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English GCSE

In this assessment, students will review their comprehension of various topics across key stage 4. May take approximately 45 minutes to complete.

'English GCSE ' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 4

Curriculum topic:  End of Key Stage Assessments

Curriculum subtopic:  Starter Assessments

Difficulty level:  

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Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

In this assessment, you'll review your understanding of various topics across key stage 4. May take approximately 45 minutes to complete but take all the time you need.

You must answer the assessment questions based on the following 4 extracts. To read the extract again click on the Help button in the questions.

 

Extract 1

Extract from Hard Times by Charles Dickens.


Mr Gradgrind's Speech:


'NOW, what I want is, Facts. Teach these boys and girls nothing but Facts. Facts alone are wanted in life. Plant nothing else, and root out everything else. You can only form the minds of reasoning animals upon Facts: nothing else will ever be of any service to them. This is the principle on which I bring up my own children, and this is the principle on which I bring up these children. Stick to Facts, sir!'

  ...The emphasis was helped by the speaker's square wall of a forehead, which had his eyebrows for its base, while his eyes found commodious cellarage in two dark caves, overshadowed by the wall. The emphasis was helped by the speaker's mouth, which was wide, thin, and hard set. The emphasis was helped by the speaker's voice, which was inflexible, dry, and dictatorial. ... The speaker's obstinate carriage, square coat, square legs, square shoulders, - nay, his very neckcloth, trained to take him by the throat with an unaccommodating grasp, like a stubborn fact, as it was, - all helped the emphasis.cellarage in two dark caves, overshadowed by the wall. The emphasis was helped by the speaker's mouth, which was wide, thin, and hard set. The emphasis was helped by the speaker's voice, which was inflexible, dry, and dictatorial. ... The speaker's obstinate carriage, square coat, square legs, square shoulders, - nay, his very neckcloth, trained to take him by the throat with an unaccommodating grasp, like a stubborn fact, as it was, - all helped the emphasis.
'In this life, we want nothing but Facts, sir; nothing but Facts!
'

****************

 

Extract 2

 

Extract from Sherlock Holmes: The Hound of the Baskervilles, by Arthur Conan Doyle:

 

We had left the fertile country behind and beneath us. We looked
back on it now, the slanting rays of a low sun turning the
streams to threads of gold and glowing on the red earth new
turned by the plough and the broad tangle of the woodlands. The
road in front of us grew bleaker and wilder over huge russet and
olive slopes, sprinkled with giant boulders. Now and then we
passed a moorland cottage, walled and roofed with stone, with no
creeper to break its harsh outline. Suddenly we looked down into
a cup-like depression, patched with stunted oaks and firs which
had been twisted and bent by the fury of years of storm. Two
high, narrow towers rose over the trees. The driver pointed with
his whip.

"Baskerville Hall," said he.

 

****************

 

Extract 3

The opening to a short story published in 1843 by an American writer, Edgar Allan Poe. The Tell-Tale Heart is a story in which the narrator tries to convince the reader of his sanity whilst describing a murder he has committed.

 



'The Tell-Tale Heart'



TRUE! nervous, very, very dreadfully nervous I had been and am; but why WILL you say that I am mad? The disease had sharpened my senses, not destroyed, not dulled them. Above all was the sense of hearing acute. I heard all things in the heaven and in the earth. I heard many things in hell. How then am I mad? Hearken! and observe how healthily, how calmly, I can tell you the whole story.

It is impossible to say how first the idea entered my brain, but, once conceived, it haunted me day and night. Object there was none. Passion there was none. I loved the old man. He had never wronged me. He had never given me insult. For his gold I had no desire. I think it was his eye! Yes, it was this! One of his eyes resembled that of a vulture -- a pale blue eye with a film over it. Whenever it fell upon me my blood ran cold, and so by degrees, very gradually, I made up my mind to take the life of the old man, and thus rid myself of the eye for ever.

