a picture in the mind of the reader
emotive language
to emphasise a point

Writers of persuasive writing often want to get their readers or listeners on side. For example:

 

You're intelligent listeners, you understand how ridiculous this is...

 

What do we call this technique?

flattery

placating

Read the following passage and select the techniques used from the list below.

 

'Short-sighted, selfish councillors are taking away the opportunity for struggling families to visit their local museum. In a time of financial hardship their money-grabbing ways is denying children a sense of community, a chance to gain knowledge, and to develop an understanding of their local area. You are intelligent readers, does this make sense to you?'

sibilance

metaphors

emotive language

list of three

rhetorical question

repetition

flattery

similes

What technique is being used here:

 

Museums are important. As Shirley Manley, head of educational resources argues, "access to museums is vital for our young people..."

repetition

expert opinion

argument

  • Question 1

Sometimes, writers use questions that don't require an answer for a particular effect.

 

Here is an example:

'Over the last year the local museum has increased its entrance fees by 30%. It now costs the average family £18 to visit their local museum. In a time when people are struggling financially is it right to deny families the opportunity to learn about their local area?'

 

 

What is this kind of question called and why is it used? Select two answers.

CORRECT ANSWER
to make the reader think
a rhetorical question
EDDIE SAYS
This is a rhetorical question designed to make the reader think and become involved.
  • Question 2

Another way of making readers feel involved is through the use of personal pronouns or modes of address.

 

Match the following personal pronouns or modes of address with their effects. Hover your mouse over the boxes to see their contents in full.

 

1. I cannot believe that in this day and age...

2. You are an educated audience, you know it makes sense...

3. We must work together on this to ensure the right thing is done...

4. So my friends, it is clear that...

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

sentence 1
The use of the first person gives...
sentence 2
The use of the second person invo...
sentence 3
This assumes the reader is on the...
sentence 4
This gives a friendly tone and br...
EDDIE SAYS
I cannot believe that in this day and age... = The use of first person gives a personal feel to the writing and a sense of authority.
You are an educated audience, you know it makes sense... = The use of the second person involves the readers and makes them feel as if they are being spoken to directly.
We must work together on this to ensure the right thing is done... = This assumes the reader is on the side of the writer.
So my friends, it is clear that... = This gives a friendly tone and breaks down the barrier between the reader and writer.
  • Question 3

Writers also use imagery to paint a picture in their readers' minds to help them understand something more clearly. For example:

 

The sun shone like a burning fire suspended in a blue nothingness.

 

Which of the terms below are examples of imagery?

CORRECT ANSWER
metaphor
simile
EDDIE SAYS
Metaphor and simile are examples of imagery.
  • Question 4

An effective way of emphasising a point is to use the rule of three. For example:

 

Allowing families cheap or free entry to local museums increases knowledge, a desire to learn and a sense of community.

 

Which three words or phrases are used in the rule of three in this example?

CORRECT ANSWER
knowledge
desire to learn
sense of community
EDDIE SAYS
The words or phrases used in the list of three are:
knowledge, desire to learn, sense of community.
  • Question 5

Emotive language is used to create strong emotions in the reader such as anger or guilt. Which words in the statement below are examples of emotive language?

 

Every year thousands of helpless, defenceless puppies are cruelly dumped by their heartless owners.

CORRECT ANSWER
cruelly
dumped
defenceless
helpless
heartless
EDDIE SAYS
The emotive words are:
helpless, defenceless, heartless, dumped and cruelly.
  • Question 6

Read this headline:

 

Many museum prices soar in massive money cut!

 

Which technique is being used here? What is its effect? Select two answers.

CORRECT ANSWER
the group of words stand out
alliteration
EDDIE SAYS
The headline uses alliteration which makes the group of words stand out.
  • Question 7

Exaggeration is another technique that can be used to give emphasis to something. Writers often use exaggeration. The easiest way to do this is to use superlatives.

 

Read the list of words below and select the four examples of superlatives.

CORRECT ANSWER
smartest
newest
cleverest
best
EDDIE SAYS
A superlative is defined as something 'of the highest degree'. The superlatives in the list are:
newest, smartest, cleverest and best.
  • Question 8

Why is repetition used in persuasive writing?

CORRECT ANSWER
to emphasise a point
EDDIE SAYS
Repetition is used to emphasise a point.
  • Question 9

Now we are going to revise the different persuasive devices.

Match each device below with its effect. Hover your mouse over the effects to see them in full.

 

If you are having difficulty, it might be helpful to write your own examples of each technique.

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

alliteration
to make a group of words stand ou...
exaggeration or hyperbole
to give something greater emphasi...
rule of three
to emphasise a point
personal pronouns
to involve the reader or give the...
rhetorical questions
to involve the reader and make th...
repetition
to emphasise a point
imagery
to paint a picture in the mind of...
emotive language
to manipulate a readers emotions ...
EDDIE SAYS
Alliteration = to make a group of words stand out.
Exaggeration or hyperbole = to give something greater emphasis.
Rule of three = to emphasise a point.
Personal pronouns = to involve the reader or give the writing a sense of authority.
Rhetorical questions = to involve the reader and make them think.
Repetition = to emphasise a point.
Imagery = to paint a picture in the mind of the reader.
Emotive language = to manipulate a readers emotions or to be dramatic.
  • Question 10

Writers of persuasive writing often want to get their readers or listeners on side. For example:

 

You're intelligent listeners, you understand how ridiculous this is...

 

What do we call this technique?

CORRECT ANSWER
flattery
EDDIE SAYS
Trying to get their readers or listeners on side is called flattery.
  • Question 11

Read the following passage and select the techniques used from the list below.

 

'Short-sighted, selfish councillors are taking away the opportunity for struggling families to visit their local museum. In a time of financial hardship their money-grabbing ways is denying children a sense of community, a chance to gain knowledge, and to develop an understanding of their local area. You are intelligent readers, does this make sense to you?'

CORRECT ANSWER
sibilance
emotive language
list of three
rhetorical question
flattery
EDDIE SAYS
The techniques used in this paragraph are:
Short-sighted, selfish councillors... = sibilance.
Short-sighted, selfish, money-grabbing, struggling... = emotive language.
In a time of financial hardship their money-grabbing ways is denying children a sense of community, a chance to gain knowledge, and to develop an understanding of their local area = list of three.
You are intelligent readers, does this make sense to you? = flattery and rhetorical questions.
  • Question 12

What technique is being used here:

 

Museums are important. As Shirley Manley, head of educational resources argues, "access to museums is vital for our young people..."

CORRECT ANSWER
expert opinion
EDDIE SAYS
This extract uses an expert opinion.
---- OR ----

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