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SAT Practice: Scientific Enquiry 4 (2013/Levels 3-5)

In this worksheet students practise the 2013 SAT style questions similar of those contained in past SAT papers.

'SAT Practice: Scientific Enquiry 4 (2013/Levels 3-5)' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:  Practice Papers

Curriculum subtopic:  SAT Practice Papers

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

This worksheet contains 20 SAT style questions. Questions are taken from across the whole science strand including scientific enquiry (SAT 2013).

These questions are typical of the type students will come across during the examination and are appropriate for those students who will sit the level 3-5 paper.

Viscosity is a measure of how 'gloopy' or sticky a liquid is. 

Laura is investigating viscosity:

 

 

 She collects four test-tubes and four marbles. She also collects:

  • water
  • washing up liquid
  • cooking oil
  • salt solution

 

To make the test fair, the test tubes and marbles are the same size.

 

Which two 'liquid' factors must she keep the same?

the temperature

the amount of the liquid in the tubes

the colour

Laura leaves 2 cm at the top of each test tube when she adds the liquids.

She puts the test tubes in a test tube holder to keep them steady and up-right.

To collect a set of results, one at a time, Laura places a marble on top of the liquid in the test-tube and lets go.

 

 

What should she do next?

count out loud how long it takes to reach the bottom

measure the length of the tube

measure the time it takes for the marble to drop

turn the test tube upside down

watch the marble drop

Which force pulls the marble through the liquid?

friction

gravity

magnetism

Which force is slowing the marble down?

friction

gravity

air resistance

Can you help Laura to fill in the missing word in her prediction?

 

The more viscous the liquid, the ___________ the marble travels to the bottom of the tube.

Write one word.

Shadows move their position as the direction of the light changes.

Here's a picture of a plastic duck being lit up by a torch:

 

 

Look at the three possible shadows compared to where the torch is.

Which one do you think is correct?

A

B

C

Which of the following do you think will make the most distinct and clearest shadows?

Tick all the ones you think will.

greenhouse

paper hat

garden spade

car

glass of water

Mrs. Bates was investigating how the size of shadows changes with her science class.

They were using a teddy bear and a torch:

 

 

Mrs. Bates asked her students to move the teddy bear towards the screen, measuring the distance to the screen and the size of the shadow as they did so.

Here are their results:

 

Distance to screen / cm 50 40 30 20 10 0
Size of shadow / cm 55 48 41 34 27 20

 

How many cm does the image size change each time the students move the teddy bear 10 cm closer to the screen?

Write the number.

Mrs. Bates helped her class to produce a line graph of their results:

 

 

She then asked her students to write down what they thought the graph showed them. Here is what three of them wrote.

 

Tyler: "As we moved the teddy bear towards the screen, it got bigger."

James: "As the teddy bear moved further from the light, the image got smaller."

Jessica: "The shadow was smaller when the teddy bear was closer to the screen."

 

Who do you agree with most?

Tyler

James

Jessica

Here is their graph again:

 

 

Looking at the graph what can you conclude about how the size of the shadow changes as the teddy bear is moved towards the screen?

the shadow gets smaller

the shadow gets bigger

the shadow stays the same

Amy and Sam were on a school trip to a nearby seashore.

Amy filled her bucket with water from the sea and showed it to Sam: "That's got salt in it, Sam," she said. "Ugh, it also got bits of seaweed in it," Sam observed.

Back at school Sam asked Amy: "How can we get the seaweed out?"

 

 

What do you think Amy and Sam should do to separate the seaweed and sand from their seawater?

filter it

evaporate it

condense it

Here are some pieces of apparatus they had in the classroom:

flask
microscope
bunsen burner
funnel
filter paper
thermometer

 

Select all the equipment that they will need to separate the seaweed and sand from the seawater.

flask

microscope

bunsen burner

funnel

filter paper

thermometer

"Is it safe to drink now?" asked Sam. "Oh no," exclaimed Amy, "it's still full of salt!"

"How can we get the salt out then?" Sam wanted to know. "Oh that's easy!" laughed Amy.

 

Here's the apparatus Amy set up:

 

 

What happened when Amy heated the seawater gently?

Sam saw all the water boil away.

Sam saw steam leaving the dish.

Sam saw the water turn blue.

After a few minutes they saw a ring of white crystals appearing above the seawater.

"Look," cried Sam, "is that salt?"

 

 

Why was the salt left behind?

Salt is a solid and cannot boil away.

Salt always sticks to the side of containers.

Salt separates from hot water.

Sam looked mournfully at the salt. "I can't drink that!" he cried.

"Oh no, I've done the wrong experiment!" laughed Amy.

 

Sam wanted Amy to "get the salt out" of the seawater - why is her experiment wrong?

She shouldn't have heated the seawater.

She shouldn't have let the water evaporate.

She should have collected the water.

Balanced diets must contain the right amounts of protein, fats, carbohydrates, vitamins and minerals, fibre and water.

Our bodies use these different kinds of food for growth, energy and health.

 

Foods high in the following nutrients give us energy.

Tick two options from the list below.

protein

fats and oils

vitamins and minerals

carbohydrates

Carbohydrates can be divided into two groups. What are they?

sugar and starch

fruits and vegetables

Vitamins are substances which are essential for good health.

A large proportion of our diet should, therefore, be made up of which foods?

protein

fruit and vegetables

carbohydrates

Scientists identified a disease that makes teeth fall out, gums bleed and legs swell up! They discovered that this was due to a lack of vitamin C in the diet.

 

Which three foods in this list are rich in vitamin C and would, therefore, prevent this disease?

orange

rice

lemon

chocolate

bread

lime

bacon

Part of what we eat cannot be digested and passes straight through our bodies. This special material is needed to keep our insides healthy.