Now this is the point. You fancy me mad. Madmen know nothing. But you should have seen me. You should have seen how wisely I proceeded -- with what caution -- with what foresight, with what dissimulation, I went to work! I was never kinder to the old man than during the whole week before I killed him. And every night about midnight I turned the latch of his door and opened it oh, so gently! And then, when I had made an opening sufficient for my head, I put in a dark lantern all closed, closed so that no light shone out, and then I thrust in my head. Oh, you would have laughed to see how cunningly I thrust it in! I moved it slowly, very, very slowly, so that I might not disturb the old man's sleep. It took me an hour to place my whole head within the opening so far that I could see him as he lay upon his bed. Ha! would a madman have been so wise as this? And then when my head was well in the room I undid the lantern cautiously -- oh, so cautiously -- cautiously (for the hinges creaked), I undid it just so much that a single thin ray fell upon the vulture eye. And this I did for seven long nights, every night just at midnight, but I found the eye always closed, and so it was impossible to do the work, for it was not the old man who vexed me but his Evil Eye. And every morning, when the day broke, I went boldly into the chamber and spoke courageously to him, calling him by name in a hearty tone, and inquiring how he had passed the night. So you see he would have been a very profound old man, indeed, to suspect that every night, just at twelve, I looked in upon him while he slept.

 

****************

 

Extract 4

 

Description of "Coketown" from the book Hard Times by Charles Dickens:

 

It was a town of red brick, or of brick that would have been red if the smoke and ashes had allowed it; but as matters stood, it was a town of unnatural red and black like the painted face of a savage.

It was a town of machinery and tall chimneys, out of which interminable serpents of smoke trailed themselves for ever and ever, and never got uncoiled.

It had a black canal in it, and a river that ran purple with ill-smelling dye, and vast piles of building full of windows where there was a rattling and a trembling all day long, and where the piston of the steam-engine worked monotonously up and down, like the head of an elephant in a state of melancholy madness. It contained several large streets all very like one another, and many small streets still more like one another, inhabited by people equally like one another, who all went in and out at the same hours, with the same sound upon the same pavements, to do the same work, and to whom every day was the same as yesterday and tomorrow, and every year the counterpart of the last and the next.

 

 

Which shape does Dickens describe Mr Gradgrind as?

Rectangle

Circle

Triangle

Square

Which of the following school subjects would Mr Gradgrind think were the BEST ones to do? Tick three boxes.

Maths

Dance

Drama

Science

French

Art

Read this student's work and choose the best explanation for their sentence:

 

Dickens introduces the idea that Mr Gradgrind is threatening: "root out everything else" suggests that  ________________________.

only facts should be "planted".

children should only learn certain things.

he might tell them that everything else they think is wrong, apart from "facts".

A good technique when writing essays is to pick out a single word from a longer quotation and explain it further.

 

The writer creates the atmosphere of an increasingly barren scene: "The road in front of us grew bleaker and wilder". The word ___________ here suggests that there is little growing, and few people living here.

 

Write the missing word in the answer box below.

Again, write the missing word from the sentence below in the answer box:

 

The writer creates the atmosphere of an increasingly barren scene: "The road in front of us grew bleaker and wilder". The word ___________ here suggests that there is an element of threat or danger, that anything could happen to the travellers.

When the driver points with his whip, it adds to the tense, foreboding atmosphere as he seems to wish to distance himself from the place himself. The word "___________" also has connotations of threat or even violence.

driver

pointed

whip

How is the tale narrated and what is the effect of this narrative style? Choose two correct answers.

in the first person

in the second person

in the third person

This creates a flawed narration where the reader is constantly forced to question what they are reading.

This creates an omniscient narration where the reader can take at face value everything they are told.

Reread the opening line:

 

 

TRUE! nervous, very, very dreadfully nervous I had been and am; but why WILL you say that I am mad?

 

Which words are repeated and what is the effect of this repetition? Select three correct answers from the options below.

'True'

'very'

'nervous'

'mad'

This shows that the state of mind of the narrator is nervous and that we should question what he tells us.

This shows that the state of mind of the narrator is calm and that we can trust what he tells us.

What is the effect of the rhetorical question in the opening paragraph?

It makes the reader trust the narrator.

It makes the reader feel important.

It makes the reader become involved in the narrative and question the sanity of the narrator.

Read the final line of the opening paragraph again.

 

Hearken! and observe how healthily, how calmly, I can tell you the whole story.

 

Which word contrasts with the tone of the rest of the paragraph? What does this tell us about the narrator? Choose two correct answers.

'Hearken'

'calmly'

This word suggests that really the narrator is not mad and that we should trust what he tells us.

This word suggests that the narrator is trying to appear sane when really he isn't, so we shouldn't trust what he says.

Read the second paragraph again. What is the main effect of the short sentences?

They make the narrator seem in control.

They emphasise the nervousness of the narrator.

They make the story develop quickly.

Now read the final paragraph again. 

 

In this paragraph the writer creates tension. How does he do this in the first few sentences?

He uses long sentences.

He uses short sentences.

He uses repetition.

