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Simple Circuits 2

In this worksheet, students will be challenged to look more deeply at electric circuits to see how they operate, whether they work or not, and why.

'Simple Circuits 2' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:   Electricity

Curriculum subtopic:   Simple Circuits

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

Electric circuits are fascinating in their own right, but learning about them can really help you to learn about how electrical appliances in general work; as you go through your science course you will learn more and more about them, so getting the basics right now will really help you to add new stuff later on as you learn more about them.

 

This worksheet will give you the chance to look at lots of different circuits and decide what the effect of changing the circuit might be, what might be wrong with the circuit and how different components (things in the circuit) behave.

 

So, let's get plugged into this worksheet!

Pick one reason from the list why a circuit may not work.

there is more than one bulb

the battery is small

there is a gap in the circuit

What is the wire used to make the electric circuit usually made from?

copper

plastic

string

Look at this circuit:

 

1 cell/1 lamp

 

If we add another battery to the circuit, what do you think will happen to the bulb?

it won't change

it will get brighter

it will become less bright (dimmer)

Look at this circuit:

 

 1 cell/1 lamp

 

If we add another bulb to the circuit, what do you think will happen to the first bulb?

it won't change

it will get brighter

it will become less bright (dimmer)

Here are two circuits with a switch in them; the switch is connected to a battery and a buzzer:

 

CIRCUIT A CIRCUIT B

 

 

Look carefully at the two switches. In which circuit do you predict the buzzer is switched 'ON'?

Circuit A

Circuit B

This circuit does not work - why not?

 

the battery is dead

there is a gap in the circuit

the bulb has 'blown'

Look at this circuit and decide what will happen when it is connected:

 

1 cell/2 lamps in series

nothing happens

both bulbs will light up

only one bulb will light up (there's one battery)

Look at this circuit and decide what is happening:

 

nothing happens

both bulbs will light up

only one bulb will light up (there's one battery)

Look at this circuit and decide what will happen in it:

 

1 cell/1 lamp/1 buzzer in series

nothing happens

the bulb works but the buzzer doesn't

the buzzer makes a sound but the bulb is out

both the buzzer and the bulb come on

Look at this circuit and decide what will happen in it:

 

the bulb lights

the bulb flashes and goes out

it doesn't work

  • Question 1

Pick one reason from the list why a circuit may not work.

CORRECT ANSWER
there is a gap in the circuit
EDDIE SAYS
More than one bulb means they won't be as bright as one, a small battery gives less electric current but if there's a gap the electricity won't flow across it, so .... it won't work.
  • Question 2

What is the wire used to make the electric circuit usually made from?

CORRECT ANSWER
copper
EDDIE SAYS
Metals are good conductors of electricity and a metal called copper is used in most electrical wires. The copper is surrounded by plastic, which doesn't conduct electricity, so you don't come into contact with the bare wire and get an electric shock.
  • Question 3

Look at this circuit:

 

1 cell/1 lamp

 

If we add another battery to the circuit, what do you think will happen to the bulb?

CORRECT ANSWER
it will get brighter
EDDIE SAYS
More batteries means more to 'push' the electricity around (like having TWO locomotives pulling a train), so the electricity can go faster which makes the bulb brighter.
  • Question 4

Look at this circuit:

 

 1 cell/1 lamp

 

If we add another bulb to the circuit, what do you think will happen to the first bulb?

CORRECT ANSWER
it will become less bright (dimmer)
EDDIE SAYS
Bulbs light up - they are hard for the battery to 'push' the electricity through; so when you add another bulb the electric current slows down which makes the bulbs dimmer.
  • Question 5

Here are two circuits with a switch in them; the switch is connected to a battery and a buzzer:

 

CIRCUIT A CIRCUIT B

 

 

Look carefully at the two switches. In which circuit do you predict the buzzer is switched 'ON'?

CORRECT ANSWER
Circuit B
EDDIE SAYS
To start off with it looks like a 'Spot the Difference' game! In fact there's only one difference: the switch. In Circuit A it is switched up. That usually means 'off'. In Circuit B it's switched down which usually means 'on'. So in Circuit B there should be an annoying buzzing sound coming out because that circuit is complete!
  • Question 6

This circuit does not work - why not?

 

CORRECT ANSWER
there is a gap in the circuit
EDDIE SAYS
There is clearly a gap in the circuit - as you know it has to be complete for electricity to flow. The other two explanations MIGHT be right, but in science you start with the evidence you have in front of you. There's a gap, so that's the problem.
  • Question 7

Look at this circuit and decide what will happen when it is connected:

 

1 cell/2 lamps in series

CORRECT ANSWER
both bulbs will light up
EDDIE SAYS
Is this circuit complete? Are there two bulbs connected to each other and to one battery? Then it will work and because the battery HAS TO push the electricity through BOTH bulbs, it will go more slowly, which means they are on but not as bright as they'd be on their own.
  • Question 8

Look at this circuit and decide what is happening:

 

CORRECT ANSWER
nothing happens
EDDIE SAYS
Is this circuit complete? This time the answer is "no" which must mean that no electric current will flow. This circuit is not working.
  • Question 9

Look at this circuit and decide what will happen in it:

 

1 cell/1 lamp/1 buzzer in series

CORRECT ANSWER
both the buzzer and the bulb come on
EDDIE SAYS
Again ask the questions: is the circuit complete? Is the bulb connected to the battery? Is the buzzer connected too? Then both of them must come on. The battery will push electricity through the buzzer (making a squeaky sound) and the bulb (which lights up dimly), so both are working.
  • Question 10

Look at this circuit and decide what will happen in it:

 

CORRECT ANSWER
it doesn't work
EDDIE SAYS
This time you have to look REALLY carefully: it seems to be a complete circuit BUT the batteries are facing each other (+ to +) which means that the circuit won't work. The batteries are trying to push electric current in opposite directions, so nothing comes on.
---- OR ----

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