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Consolidate Understanding of Different Sentence Types

In this worksheet, students revise the different sentence types they may come across and consider how they can use them for effect in their own work.

'Consolidate Understanding of Different Sentence Types' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 4

Curriculum topic:  Grammar and Vocabulary

Curriculum subtopic:  Draw on Others' Vocabulary/Grammatical Constructions for Own Writing and Speech

Difficulty level:  

down

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

An effective and interesting piece of writing uses a variety of sentence types for effect.

 

Simple Sentence

This sentence contains one main idea (or clause) which makes sense on its own and has one main verb.

 

Rosie kicked the ball.

 

Compound Sentence

A compound sentence usually joins two simple sentences (or two main clauses) using a conjunction or linking word

 

Rosie kicked the ball but Sophia ran away.

 

It is important to remember that the idea or clause either side of the conjunction should be able to make sense on its own.

 

Complex Sentence

This type of sentence has one main idea (or clause) and at least one extra idea (or subordinate clause) to give more information about the main point.

 

Rosie, who loved to play outside, kicked the ball

While the sun shone, Rosie kicked the ball.

 

In this case, the subordinate clause has to rely on the main clause for the sentence to make sense. It cannot exist on its own.

Match the sentence types with the definitions.

Column A

Column B

simple
a sentence containing one main idea (or clause) wh...
compound
a sentence consisting of two main clauses which bo...
complex
a sentence containing a main clause and at least o...

Which type of sentence is this?

 

The grass, which was green and luscious, swayed in the breeze.

simple

compound

complex

Which of the following words can be used as conjunctions in a compound sentence?

 

Tick two boxes.

and

because

who

but

which

Identify the main clause in this complex sentence. Type it in the answer box.

 

Sally went to the shop because her mum had run out of milk.

Which type of sentence is this?

 

John was a dentist but Harriet worked at the hairdressers.

simple

compound

complex

Identify the conjunction in this compound sentence.

 

Flora skipped around the garden but David stayed inside the house.

skipped

stayed

but

the

Identify the subordinate clause in this complex sentence and type it in the answer box.

 

Jack, who liked sailing, went down to the seashore.

Which type of sentence is this?

 

The moon shone eerily, half covered by wisps of dark grey cloud which danced around it in a mesmerising fashion.

simple

compound

complex

Shorten the sentence below by removing the subordinate clause to leave a simple sentence.

 

While the funeral procession drove slowly through the town, the church bells tolled.

Is the following statement true or false?

 

It is always better to use complex sentences in your writing.

true

false

  • Question 1

Match the sentence types with the definitions.

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

simple
a sentence containing one main id...
compound
a sentence consisting of two main...
complex
a sentence containing a main clau...
EDDIE SAYS
A simple sentence only has one verb or verb string so it is easy to identify. The easiest way to distinguish between compound and complex sentences is to check whether the clauses make sense on their own. If one of them depends on the other to make sense then it is a complex sentence.
  • Question 2

Which type of sentence is this?

 

The grass, which was green and luscious, swayed in the breeze.

CORRECT ANSWER
complex
EDDIE SAYS
This is a complex sentence as the subordinate clause, ‘which was green and luscious’, relies on the main part of the sentence to make sense.
  • Question 3

Which of the following words can be used as conjunctions in a compound sentence?

 

Tick two boxes.

CORRECT ANSWER
and
but
EDDIE SAYS
The other words in the list would be used to join a main clause to a subordinate clause so they would be used in complex sentences. 
  • Question 4

Identify the main clause in this complex sentence. Type it in the answer box.

 

Sally went to the shop because her mum had run out of milk.

CORRECT ANSWER
Sally went to the shop
EDDIE SAYS
The main clause is ‘Sally went to the shop’ as this is the part of the sentence which can exist on its own.
  • Question 5

Which type of sentence is this?

 

John was a dentist but Harriet worked at the hairdressers.

CORRECT ANSWER
compound
EDDIE SAYS
This is a compound sentence as two main clauses have been joined using a conjunction.
  • Question 6

Identify the conjunction in this compound sentence.

 

Flora skipped around the garden but David stayed inside the house.

CORRECT ANSWER
but
EDDIE SAYS
The conjunction is ‘but’ as this is the word that links the two clauses.
  • Question 7

Identify the subordinate clause in this complex sentence and type it in the answer box.

 

Jack, who liked sailing, went down to the seashore.

CORRECT ANSWER
who liked sailing
who liked sailing,
EDDIE SAYS
The subordinate clause is ‘who liked sailing’ as this part of the sentence does not make sense on its own.
  • Question 8

Which type of sentence is this?

 

The moon shone eerily, half covered by wisps of dark grey cloud which danced around it in a mesmerising fashion.

CORRECT ANSWER
complex
EDDIE SAYS
This is a complex sentence as it contains many ideas, all relying on the main clause (the moon shone eerily) for it to make sense.
  • Question 9

Shorten the sentence below by removing the subordinate clause to leave a simple sentence.

 

While the funeral procession drove slowly through the town, the church bells tolled.

CORRECT ANSWER
The church bells tolled.
EDDIE SAYS
The main clause in this sentence is ‘the church bells tolled'.
  • Question 10

Is the following statement true or false?

 

It is always better to use complex sentences in your writing.

CORRECT ANSWER
false
EDDIE SAYS
Effective writing contains a mixture of sentence types. Complex sentences are good for descriptive passages whereas simple sentences can create tension and drama if used in isolation.
---- OR ----

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