Coketown was invented by Dickens, the writer, but he based it on the northern mill towns such as Preston, Manchester and Bradford, as they were in Victorian times. Which colours does Dickens use to describe the town? Tick three boxes.

Blue

Red

Black

Green

Purple

What do the colours used tell us about the town they describe?

It must be night-time because it is very dark.

The colours describe a winter scene.

It is unnatural, things are not the colour they should be.

The writer uses two images of animals in his description:

"interminable serpents of smoke trailed themselves for ever and ever, and never got uncoiled."

...and...

"the piston of the steam-engine worked monotonously up and down, like the head of an elephant in a state of melancholy madness."

 

Which of the following points would be the best one to make about these quotations?

Nature is not allowed to do what it should, everything is confined by the work of the town.

The work is boring and repetitive.

Working hard will drive you mad.

What point do you think Dickens is making about how society was organised in Victorian times, through his description in this extract?

That people were lucky to have a job in a factory.

That people should move into towns to look for work.

That life was hard for poor people and they had a poor quality of life.

Read this student's work and write the missing word in the text box beneath:

 

It was important for Dickens to describe what life was like in the Northern mill towns. Many of his readers would be part of the middle class, which was growing in V__________ England. However, they would not have any contact with really poor people as they lived very separate lives. 

Choose which of the experiences given below belong to the Victorian middle class, and which are the experience of the Victorian poor.

 Middle class Poor people
greater range of food
chance of work in factories
chance to be a manager in the factories
leisure time to read books
dirty and physical work
more luxury items to buy
little or no choice about where you lived
forced to work long hours for basic pay

Choose the correct spelling of the following word.

neice

niece

Choose the correct spelling of the following word.

ceiling

cieling

Choose the correct spelling of the following word.

neighbour

nieghbour

Choose the correct spelling of the following word.

seize

sieze

Choose the correct spelling of the following word.

weird

wierd

Choose the correct spelling of the following word.

acheive

achieve

Choose the correct spelling of the following word.

perceive

percieve

Match these -ious words with their definitions. Look carefully at the spellings as you may need them in later questions!

 

Hover your mouse over the box if you can't read the full definition.

Column A

Column B

atrocious
having high status, inspiring respect
cautious
very valuable
prestigious
extremely comfortable and indulgent
precious
extremely bad or unpleasant
conscientious
wary of potential danger
luxurious
hard working and careful

Match these -eous words with their definitions. Look carefully at the spelling as you may need them in the later questions!

 

Hover your mouse over the box if you can't read the full definition.

Column A

Column B

outrageous
happening at the same time
courageous
done without being planned in advance
gorgeous
shockingly bad or offensive
hideous
extremely ugly
simultaneous
very attractive or beautiful
spontaneous
brave

Complete the missing word in the following sentence.

 

That necklace is very prec______ to me because it belonged to my grandmother.

 

(Write the whole word in the answer box.)

Complete the missing word in the following sentence.

 

Your behaviour this morning was outrag______!

 

(Write the whole word in the answer box.)

Complete the missing word in the following sentence.

 

We had planned to go on a picnic but the weather that day was atroc______ so we stayed at home.

 

(Write the whole word in the answer box.)

Complete the missing word in the following sentence.

 

We stayed in a really luxur______ hotel when we went to Dubai.

 

(Write the whole word in the answer box.)

Complete the missing word in the following sentence.

 

There was a simultan________ broadcast on TV and radio.

 

(Write the whole word in the answer box.)

Correct the punctuation error in the following sentence and rewrite the whole sentence.

 

"What time do you call this" sneered Mr Andrews, as Carly crept into the room.

Correct the punctuation error in the following sentence and rewrite the whole sentence.

 

We took: Billy, Jake and Adil to the match.

Correct the punctuation error in the following sentence and rewrite the whole sentence.

 

My dogs' tail is really long and fluffy.

Correct the punctuation error in the following sentence and rewrite the whole sentence.

 

"I'm never going there again, stated Katie."

Correct the punctuation error in the following sentence and rewrite the whole sentence.

 

My favourite colour is green, my sister prefers blue.

In this sentence brackets have been used in the wrong place. Write out the whole setence again, moving the brackets to the correct place.

 

My great uncle who is (95 years old) is coming to stay with us.

This time, the writer has not put any punctuation in the place marked x, but two punctuation marks are needed. Tick the box that shows the correct punctuation marks.

 

"What on earth do you think you are doingx bellowed Mrs Smith.

;"

"!

"?

?"

."

There are two possible ways of punctuating the places marked in this sentence. Tick the two boxes that show the correct ways.

