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Solutions

In this worksheet, students will be helped to look over their work on what solutions are, what sort of things dissolve and how basic methods of separation work.

'Solutions' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:   Properties and Changes of Materials

Curriculum subtopic:   Dissolving and Solutions

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

In your science experiments you'll have played with all sorts of dissolving experiments, seeing what dissolves and what doesn't and seeing how to separate substances in different ways and why they work.

 

Pink fizzing tablet in water

 

This worksheet gives you the chance to practise some of these.

If you shake some salt and sand together you will have made a what?

 

SandcastleSalt

solution

solid

mixture

If you stir the sand and salt into water what will happen to the salt?

dissolves

sinks to the bottom

evaporates

What happens to the sand when you stir it into water?

dissolves

sinks to the bottom

evaporates

What would you use to separate the sand and salt after they have been stirred into the water?

sieve

filter

tweezers

How can you get the salt out of the water?

heat it

evaporate the water away

filter it

Think back over what you have suggested to separate the salt and sand. That series of experiments won't separate salt and sugar - why not?

 

SaltSugar

they're both white

they both dissolve in water

they join together to make a single chemical

Here is a list of different substances. Decide whether each one will dissolve in cold water or not and then complete the chart at the bottom.

 

Water

Column A

Column B

orange juice
dissolves
custard powder
dissolves
aspirin
doesn't dissolve
candle wax
doesn't dissolve
gravy granules
doesn't dissolve
sugar
dissolves
tea leaves
dissolves
sand
doesn't dissolve
salt
dissolves
hot chocolate powder
doesn't dissolve

If a substance will dissolve in water there are several ways of helping it to dissolve faster. See how many you can pick out from the list below:

stir it

use cold water

measure out the amount of water carefully

use a known amount of solid

crush the solid up first

use a thermometer

use warm water

Which of the following will leave a solid behind when the liquid is evaporated?

distilled water

tap water

sea water

pure alcohol

cup of tea

Fruit Shoot drink

How would you get a liquid to evaporate?

heat it

cool it

stir it

  • Question 1

If you shake some salt and sand together you will have made a what?

 

SandcastleSalt

CORRECT ANSWER
mixture
EDDIE SAYS
The salt and sand mix together, grains of both jumbled up next to each other - they're not joined into one new thing, they're just mixed together, so ... a mixture!
  • Question 2

If you stir the sand and salt into water what will happen to the salt?

CORRECT ANSWER
dissolves
EDDIE SAYS
The salt dissolves in water - what that means is that the grains of salt split up into tiny, tiny particles, too small to be seen, so it seems to disappear. It IS still there, but in minute particles of solid salt.
  • Question 3

What happens to the sand when you stir it into water?

CORRECT ANSWER
sinks to the bottom
EDDIE SAYS
Sand doesn't dissolve in water (just as well as otherwise seaside holidays wouldn't be such fun!), so it'll mostly sink to the bottom.
  • Question 4

What would you use to separate the sand and salt after they have been stirred into the water?

CORRECT ANSWER
filter
EDDIE SAYS
A filter is very clever: a sieve has quite big holes but with a filter the tiny holes in the filter paper trap the large grains of sand but allow the tiny particles of salt, dissolved in the water, to pass through.
  • Question 5

How can you get the salt out of the water?

CORRECT ANSWER
evaporate the water away
EDDIE SAYS
Filtering won't work as the salt passes through it with the water. 'Heat it' isn't as good as 'evaporate it' because that explains that the water separates from the solid salt that is dissolved in it.
  • Question 6

Think back over what you have suggested to separate the salt and sand. That series of experiments won't separate salt and sugar - why not?

 

SaltSugar

CORRECT ANSWER
they both dissolve in water
EDDIE SAYS
The salt/sand mixture was separated by dissolving, then filtering, then evaporation. Since both sugar and salt dissolve in water they'll both pass through the filter paper (together) and so when you evaporate the water, there they'll be again, left behind together.
  • Question 7

Here is a list of different substances. Decide whether each one will dissolve in cold water or not and then complete the chart at the bottom.

 

Water

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

orange juice
dissolves
custard powder
doesn't dissolve
aspirin
dissolves
candle wax
doesn't dissolve
gravy granules
dissolves
sugar
dissolves
tea leaves
doesn't dissolve
sand
doesn't dissolve
salt
dissolves
hot chocolate powder
doesn't dissolve
EDDIE SAYS
As time goes by and you have a chance to experience more and more substances you learn the sort of thing that dissolves in cold water - for example, just try making a nice cup of cold chocolate (with hot choc powder and cold water) and see what you think!
  • Question 8

If a substance will dissolve in water there are several ways of helping it to dissolve faster. See how many you can pick out from the list below:

CORRECT ANSWER
stir it
crush the solid up first
use warm water
EDDIE SAYS
Remembering that you are simply looking for ways of getting the solid to dissolve faster, from the list above only stirring it (fast mixing), crushing (the water can get at all of it) and using warm water (faster mixing) will help it to dissolve faster.
  • Question 9

Which of the following will leave a solid behind when the liquid is evaporated?

CORRECT ANSWER
tap water
sea water
cup of tea
Fruit Shoot drink
EDDIE SAYS
They all will unless the liquid is pure: only pure (distilled) water and pure alcohol are pure liquids with no dissolved solids in to leave behind when they evaporate away.
  • Question 10

How would you get a liquid to evaporate?

CORRECT ANSWER
heat it
EDDIE SAYS
In a liquid there are loads of tiny particles whizzing about. When you heat the liquid they whizz round faster and faster until they move so fast that some of them jump out of the liquid and into the air - that means they become particles of gas and that's evaporation!
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