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Uses of Electricity

In this worksheet students look at different appliances and objects to determine whether they use mains electricity, batteries or whether they do not require an electrical supply.

'Uses of Electricity' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:  Electricity

Curriculum subtopic:  Common Electrical Appliances

Difficulty level:  

down

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

Electricity is SOOO useful! We have electricity in loads and loads of things that we use every day. Sometimes that electricity comes from the mains (it has to be plugged in) and sometimes it comes from batteries.

 

However, there are even more things we use that don't use electricity.  In this worksheet you have to sort out things that need electricity from things that don't. You also have to decide whether that electrical supply comes from mains electricity or from batteries.

 

Should be a buzz!!

Here is a variety of ordinary household objects. Some need electricity to make them work and some don't. For each one decide "YES" if it needs electricity and "NO" if it doesn't.

 

TV VACUUM CLEANER WHISK STAPLER TORCH
TRUMPET TOY CAR BAR HEATER WASHING MACHINE MP3 PLAYER
       
    SOAP DISPENSER    

 

Column A

Column B

TV
yes
vacuum cleaner
no
whisk
yes
stapler
yes
torch
no
trumpet
no
toy car
no
bar heater
yes
washing machine
yes
mp3 player
yes
soap dispenser
no

Some appliances use mains electricity while others use electricity from batteries.

Here are eight objects - tick the ones that work off mains electricity.

 

FRIDGE REMOTE CONTROL MOBILE PHONE REMOTE-CONTROL CAR
COMPUTER ALARM CLOCK TABLE LAMP MICROWAVE
fridge

remote control

mobile phone

remote control car

desktop computer

alarm clock

table lamp

microwave

It's important to know what sort of battery goes into different objects.

Here are four things that use batteries - try to match the correct battery to the object that uses it.

 

 
CAR   BATTERY A
 
WRISTWATCH   BATTERY B
 
BATTERY-OPERATED CAR   BATTERY C
  
RADIO   BATTERY D

 

Column A

Column B

car
battery D
wristwatch
battery B
battery-operated car
battery A
radio
battery C

Here are some objects that need electricity to make them work:

 

 

   
A B C
 
D E F

 

Match them up with what they do: light up, heat up or make a sound.

Column A

Column B

A
light up
B
heat up
C
light up
D
make a sound
E
heat up
F
make a sound

Lots of things work on batteries. It's important that you put the batteries in the right way round.

 

 

 

What happens if you don't?

nothing much - it usually works anyway

it won't work at all

it might get hot and explode

Batteries have different symbols at either end of them so you can tell which way to put them into the appliance.

 

 

What are these symbols?

red and black

tick and cross

plus and minus

Some special batteries can be put into an electrical box which is plugged into the mains and they are "refilled" with electricity.

 

 

What is this special box called?

battery recharger

battery refiller

battery refresher

  • Question 1

Here is a variety of ordinary household objects. Some need electricity to make them work and some don't. For each one decide "YES" if it needs electricity and "NO" if it doesn't.

 

TV VACUUM CLEANER WHISK STAPLER TORCH
TRUMPET TOY CAR BAR HEATER WASHING MACHINE MP3 PLAYER
       
    SOAP DISPENSER    

 

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

TV
yes
vacuum cleaner
yes
whisk
no
stapler
no
torch
yes
trumpet
no
toy car
no
bar heater
yes
washing machine
yes
mp3 player
yes
soap dispenser
no
EDDIE SAYS
What a lot to choose from! Hopefully you managed to get most of them right - some are obvious, some a little trickier.
  • Question 2

Some appliances use mains electricity while others use electricity from batteries.

Here are eight objects - tick the ones that work off mains electricity.

 

FRIDGE REMOTE CONTROL MOBILE PHONE REMOTE-CONTROL CAR
COMPUTER ALARM CLOCK TABLE LAMP MICROWAVE
CORRECT ANSWER
fridge
desktop computer
table lamp
microwave
EDDIE SAYS
Again, some are trickier than others. You might have ticked the mobile phone for instance: you have to plug it in but that's only to charge the battery up - it runs off its battery. A desktop computer is always running off the mains whereas a laptop is designed to be used off batteries, like tablet PCs.
  • Question 3

It's important to know what sort of battery goes into different objects.

Here are four things that use batteries - try to match the correct battery to the object that uses it.

 

 
CAR   BATTERY A
 
WRISTWATCH   BATTERY B
 
BATTERY-OPERATED CAR   BATTERY C
  
RADIO   BATTERY D

 

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

car
battery B
wristwatch
battery A
battery-operated car
battery C
radio
battery D
EDDIE SAYS
If you found that difficult don't worry - you'll get to know these the more you use them. A watch is small so it'll need a tiny battery - these little round ones are called button cells. Many toys will use the popular AA batteries but things that need more electricity use fatter D batteries (like the radio). Cars have massive 12 volt batteries that are very heavy - they have a lot of work to do in a car. Even if you've never seen one before, you could probably work out that that was the only one left!
  • Question 4

Here are some objects that need electricity to make them work:

 

 

   
A B C
 
D E F

 

Match them up with what they do: light up, heat up or make a sound.

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

A
heat up
B
make a sound
C
make a sound
D
light up
E
heat up
F
light up
EDDIE SAYS
Once you'd worked out what each object was that wasn't too difficult! Probably the only really tricky one was the DVD player: IT doesn't make sound - the TV it's connected to does. The player lights up so you can see what it's doing.
  • Question 5

Lots of things work on batteries. It's important that you put the batteries in the right way round.

 

 

 

What happens if you don't?

CORRECT ANSWER
it won't work at all
EDDIE SAYS
The batteries complete an electric circuit so if they are put in the wrong way round then the electricity cannot flow and the device won't work. Don't worry - putting the batteries in wrongly is not dangerous, just annoying!
  • Question 6

Batteries have different symbols at either end of them so you can tell which way to put them into the appliance.

 

 

What are these symbols?

CORRECT ANSWER
plus and minus
EDDIE SAYS
The symbols on either end of a battery (or on the terminals) are plus (+) and minus (-) (actually called positive and negative!). These show which way to put them in because the electricity flows in a particular direction and it won't flow at all if they go in the wrong way round.
  • Question 7

Some special batteries can be put into an electrical box which is plugged into the mains and they are "refilled" with electricity.

 

 

What is this special box called?

CORRECT ANSWER
battery recharger
EDDIE SAYS
You RECHARGE the batteries, i.e. refill them with electric charge, so it is called a battery recharger.
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