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Pushes and Pulls

In this worksheet, students will check their knowledge of pushes and pulls (simple forces) and gravity.

'Pushes and Pulls' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:  Forces

Curriculum subtopic:  Gravity

Difficulty level:  

down

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

PUSHES and PULLS are FORCES.

 

Children playing tug of war

 

Forces start objects moving and forces stop objects moving.

 

Pete and Tony are PULLING in opposite directions. When the PULLS are the same, Pete and Tony do not move because the forces are EQUAL and OPPOSITE.

In a tug of war, when the forces are not equal, one of the players will be pulled in the direction of the force and will be the winner.

 

We all feel as special 'pull', this force is called GRAVITY.

Gravity pulls objects towards the Earth.

Gravity on Earth

 

So, let's have a go at pushing and pulling and see what happens!

Which THREE of these statements are true for PUSHES and PULLS?

They are examples of FORCES.

They start objects moving.

Gravity is a pushing force.

They stop objects moving.

Pulls always act in the same direction.

Boy with tennis racquet

 

Chris likes playing tennis. He says: When I hit the ball, the force is...

a pull

a push

a smash

When Chris hits (pushes) the ball with his racquet, what effect does this force have on the ball? 

It makes the ball change direction.

It makes the ball stop.

It makes a hole in his racquet.

Which THREE of these are examples of forces making objects change direction?

wind blowing branches

a cup sitting on a table

a cup falling off a table

books stacked on a book shelf

a kite falling to the ground

Chefs

 

Ruth and Ali are baking. When they make their biscuit dough, they use pushes and pulls, forces, to mix the ingredients together.

 

They use a rolling pin to roll-out the dough. What effect do the pushes and pulls of the rolling pin have on the dough?

 

Rolling pin

stop the dough moving

change the shape of the dough

cook the dough

Which THREE of these are examples of forces changing the shape of objects? 

melting ice

falling leaves

moulding modelling clay

squashing a ball

stretching chewing gum

Gravity pulls objects towards the ground. The air around PUSHES against the falling object.

 

Moving basketball

 

We describe PUSHES and PULLS as...

equal forces

gravity

opposite forces

Child flying kite

 

Pierre is flying his kite on a windy day. Oh no, he let go of the string!

 

The kite does not fall back to the ground, but flies away.

 

Which of these explains the force which carries the kite away?

the PUSH of the wind

the PULL of gravity

the shape of the kite

Chris and Tony are investigating other pushes and pulls. They STRETCH the spring using a pulling force.

 

Spring

 

Which word is the opposite of stretch?

squash

compress

compose

When the boys pull the spring, it changes shape.

 

How can they describe the way the spring changes shape when they STOP applying this force?

It gets shorter.

It gets longer.

It stays the same.

  • Question 1

Which THREE of these statements are true for PUSHES and PULLS?

CORRECT ANSWER
They are examples of FORCES.
They start objects moving.
They stop objects moving.
EDDIE SAYS
Gravity is a PULLING force which pulls objects towards the Earth. Other pushes and pulls can act in any direction.
  • Question 2

Boy with tennis racquet

 

Chris likes playing tennis. He says: When I hit the ball, the force is...

CORRECT ANSWER
a push
EDDIE SAYS
Chris knows this! The force he uses to hit the tennis ball is a push - his muscles are pushing the ball forward using a tennis racquet.
  • Question 3

When Chris hits (pushes) the ball with his racquet, what effect does this force have on the ball? 

CORRECT ANSWER
It makes the ball change direction.
EDDIE SAYS
Forces also make objects change direction. We can push and pull things in different directions. Can you think of some examples?
  • Question 4

Which THREE of these are examples of forces making objects change direction?

CORRECT ANSWER
wind blowing branches
a cup falling off a table
a kite falling to the ground
EDDIE SAYS
When objects ARE NOT MOVING we describe the forces as being EQUAL and OPPOSITE. Otherwise, the forces being applied to an object make it move and so change its direction from what it was doing when it was still. Yes?
  • Question 5

Chefs

 

Ruth and Ali are baking. When they make their biscuit dough, they use pushes and pulls, forces, to mix the ingredients together.

 

They use a rolling pin to roll-out the dough. What effect do the pushes and pulls of the rolling pin have on the dough?

 

Rolling pin

CORRECT ANSWER
change the shape of the dough
EDDIE SAYS
Forces can change the shape of objects. When the students roll the dough flat, they apply a force to the dough using a rolling pin.
  • Question 6

Which THREE of these are examples of forces changing the shape of objects? 

CORRECT ANSWER
moulding modelling clay
squashing a ball
stretching chewing gum
EDDIE SAYS
To melt ice we need to warm it up - add heat energy. Leaves fall to the ground due to the force of gravity! All of the others are having their shape changed when a force is applied. Go and punch a cushion to check that out!
  • Question 7

Gravity pulls objects towards the ground. The air around PUSHES against the falling object.

 

Moving basketball

 

We describe PUSHES and PULLS as...

CORRECT ANSWER
opposite forces
EDDIE SAYS
If you push a door open, it goes one way. If you pull it, it goes the other. Opposite forces!
  • Question 8

Child flying kite

 

Pierre is flying his kite on a windy day. Oh no, he let go of the string!

 

The kite does not fall back to the ground, but flies away.

 

Which of these explains the force which carries the kite away?

CORRECT ANSWER
the PUSH of the wind
EDDIE SAYS
When the wind is strong, the force of this moving air is greater than the force of gravity, so the kite flies away - poor Pierre!
  • Question 9

Chris and Tony are investigating other pushes and pulls. They STRETCH the spring using a pulling force.

 

Spring

 

Which word is the opposite of stretch?

CORRECT ANSWER
compress
EDDIE SAYS
Oo, that might be a toughie. If you lie on a mattress or sit on a comfy chair, you compress (squash) the springs/foam. COMPRESS is the opposite of STRETCH, so the forces doing that work in opposite directions.
  • Question 10

When the boys pull the spring, it changes shape.

 

How can they describe the way the spring changes shape when they STOP applying this force?

CORRECT ANSWER
It gets shorter.
EDDIE SAYS
The spring returns to its original shape when the stretching force is removed. This property of springs is very useful, for example on liquid soap dispensers and ball-point pens. Can you think of other examples?
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