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Reading Non-Fiction: War

In this worksheet, students read two texts and compare them using analytical skills.

'Reading Non-Fiction: War' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 4

Curriculum topic:  Reading

Curriculum subtopic:  Make Critical Text Comparisons

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

Have a look at these two texts:

 

 

**************

Text one:

Military career

 

Starting pay 19K. Training on the job. Active service.

If you are motivated, hard working and a team player, the army could be the perfect profession for you. We have positions ready and waiting for chefs, engineers, medics, and drivers, as well as a whole range of other skills.

Be a leader. Be a fighter. Be a negotiator. Be a success.

Sign up today at your local recruitment office.

 

**************

 

 

Text two:

'Collateral Damage'

 

This is Fasima. As of this morning, she is an orphan. Fasima's family are counted as 'collateral damage' in the ongoing war in their country. In other words, they are innocent civilians who have been killed. I ask Fasima who actually caused the death of her parents. “I don't know,” she forlornly replies, “Nobody knows who started all this any more.” Fasima is not alone: there are thousands of children like her all around the world. She will probably end up in an orphanage. But not all children in her situation will have that option. Many will be put to work selling, stealing or worse.

 

**************

 

 

Now go through the worksheet and answer the questions related to these pieces of text. If you need to read them again, you can do so by clicking on the Help button.

Text one uses linguistic devices effectively. Which one does it not use?

rule of three

repetition

rhetorical question

Read this student's work:

 

The audience of the first text is young people who have left school or college.

 

What evidence could they give for this point? Choose three answers.

The image portrays the military as 'cool'.

There is alliteration.

Informal language: "19k".

Short, snappy sentences.

There are lists.

The writer of text two has put the heading of the article into inverted commas: '...'

 

What does this suggest about how he views the phrase collateral damage?

that someone is saying it

that is is a commonly used phrase

that it is trying to hide the reality of people being killed

In text two, Fasima's name is repeated throughout the article. Read these students' explanations for why this could be. Which one would get the MOST marks?

Mentioning the girl's name will make us feel like we know her.

Mentioning the girl's name will make us feel sorry for her.

In comparison to the nameless soldiers in text one, using the girl's name personalises the article and encourages sympathy.

The writer of text two uses the rule of three to emphasise the hopelessness of Fasima's situation.

Write the phrase that uses the rule of three in the box below. 

The writer of text two uses the adverb forlornly to describe how Fasima speaks to him. Which of the following words has a similar meaning? 

despondently

deviously

desperately

In what context would you expect to find an article like the one in text two? Choose two answers.

a broadsheet newspaper

the transcript for a play

an advert

a journalist's autobiography

a celebrity magazine

What is the main purpose for each text?

Text 1: persuade; Text 2: advise

Text 1: persuade; Text 2: inform

Text 1: advise; Text 2: persuade

Read this student's work. Which mark would you give him/her?

 

Text one is an advert for joining the military as a job.

A: Makes perceptive connections

B: Engages with the text

C: Understands the text

Read this student's work. What mark would you give him/her?

 

Although the main purpose is to inform the reader, text two also seeks to persuade through a subtle use of linguistic devices.

A: Makes perceptive connections

B: Engages with the text

C: Understands the text

  • Question 1

Text one uses linguistic devices effectively. Which one does it not use?

CORRECT ANSWER
rhetorical question
  • Question 2

Read this student's work:

 

The audience of the first text is young people who have left school or college.

 

What evidence could they give for this point? Choose three answers.

CORRECT ANSWER
The image portrays the military as 'cool'.
Informal language: "19k".
Short, snappy sentences.
EDDIE SAYS
Although all of the above features are present in the text, only the three above are explicitly aimed at a younger audience.
  • Question 3

The writer of text two has put the heading of the article into inverted commas: '...'

 

What does this suggest about how he views the phrase collateral damage?

CORRECT ANSWER
that it is trying to hide the reality of people being killed
  • Question 4

In text two, Fasima's name is repeated throughout the article. Read these students' explanations for why this could be. Which one would get the MOST marks?

CORRECT ANSWER
In comparison to the nameless soldiers in text one, using the girl's name personalises the article and encourages sympathy.
EDDIE SAYS
Although all three explanations are correct, option 3 will gain the most marks as it compares the two texts.
  • Question 5

The writer of text two uses the rule of three to emphasise the hopelessness of Fasima's situation.

Write the phrase that uses the rule of three in the box below. 

CORRECT ANSWER
selling, stealing or worse
selling, stealing or worse.
Many will be put to work selling, stealing or worse.
  • Question 6

The writer of text two uses the adverb forlornly to describe how Fasima speaks to him. Which of the following words has a similar meaning? 

CORRECT ANSWER
despondently
  • Question 7

In what context would you expect to find an article like the one in text two? Choose two answers.

CORRECT ANSWER
a broadsheet newspaper
a journalist's autobiography
  • Question 8

What is the main purpose for each text?

CORRECT ANSWER
Text 1: persuade; Text 2: inform
  • Question 9

Read this student's work. Which mark would you give him/her?

 

Text one is an advert for joining the military as a job.

CORRECT ANSWER
C: Understands the text
  • Question 10

Read this student's work. What mark would you give him/her?

 

Although the main purpose is to inform the reader, text two also seeks to persuade through a subtle use of linguistic devices.

CORRECT ANSWER
A: Makes perceptive connections
---- OR ----

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