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Gases Around Us

In this worksheet, students will think carefully about the different gases around us and how we use them.

'Gases Around Us' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 3

Curriculum topic:  Chemistry: Earth and Atmosphere

Curriculum subtopic:  Composition of the Atmosphere

Difficulty level:  

down

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

Matches and gas burner Soda can Aerosol cans

 

There are lots of different types of gas. Gases have different properties, just as solids and liquids do, and we use them for different purposes.

 

Because many gases are colourless and odourless (they have no smell), we need to be careful when using them. Some useful gases are also poisonous.

 

The natural gas we use to heat our homes and cook with has an odour added to it before it is piped into our homes so that we can detect leaks. We use natural gas because it burns easily to provide us with energy, but it is also explosive.

 

 

Tree Fish

 

 

Without oxygen life on earth would be very different! Organisms use oxygen to release energy from food in the process called respiration. Green plants make their own food using light to combine carbon dioxide with water to make sugars. This is called photosynthesis.

The air around is mainly made up of which two gases?

carbon dioxide

chlorine

nitrogen

oxygen

helium

Which materials do plants use to make sugars?

oxygen and water

nitrogen and water

carbon dioxide and water

glucose and oxygen

Living organisms use which gas for respiration?

nitrogen

carbon dioxide

oxygen

natural gas

Which of these gases is used for heating and cooking?

natural gas

oxygen

unnatural gas

hydrogen

One of these gases makes the bubbles in fizzy drinks. Which one is it?

 

Soda bottles

oxygen

carbon dioxide

air

helium

Which gas are party balloons filled with to make them float? 

 

Balloons

methane

hydrogen

helium

oxygen

Sophie says that helium-filled balloons float because helium is a light gas which is less dense than air.

 

Is she right, or wrong? What do you think?

right

wrong

What name do we give gases which are used during operations so that patients do not feel pain and 'go to sleep'? 

laughing gas

anaesthetic gas

knock-out gas

poisonous gas

Natural gas has a property which makes it both useful and dangerous. What is it?

it has a smell

it dissolves in water

it is lighter than air

it burns easily

Seth is designing a safety poster about what to do if you think there is a natural gas leak in your home.

 

Which TWO of these dos and don'ts should he include?

Don't turn on or off any electrical switches

Don't open the doors and windows

Do collect your favourite DVDs

Do leave the house immediately

Do go looking for the source of the leak

  • Question 1

The air around is mainly made up of which two gases?

CORRECT ANSWER
nitrogen
oxygen
EDDIE SAYS
The air contains mostly oxygen and nitrogen (four fifths (the biggest part) of air is the gas nitrogen). There is a very small amount of carbon dioxide and some other gases such as helium.
  • Question 2

Which materials do plants use to make sugars?

CORRECT ANSWER
carbon dioxide and water
EDDIE SAYS
In the process of photosynthesis, plants take in two simple chemicals (

CO2 and water) and convert them into energy-filled sugars.

  • Question 3

Living organisms use which gas for respiration?

CORRECT ANSWER
oxygen
EDDIE SAYS
Respiration is a chemical change where sugars react with oxygen to make carbon dioxide, water and energy is released.
  • Question 4

Which of these gases is used for heating and cooking?

CORRECT ANSWER
natural gas
EDDIE SAYS
Natural gas is mainly methane with traces of other gases.
  • Question 5

One of these gases makes the bubbles in fizzy drinks. Which one is it?

 

Soda bottles

CORRECT ANSWER
carbon dioxide
EDDIE SAYS
Carbon dioxide has so many uses from the bubbles in your fizzy drink to fire extinguishers and blocks of 'dry ice' for keeping things cold and stage effects.
  • Question 6

Which gas are party balloons filled with to make them float? 

 

Balloons

CORRECT ANSWER
helium
EDDIE SAYS
Helium is one of the lightest (least dense) of gases and ideal for filling party balloons so they float. It also has the brilliant property of making your voice go all squeaky if you breathe it in!
  • Question 7

Sophie says that helium-filled balloons float because helium is a light gas which is less dense than air.

 

Is she right, or wrong? What do you think?

CORRECT ANSWER
right
EDDIE SAYS
Helium is a light gas which rises in air. This is because it is less dense than the air (this means that if you had the same volume of helium and also of air the helium would have the least mass). Some gases are more dense than air, for example carbon dioxide, so they sink!
  • Question 8

What name do we give gases which are used during operations so that patients do not feel pain and 'go to sleep'? 

CORRECT ANSWER
anaesthetic gas
EDDIE SAYS
Anaesthetic gases have an effect upon our nervous system so that we, in effect, go to sleep when we breathe it in.
  • Question 9

Natural gas has a property which makes it both useful and dangerous. What is it?

CORRECT ANSWER
it burns easily
EDDIE SAYS
Natural gas burns with a hot flame, but is highly flammable (catches fire easily and burns rapidly).
  • Question 10

Seth is designing a safety poster about what to do if you think there is a natural gas leak in your home.

 

Which TWO of these dos and don'ts should he include?

CORRECT ANSWER
Don't turn on or off any electrical switches
Do leave the house immediately
EDDIE SAYS
If you smell gas, leave the house straight away and leave the doors open to help the gas escape. Ring the emergency gas services when you are safe! One spark from an electrical switch can ignite the gas and cause an explosion.
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