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Habitats 2: Who Lives Where?

This worksheet challenges the students to deduce the most suitable habitat for a particular organism.

'Habitats 2: Who Lives Where?' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:  Living Things and Their Habitats

Curriculum subtopic:  Classification and Environment

Difficulty level:  

down

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

 A HABITAT is a place where an organism lives - it is its home. A habitat must provide three things to be suitable:

a) the right sort of SHELTER, for example: the ocean is no good for a robin as there's no nesting material for it;

b) the right sort of FOOD, for example: an osprey eats fish so it won't be found living in a forest;

c) a suitable MATE, for example: if a rat swims to an island where there are no other rats, the rat species will not survive there once it dies.

In each of the following questions use your knowledge to work out what lives where (and why!).

Habitat A has a large number of trees growing closely together. It rains for several hours every day and is hot and humid.

Which of these animals would be best suited to these conditions?

Elephant

Frog

Hunting Dog

Habitat B is rocky and bare. The temperature often falls to below 0oC and there is little shelter from the cold winds.

Which of these animals would be best suited to these conditions?

Snake

Gorilla

Mountain Goat

Habitat C provides ideal conditions for a slug.

What sort of habitat do you think it is?

sunny and warm

cool and damp

cool and dry

Habitat D has a large colony of rabbits.

What conditions do you think are most likely to be found in their habitat?

sandy soil and grassy slopes

thick pine forest

rocky slopes with crevices

Habitat E used to have lots of squirrels but there are few there now.

What is the most likely reason for this?

more people are walking their dogs in the wood

there has been too much rain

there was a poor nut harvest

Habitat F is very sandy. The temperature by day is above 40oC whilst at night it can fall to below -10oC. It rains infrequently and no more than 25cm rain falls each year.

Which of these plants might best be able to survive there?

Cactus

Oak Tree

Grass

Why would you be unlikely to find an eagle living in a forest?

lack of room to fly between trees

lack of sustainable food

too dark and cold

I have three animals and they all like different conditions.

Can you match the animal with the conditions that suit it best?

Column A

Column B

Slug
sunny and warm
Butterfly
damp and cool
Dragonfly
damp and warm

Sometimes animals can help plants to grow well in a habitat.

Can you match up the animal with how best they help the plant to succeed?

Column A

Column B

Sheep
hooked seeds catch in its fur and are carried to a...
Squirrel
graze other plants that competes with it
Blackbird
eats fruit and passes out the seeds in its droppin...
Bee
pollinates flowers
Dog
buries acorns

The effect of humans on habitats can be enormous.

What would be the result of introducing dogs and cats on to an island where there were previously NO predators?

dogs and cats will fight each other

dogs and cats will kill the island's animals

dogs and cats will adapt to eat plants

  • Question 1

Habitat A has a large number of trees growing closely together. It rains for several hours every day and is hot and humid.

Which of these animals would be best suited to these conditions?

CORRECT ANSWER
Frog
EDDIE SAYS
Frogs live where conditions are damp (they breathe through their damp skin as well as their lungs), so the rainforest would suit them best.
  • Question 2

Habitat B is rocky and bare. The temperature often falls to below 0oC and there is little shelter from the cold winds.

Which of these animals would be best suited to these conditions?

CORRECT ANSWER
Mountain Goat
EDDIE SAYS
Mountain goats are adapted to life in rocky places with their small tough hooves that fit into tiny crevices in the rock. Their thick coat helps to protect them from the cold winds.
  • Question 3

Habitat C provides ideal conditions for a slug.

What sort of habitat do you think it is?

CORRECT ANSWER
cool and damp
EDDIE SAYS
Slugs dry out fairly easily so have to stay where there is plenty of moisture, but they don't like heat. That's why in the UK they're often found under logs and rocks.
  • Question 4

Habitat D has a large colony of rabbits.

What conditions do you think are most likely to be found in their habitat?

CORRECT ANSWER
sandy soil and grassy slopes
EDDIE SAYS
Rabbits are burrowers - sandy soil is easy to make warrens in, unlike rocky areas or a forest with all its roots, neither of which provide lots of good food plants either.
  • Question 5

Habitat E used to have lots of squirrels but there are few there now.

What is the most likely reason for this?

CORRECT ANSWER
there was a poor nut harvest
EDDIE SAYS
Whilst squirrels might prefer fewer dogs and less rain it is unlikely to have a big impact on their population. Not having enough food to sustain their numbers will definitely reduce their population.
  • Question 6

Habitat F is very sandy. The temperature by day is above 40oC whilst at night it can fall to below -10oC. It rains infrequently and no more than 25cm rain falls each year.

Which of these plants might best be able to survive there?

CORRECT ANSWER
Cactus
EDDIE SAYS
Habitat F is a desert. A desert is a place which is very dry (rather than always being hot) and anything living there has to adapt to those conditions. Cacti can store water and without leaves are better able to hold on to it.
  • Question 7

Why would you be unlikely to find an eagle living in a forest?

CORRECT ANSWER
lack of room to fly between trees
EDDIE SAYS
Eagles spend much of their time soaring high above the landscape looking for food - they could not do this in a forest because the trees are too close together (so a good place for their prey to shelter!).
  • Question 8

I have three animals and they all like different conditions.

Can you match the animal with the conditions that suit it best?

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

Slug
damp and cool
Butterfly
sunny and warm
Dragonfly
damp and warm
EDDIE SAYS
Slugs have moist skins and need to stay where it's damp and cool (under a rock for example). Butterflies need warm, sunny conditions to be at their most active looking for food. Dragonflies hunt near ponds and rivers, especially, and need warm conditions to encourage their insect prey out.
  • Question 9

Sometimes animals can help plants to grow well in a habitat.

Can you match up the animal with how best they help the plant to succeed?

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

Sheep
graze other plants that competes ...
Squirrel
buries acorns
Blackbird
eats fruit and passes out the see...
Bee
pollinates flowers
Dog
hooked seeds catch in its fur and...
EDDIE SAYS
Sheep grazing encourages grass which copes with grazing much better than other plants. Plants adapt their seeds to be carried away, so squirrels eat acorns and bury extra ones for later, blackbirds love coloured berries and the seeds pass out in their droppings while plants like "sticky willy" have hooks in their fruits to catch in fur and so are carried away. Flowers attract bees to carry their pollen and so help them to reproduce.
  • Question 10

The effect of humans on habitats can be enormous.

What would be the result of introducing dogs and cats on to an island where there were previously NO predators?

CORRECT ANSWER
dogs and cats will kill the island's animals
EDDIE SAYS
This has happened many times in human history: people arrive on an island, with their cats and dogs, and animals that cannot escape easily by flying or climbing are hunted and killed. Many species have been lost this way, such as the dodo in Mauritius.
---- OR ----

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