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Differences Between Us

In this worksheet, students will be interpreting data from block graphs in order to find out the range of differences in a class.

'Differences Between Us' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:  Evolution and Inheritance

Curriculum subtopic:  Offspring and Variation

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

Aren't we all different? Different hair. Different skin. Different faces. Different heights.

 

People around the world

 

But then, aren't we similar: same body shape, heads, two arms and legs, ears and eyes.

 

Mrs. Bates's science class have been finding out about how similar and different they are. They have been looking at what colour their eyes are and they have been measuring their height. With help from their teacher they have drawn block graphs of the results to show how similar or different they are.

 

Let's join the class and see what's going on....

The students in Mrs. Bates's class went round each other recording what colour eyes each person has. They found four different eye colours:

  • BLUE
  • DARK BROWN
  • GREEN
  • HAZEL

 

When they had collected their data Mrs. Bates helped them to put it on to a block graph:

 

 

Look at the graph and decide how many students in the class had green eyes.

1

2

7

9

Here's their graph again.

 

 

 

Look carefully at it and decide what was the most common eye colour in the class.

blue

green

dark brown

hazel

Here's their graph again.

 

 

Look carefully at it and see if you can use the data on the graph to work out how many students were measured in Mrs. Bates's class.

9

15

18

20

Why do you think that there were no children with orange eyes in the class?

not enough children were asked

no one has orange eyes

no one had eaten an orange so far that day

Mrs. Bates's class enjoyed that investigation so much that next lesson they asked if they could measure something else about them.

 

Mrs. Bates said that their height (how tall they are) would be easy to measure and give some interesting results.

 

So they collected the data by using metre rulers to measure each student in the class. Once again Mrs. Bates helped them to draw a block graph of their results. This is what they found out:

 

 

Look carefully at the graph and see if you can tell what the height range of the tallest person in the class was.

121-125cm

126-130cm

131-135cm

136-140cm

141-145cm

146-150cm

Here is the graph again:

 

 

How many students were in the shortest height range in the class?

1

2

4

5

Here is the graph again:

 

 

What was the commonest height range in the class, in other words the one with the most number of students in it?

126-130cm

131-135cm

136-140cm

141-145cm

Here's their graph again.

 

 

Look carefully at it and see if you can use the data on the graph to work out how many students were measured in Mrs. Bates's class.

6

15

18

20

When the students measured their class's heights they found that it ranged from about 120cm to about 150cm. Have a guess at why some students are smaller or taller than others.

the tallest ones ate the most food

the shortest ones do the least amount of sport

it's mainly to do with their Mum and Dad

The students asked Mrs. Bates if they could do one more survey of differences between them.

 

If there is time, which of these would be a good thing to look at?

how many ears they have

what colour their hair is

what colour sweatshirt they're wearing

  • Question 1

The students in Mrs. Bates's class went round each other recording what colour eyes each person has. They found four different eye colours:

  • BLUE
  • DARK BROWN
  • GREEN
  • HAZEL

 

When they had collected their data Mrs. Bates helped them to put it on to a block graph:

 

 

Look at the graph and decide how many students in the class had green eyes.

CORRECT ANSWER
1
EDDIE SAYS
If you look at the green bar you can see that it lines up with the number 1 on the left-hand axis - which means only one student in the class had green eyes. Mind you, it's not a common eye colour.
  • Question 2

Here's their graph again.

 

 

 

Look carefully at it and decide what was the most common eye colour in the class.

CORRECT ANSWER
blue
EDDIE SAYS
If you look at the graph you can see that the highest bar is the one for blue eyes: 9 students had blue eyes, more than dark brown (7 students), so blue is the commonest eye colour in the class.
  • Question 3

Here's their graph again.

 

 

Look carefully at it and see if you can use the data on the graph to work out how many students were measured in Mrs. Bates's class.

CORRECT ANSWER
18
EDDIE SAYS
The way to do this is to add up how many students are in each of the bars: 9 + 1 + 7 + 1 = 18 students. That's 9 with blue eyes, 7 with dark brown eyes and 1 each of green eyes and hazel eyes. 18 in total.
  • Question 4

Why do you think that there were no children with orange eyes in the class?

CORRECT ANSWER
no one has orange eyes
EDDIE SAYS
In fact in humans orange is not an eye colour we have. Some birds, like some types of owl, have orange eyes, but not humans.
  • Question 5

Mrs. Bates's class enjoyed that investigation so much that next lesson they asked if they could measure something else about them.

 

Mrs. Bates said that their height (how tall they are) would be easy to measure and give some interesting results.

 

So they collected the data by using metre rulers to measure each student in the class. Once again Mrs. Bates helped them to draw a block graph of their results. This is what they found out:

 

 

Look carefully at the graph and see if you can tell what the height range of the tallest person in the class was.

CORRECT ANSWER
146-150cm
EDDIE SAYS
If you look at the graph you can see that there is one person whose height is between 146-150cm - that's the small green bar on the extreme right of the graph. It lines up with the number 1 on the left-hand axis - so one student was that tall.
  • Question 6

Here is the graph again:

 

 

How many students were in the shortest height range in the class?

CORRECT ANSWER
1
EDDIE SAYS
The shortest height range is the bar on the left-hand side: 121-125cm tall. That bar lines up with the '1' on the 'Number of Students' axis, so only one student was in that height range.
  • Question 7

Here is the graph again:

 

 

What was the commonest height range in the class, in other words the one with the most number of students in it?

CORRECT ANSWER
136-140cm
EDDIE SAYS
If you look at the graph you can see that the longest bar - the one with the most students in - is for students who were between 136 and 140cm tall. That group contained 6 students - more than any other.
  • Question 8

Here's their graph again.

 

 

Look carefully at it and see if you can use the data on the graph to work out how many students were measured in Mrs. Bates's class.

CORRECT ANSWER
18
EDDIE SAYS
The way to do this is to add up how many students are in each of the bars: 1 + 4 + 4 + 6 + 2 + 1 = 18 students. That's 1 in the shortest height range, 4 in the next and so on. 18 in total.
  • Question 9

When the students measured their class's heights they found that it ranged from about 120cm to about 150cm. Have a guess at why some students are smaller or taller than others.

CORRECT ANSWER
it's mainly to do with their Mum and Dad
EDDIE SAYS
You don't KNOW the answer to this yet - you'll be finding out about it in another year or two. How tall you are is to do with several things but the main thing is what you inherit from Mum and Dad. Their height has a big effect on how tall you end up and how fast you grow.
  • Question 10

The students asked Mrs. Bates if they could do one more survey of differences between them.

 

If there is time, which of these would be a good thing to look at?

CORRECT ANSWER
what colour their hair is
EDDIE SAYS
Hair colour is another thing that is fun to gather data about and see how similar or different everyone in the class is. Ears would be boring - two each, and it's likely they will all have the same colour school sweatshirt on - anyway it's nothing to do with their bodies or their growth - it's their clothes!
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