 

JackxElla's brotherxbought the tickets for us.

brackets

colons

inverted commas

commas

apostrophes

  • Question 1

Which shape does Dickens describe Mr Gradgrind as?

CORRECT ANSWER
Square
EDDIE SAYS
Dickens describes Mr Gradgrind's "The speaker's obstinate carriage, square coat, square legs, square shoulders..."
  • Question 2

Which of the following school subjects would Mr Gradgrind think were the BEST ones to do? Tick three boxes.

CORRECT ANSWER
Maths
Science
French
EDDIE SAYS
My Gradgrind would prefer subjects where students do not have to be creative, but could just learn 'facts'.
  • Question 3

Read this student's work and choose the best explanation for their sentence:

 

Dickens introduces the idea that Mr Gradgrind is threatening: "root out everything else" suggests that  ________________________.

CORRECT ANSWER
he might tell them that everything else they think is wrong, apart from "facts".
EDDIE SAYS
The best explanation here is that Mr Gradgrind would say that everything else is wrong and does not need to be learnt. The only things worth knowing are facts.
  • Question 4

A good technique when writing essays is to pick out a single word from a longer quotation and explain it further.

 

The writer creates the atmosphere of an increasingly barren scene: "The road in front of us grew bleaker and wilder". The word ___________ here suggests that there is little growing, and few people living here.

 

Write the missing word in the answer box below.

CORRECT ANSWER
bleaker
EDDIE SAYS
The word 'bleak', when referring to an area of land, is defined as exposed to the elements and lacking in crops and vegetation. This supports the statement that the scene portrayed by the author is growing more barren and wild as the travellers progress.
  • Question 5

Again, write the missing word from the sentence below in the answer box:

 

The writer creates the atmosphere of an increasingly barren scene: "The road in front of us grew bleaker and wilder". The word ___________ here suggests that there is an element of threat or danger, that anything could happen to the travellers.

CORRECT ANSWER
wilder
EDDIE SAYS
Wilder is the correct word here. The atmosphere created by the author is growing increasingly less familiar for the travellers, so describing the surroundings as 'wild' adds a sense of danger to the scene.
  • Question 6

When the driver points with his whip, it adds to the tense, foreboding atmosphere as he seems to wish to distance himself from the place himself. The word "___________" also has connotations of threat or even violence.

CORRECT ANSWER
whip
EDDIE SAYS
Whips were generally used for flogging an animal, such as a horse pulling a carriage, to urge it onwards. They were also used for beating animals and humans, so they evoke connotations of torture and fear.
  • Question 7

How is the tale narrated and what is the effect of this narrative style? Choose two correct answers.

CORRECT ANSWER
in the first person
This creates a flawed narration where the reader is constantly forced to question what they are reading.
EDDIE SAYS
The story is written in the first person and this creates a flawed narration where the reader is constantly forced to question what they are reading.
  • Question 8

Reread the opening line:

 

 

TRUE! nervous, very, very dreadfully nervous I had been and am; but why WILL you say that I am mad?

 

Which words are repeated and what is the effect of this repetition? Select three correct answers from the options below.

CORRECT ANSWER
'very'
'nervous'
This shows that the state of mind of the narrator is nervous and that we should question what he tells us.
EDDIE SAYS
The words that are repeated are 'nervous' and 'very'. These words show that the state of mind of the narrator is nervous and that we should question what he tells us.
  • Question 9

What is the effect of the rhetorical question in the opening paragraph?

CORRECT ANSWER
It makes the reader become involved in the narrative and question the sanity of the narrator.
EDDIE SAYS
It makes the reader become involved in the narrative and question the sanity of the narrator.
  • Question 10

Read the final line of the opening paragraph again.

 

Hearken! and observe how healthily, how calmly, I can tell you the whole story.

 

Which word contrasts with the tone of the rest of the paragraph? What does this tell us about the narrator? Choose two correct answers.

CORRECT ANSWER
'calmly'
This word suggests that the narrator is trying to appear sane when really he isn't, so we shouldn't trust what he says.
EDDIE SAYS
The word 'calmly' is in direct contrast to the nervous tone of the rest of the paragraph. This word suggests that the narrator is trying to appear sane when really he isn't, so we shouldn't trust what he says.
  • Question 11

Read the second paragraph again. What is the main effect of the short sentences?

CORRECT ANSWER
They emphasise the nervousness of the narrator.
EDDIE SAYS
The writer uses short sentences to emphasise the nervousness of the narrator.
  • Question 12

Now read the final paragraph again. 

