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Reading Non-Fiction: Mobile Phones

In this worksheet, students read the article and analyse it to practise their skills.

'Reading Non-Fiction: Mobile Phones' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 4

Curriculum topic:  Reading

Curriculum subtopic:  Read in Different Ways for Different Purposes

Difficulty level:  

down

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

Firstly, read this article about mobile phones:

 

Mobile phones in the classroom?

 

 

Much has been said and written about the use of new technologies in the classroom. Those in favour argue that we need to keep up with modern developments: technology is now used all over the world every day, more so than many 'traditional' skills which are taught in school. Those against technology in school argue that until children are achieving a basic level in numeracy, literacy and proving their capacity to listen to a teacher, they should not be distracted by games, texting and other fruitless activities. Heather Kingston is a Deputy Head Teacher. She believes that technology has a vital role to play: “We cannot ignore the role technology will have to play in the lives of these young people,” she argues. “Living in the dark ages will only hinder them later on in life.”

 

Oliver O'Brien is also a teacher: “I understand the role and value of technology. That is why we have IT lessons and a fully functioning Information Centre in our library. Do we need mobile phones in the classroom? No! In my view, that privilege will be abused by many, putting a temptation there even for the most conscientious student. There is enough pressure on young people from the media as it is. In the classroom they should be safe from bombardment.”

 

 

The following questions are based on the article you have just read. If you need to look at it again, you can do so by clicking on the Help button above the question.

Look again at the image chosen for this article (you can do so by clicking on the Help button). Which of the following quotations does it support? 

"Technology has a vital role to play"

"they should not be distracted by games"

"that is why we have IT lessons"

"There is enough pressure on young people from the media as it is"

Which of the following statements about this article are true? Choose two.

The writer shows both sides of the argument.

The writer uses an equal amount of words on each side.

The quotes for each side are of equal length.

The image used is neutral (not one sided).

It begins like an argument piece of writing.

Heather Kingston argues that not letting mobile phones in school is "living in the dark ages". How does Oliver O'Brien suggest that this metaphor is not true?

"We have IT lessons and a fully functioning Information Centre"

"Do we need mobile phones in the classroom?"

"that privilege will be abused by many"

Match up the literary devices used with the examples from the text. If you can't read all the text in the boxes, hover your mouse over them.

Column A

Column B

Rhetorical question
Do we need mobile phones in the classroom?
Rule of three
We cannot ignore
Personal pronouns
games, texting, and other fruitless activities
Alliteration
Fully functioning

Read this student's work. Which mark would you give him or her?

 

The article shows an argument, first one side and then the other. I think we should be allowed phones in school. We could check our school e-mail on them and do some work online.

A: Makes perceptive connections

B: Engages with the text

C: Understands the text

Read this student's work. Which mark would you give him or her?

 

Heather Kingston argues that people need to move with the times. She says that people who don't want phones in school are "living in the dark ages". This seems a bit negative.

A: Makes perceptive connections

B: Engages with the text

C: Understands the text

Read this student's work. Which mark would you give him or her?

 

Although at first glance this is a balanced argument, the underlying bias is clear. From the emotive image to the end line: "in the classroom they should be safe from bombardment", the writer is inverting the typical arguments of spoiling teenagers' fun and instead appealing to a sense of protection over them.

A: makes perceptive connections

B: Engages with the text

C: Understands the text

From what you have read and the overall tone of the article, how would you expect the rest of this text to continue?

More about what games you can play on mobile phones.

More about how the over use of technology can be damaging to teens.

More about the IT facilities in school.

More about how schools need to modernise.

The article uses some complex formal language. Imagine that you had to summarise it for some younger students. Match the complex words with their simple equivalents.

Column A

Column B

Bombardment
Pressure
Conscientious
Hard working
Developments
Ability
Capacity
Treat
Privilege
New things
  • Question 1

Look again at the image chosen for this article (you can do so by clicking on the Help button). Which of the following quotations does it support? 

CORRECT ANSWER
"There is enough pressure on young people from the media as it is"
EDDIE SAYS
The last quotation fits with the image of an unhappy, lonely and isolated young person, suggesting that schools should be protecting teens from the media.
  • Question 2

Which of the following statements about this article are true? Choose two.

CORRECT ANSWER
The writer shows both sides of the argument.
It begins like an argument piece of writing.
  • Question 3

Heather Kingston argues that not letting mobile phones in school is "living in the dark ages". How does Oliver O'Brien suggest that this metaphor is not true?

CORRECT ANSWER
"We have IT lessons and a fully functioning Information Centre"
EDDIE SAYS
The first quotation dismisses the accusation by proving that he is not anti-technology, just against having mobile phones in the classroom.
  • Question 4

Match up the literary devices used with the examples from the text. If you can't read all the text in the boxes, hover your mouse over them.

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

Rhetorical question
Do we need mobile phones in the c...
Rule of three
games, texting, and other fruitle...
Personal pronouns
We cannot ignore
Alliteration
Fully functioning
  • Question 5

Read this student's work. Which mark would you give him or her?

 

The article shows an argument, first one side and then the other. I think we should be allowed phones in school. We could check our school e-mail on them and do some work online.

CORRECT ANSWER
C: Understands the text
EDDIE SAYS
Although this students does understand the purpose of the text, they are missing any comment on possible bias and they add their own (irrelevant) opinions unecessarily.
  • Question 6

Read this student's work. Which mark would you give him or her?

 

Heather Kingston argues that people need to move with the times. She says that people who don't want phones in school are "living in the dark ages". This seems a bit negative.

CORRECT ANSWER
B: Engages with the text
EDDIE SAYS
This student can clearly understand the text and is beginning to search for the subtext beneath it.
  • Question 7

Read this student's work. Which mark would you give him or her?

 

Although at first glance this is a balanced argument, the underlying bias is clear. From the emotive image to the end line: "in the classroom they should be safe from bombardment", the writer is inverting the typical arguments of spoiling teenagers' fun and instead appealing to a sense of protection over them.

CORRECT ANSWER
A: makes perceptive connections
EDDIE SAYS
This student perceptively comments on the underlying bias and gives evidence for this interpretation.
  • Question 8

From what you have read and the overall tone of the article, how would you expect the rest of this text to continue?

CORRECT ANSWER
More about how the over use of technology can be damaging to teens.
  • Question 9

The article uses some complex formal language. Imagine that you had to summarise it for some younger students. Match the complex words with their simple equivalents.

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

Bombardment
Pressure
Conscientious
Hard working
Developments
New things
Capacity
Ability
Privilege
Treat
---- OR ----

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