 

In this paragraph the writer creates tension. How does he do this in the first few sentences?

CORRECT ANSWER
He uses short sentences.
EDDIE SAYS
The writer creates tension through short sentences.
  • Question 13

Coketown was invented by Dickens, the writer, but he based it on the northern mill towns such as Preston, Manchester and Bradford, as they were in Victorian times. Which colours does Dickens use to describe the town? Tick three boxes.

CORRECT ANSWER
Red
Black
Purple
EDDIE SAYS
The colours used to describe the town are red, black and purple. Black emphasises the amount of smoke and dirt that is present in the town, and it coats all of the buildings in the town.
  • Question 14

What do the colours used tell us about the town they describe?

CORRECT ANSWER
It is unnatural, things are not the colour they should be.
EDDIE SAYS
The bricks should be red, but are black from smoke, the canal should not be black and the river should not be purple; it is a very unnatural scene.
  • Question 15

The writer uses two images of animals in his description:

"interminable serpents of smoke trailed themselves for ever and ever, and never got uncoiled."

...and...

"the piston of the steam-engine worked monotonously up and down, like the head of an elephant in a state of melancholy madness."

 

Which of the following points would be the best one to make about these quotations?

CORRECT ANSWER
Nature is not allowed to do what it should, everything is confined by the work of the town.
EDDIE SAYS
The first answer links both of the quotations together (as they are both about nature) and explains the point which Dickens is making about the unnatural way of life in Coketown.
  • Question 16

What point do you think Dickens is making about how society was organised in Victorian times, through his description in this extract?

CORRECT ANSWER
That life was hard for poor people and they had a poor quality of life.
EDDIE SAYS
Dickens is emphasising the hardship that poor people suffered in Victorian times. He highlights the vast difference in the quality of life between rich people and poor people.
  • Question 17

Read this student's work and write the missing word in the text box beneath:

 

It was important for Dickens to describe what life was like in the Northern mill towns. Many of his readers would be part of the middle class, which was growing in V__________ England. However, they would not have any contact with really poor people as they lived very separate lives. 

CORRECT ANSWER
Victorian
EDDIE SAYS
The missing word is 'Victorian', as Dickens' novel is based in Victorian England and, in the novel, he emphasises the difference between poor people and rich people at this time.
  • Question 18

Choose which of the experiences given below belong to the Victorian middle class, and which are the experience of the Victorian poor.

CORRECT ANSWER
 Middle class Poor people
greater range of food
chance of work in factories
chance to be a manager in the factories
leisure time to read books
dirty and physical work
more luxury items to buy
little or no choice about where you lived
forced to work long hours for basic pay
  • Question 19

Choose the correct spelling of the following word.

CORRECT ANSWER
niece
EDDIE SAYS
'Niece' follows the 'i before e except after c' rule.
  • Question 20

Choose the correct spelling of the following word.

CORRECT ANSWER
ceiling
EDDIE SAYS
'Ceiling' also follows the rule, as the word is spelt 'cei' not 'cie'.
  • Question 21

Choose the correct spelling of the following word.

CORRECT ANSWER
neighbour
EDDIE SAYS
'Neighbour' is an exception to the rule, as the 'e' comes before the 'i', but there is no 'c'.
  • Question 22

Choose the correct spelling of the following word.

CORRECT ANSWER
seize
EDDIE SAYS
'Seize' is another exception to the rule.
  • Question 23

Choose the correct spelling of the following word.

CORRECT ANSWER
weird
EDDIE SAYS
Again, 'weird' does not follow the 'i before e except after c' rule either.
  • Question 24

Choose the correct spelling of the following word.

CORRECT ANSWER
achieve
EDDIE SAYS
'Achieve' follows the 'i before e' rule. Although there is a 'c' before the 'ie', the 'c' does not come directly before these two letters, so the word is spelt 'ie'.
  • Question 25

Choose the correct spelling of the following word.

CORRECT ANSWER
perceive
EDDIE SAYS
'Perceive' follows the rule, as the word is spelt 'cei'.
  • Question 26

Match these -ious words with their definitions. Look carefully at the spellings as you may need them in later questions!

 

Hover your mouse over the box if you can't read the full definition.

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

atrocious
extremely bad or unpleasant
cautious
wary of potential danger
prestigious
having high status, inspiring res...
precious
very valuable
conscientious
hard working and careful
luxurious
extremely comfortable and indulge...
  • Question 27

Match these -eous words with their definitions. Look carefully at the spelling as you may need them in the later questions!

 

Hover your mouse over the box if you can't read the full definition.

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

outrageous
shockingly bad or offensive
courageous
brave
gorgeous
very attractive or beautiful
hideous
extremely ugly
simultaneous
happening at the same time
spontaneous
done without being planned in adv...
  • Question 28

Complete the missing word in the following sentence.

 

That necklace is very prec______ to me because it belonged to my grandmother.

 

(Write the whole word in the answer box.)

CORRECT ANSWER
precious
EDDIE SAYS
'Precious' means having great value.
  • Question 29

Complete the missing word in the following sentence.

 

Your behaviour this morning was outrag______!

 

(Write the whole word in the answer box.)

CORRECT ANSWER
outrageous
EDDIE SAYS
'Outrageous' means shockingly bad or offensive.
  • Question 30

Complete the missing word in the following sentence.

 

We had planned to go on a picnic but the weather that day was atroc______ so we stayed at home.

 

(Write the whole word in the answer box.)

CORRECT ANSWER
atrocious
EDDIE SAYS
'Atrocious' means extremely bad or unpleasant.
  • Question 31

Complete the missing word in the following sentence.

 

We stayed in a really luxur______ hotel when we went to Dubai.

 

(Write the whole word in the answer box.)

CORRECT ANSWER
luxurious
EDDIE SAYS
'Luxurious' means extremely comfortable and indulgent.
  • Question 32

Complete the missing word in the following sentence.

 

There was a simultan________ broadcast on TV and radio.

 

(Write the whole word in the answer box.)

CORRECT ANSWER
simultaneous
EDDIE SAYS
'Simultaneous' means happening at the same time.
  • Question 33

Correct the punctuation error in the following sentence and rewrite the whole sentence.

 

"What time do you call this" sneered Mr Andrews, as Carly crept into the room.

CORRECT ANSWER
"What time do you call this?" sneered Mr Andrews, as Carly crept into the room.
EDDIE SAYS
Mr Andrews is asking a question, so a question mark is needed before the closing speech marks.
  • Question 34

Correct the punctuation error in the following sentence and rewrite the whole sentence.

 

We took: Billy, Jake and Adil to the match.

CORRECT ANSWER
We took Billy, Jake and Adil to the match.
EDDIE SAYS
A colon is only used before a list if the first part of the sentence makes sense on its own, e.g. We took three of my friends to the match: Billy, Jake and Adil.
  • Question 35

Correct the punctuation error in the following sentence and rewrite the whole sentence.

 

My dogs' tail is really long and fluffy.

CORRECT ANSWER
My dog's tail is really long and fluffy.
EDDIE SAYS
The apostrophe should come before the 's' as there is only one dog.
  • Question 36

Correct the punctuation error in the following sentence and rewrite the whole sentence.

 

"I'm never going there again, stated Katie."

CORRECT ANSWER
"I'm never going there again," stated Katie.
EDDIE SAYS
The speech marks should go around the words Katie speaks, so the closing speech marks should go after the comma.
  • Question 37

Correct the punctuation error in the following sentence and rewrite the whole sentence.

 

My favourite colour is green, my sister prefers blue.

CORRECT ANSWER
My favourite colour is green; my sister prefers blue.
EDDIE SAYS
Two main clauses should not be joined with a comma in this way. A semi-colon can be used or a conjunction (such as 'but' or 'whereas') could be used instead.
  • Question 38

In this sentence brackets have been used in the wrong place. Write out the whole setence again, moving the brackets to the correct place.

 

My great uncle who is (95 years old) is coming to stay with us.

CORRECT ANSWER
My great uncle (who is 95 years old) is coming to stay with us.
EDDIE SAYS
The brackets should go round the extra information. If the information in the brackets is removed, the sentence should still make sense.
  • Question 39

This time, the writer has not put any punctuation in the place marked x, but two punctuation marks are needed. Tick the box that shows the correct punctuation marks.

 

"What on earth do you think you are doingx bellowed Mrs Smith.

CORRECT ANSWER
?"
EDDIE SAYS
A question mark is needed because Mrs Smith is asking a question. It should be placed before the closing speech marks.
  • Question 40

There are two possible ways of punctuating the places marked in this sentence. Tick the two boxes that show the correct ways.

 

JackxElla's brotherxbought the tickets for us.

CORRECT ANSWER
brackets
commas
EDDIE SAYS
Extra information can be placed between commas or brackets. If this information is removed the sentence should still make sense.
---- OR ----

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