From the list below, first select the name of this special substance, and then select which foods provide our bodies with it.

fibre

carbohydrate

sugary foods

fruit and vegetables

  • Question 1

Viscosity is a measure of how 'gloopy' or sticky a liquid is. 

Laura is investigating viscosity:

 

 

 She collects four test-tubes and four marbles. She also collects:

  • water
  • washing up liquid
  • cooking oil
  • salt solution

 

To make the test fair, the test tubes and marbles are the same size.

 

Which two 'liquid' factors must she keep the same?

CORRECT ANSWER
the temperature
the amount of the liquid in the tubes
EDDIE SAYS
To make the test fair she must keep the temperature and the amount of the liquid the same.
  • Question 2

Laura leaves 2 cm at the top of each test tube when she adds the liquids.

She puts the test tubes in a test tube holder to keep them steady and up-right.

To collect a set of results, one at a time, Laura places a marble on top of the liquid in the test-tube and lets go.

 

 

What should she do next?

CORRECT ANSWER
measure the time it takes for the marble to drop
EDDIE SAYS
To give her an accurate set of results, Laura should measure the time it takes for the marble to fall to the bottom of the tube.
  • Question 3

Which force pulls the marble through the liquid?

CORRECT ANSWER
gravity
EDDIE SAYS
Gravity pulls all objects down towards the centre of the Earth.
  • Question 4

Which force is slowing the marble down?

CORRECT ANSWER
friction
EDDIE SAYS
The force between two surfaces is called friction.
  • Question 5

Can you help Laura to fill in the missing word in her prediction?

 

The more viscous the liquid, the ___________ the marble travels to the bottom of the tube.

Write one word.

CORRECT ANSWER
slower
EDDIE SAYS
The marble will travel slower when the liquid has more viscosity.
  • Question 6

Shadows move their position as the direction of the light changes.

Here's a picture of a plastic duck being lit up by a torch:

 

 

Look at the three possible shadows compared to where the torch is.

Which one do you think is correct?

CORRECT ANSWER
B
EDDIE SAYS
From where the torch is the shadow must fall in line with the duck and the light source, so B must be the one. A would form if the light was directly above and C if it was straight in front.
  • Question 7

Which of the following do you think will make the most distinct and clearest shadows?

Tick all the ones you think will.

CORRECT ANSWER
garden spade
car
EDDIE SAYS
Anything that's really opaque makes a good shadow as it won't allow any light through. Paper is a little translucent and both the other two are mostly transparent.
  • Question 8

Mrs. Bates was investigating how the size of shadows changes with her science class.

They were using a teddy bear and a torch:

 

 

Mrs. Bates asked her students to move the teddy bear towards the screen, measuring the distance to the screen and the size of the shadow as they did so.

Here are their results:

 

Distance to screen / cm 50 40 30 20 10 0
Size of shadow / cm 55 48 41 34 27 20

 

How many cm does the image size change each time the students move the teddy bear 10 cm closer to the screen?

Write the number.

CORRECT ANSWER
7
seven
EDDIE SAYS
You can see that the results change by 7 cm each time. As the distance to the screen decreases the shadow size decreases as well (in proportion), meaning that it gets 7 cm smaller with every 10 cm it move closer.
  • Question 9

Mrs. Bates helped her class to produce a line graph of their results:

 

 

She then asked her students to write down what they thought the graph showed them. Here is what three of them wrote.

 

Tyler: "As we moved the teddy bear towards the screen, it got bigger."

James: "As the teddy bear moved further from the light, the image got smaller."

Jessica: "The shadow was smaller when the teddy bear was closer to the screen."

 

Who do you agree with most?

CORRECT ANSWER
Jessica
EDDIE SAYS
Although Jessica's answer could be a little more detailed, it's closest to what they found out.
James is nearly correct: the shadow got smaller as the teddy moved further from the light (and closer to the screen) but he incorrectly called it an image.
Tyler said "it got bigger" - what does he mean by "it"?
  • Question 10

Here is their graph again:

 

 

Looking at the graph what can you conclude about how the size of the shadow changes as the teddy bear is moved towards the screen?

CORRECT ANSWER
the shadow gets smaller
EDDIE SAYS
It's clear from the results that as the distance to the screen decreases, so does the size of the shadow - that makes sense: less of the light is being blocked as the teddy bear is further from it, so the shadow (area of darkness behind it) is smaller.
  • Question 11

Amy and Sam were on a school trip to a nearby seashore.

Amy filled her bucket with water from the sea and showed it to Sam: "That's got salt in it, Sam," she said. "Ugh, it also got bits of seaweed in it," Sam observed.

Back at school Sam asked Amy: "How can we get the seaweed out?"

 

 

What do you think Amy and Sam should do to separate the seaweed and sand from their seawater?

CORRECT ANSWER
filter it
EDDIE SAYS
The solid particles of seaweed and sand are too big to fit through the tiny holes in the filter paper and so they are trapped, allowing the seawater to pass through.
  • Question 12

Here are some pieces of apparatus they had in the classroom:

flask
microscope
bunsen burner
funnel
filter paper
thermometer

 

Select all the equipment that they will need to separate the seaweed and sand from the seawater.

CORRECT ANSWER
flask
funnel
filter paper
EDDIE SAYS
The filter paper is fitted into the funnel and placed into the flask so that the seawater can be poured in allowing the cleaned seawater to drip into the flask.
  • Question 13

"Is it safe to drink now?" asked Sam. "Oh no," exclaimed Amy, "it's still full of salt!"

"How can we get the salt out then?" Sam wanted to know. "Oh that's easy!" laughed Amy.

 

Here's the apparatus Amy set up:

 

 

What happened when Amy heated the seawater gently?

CORRECT ANSWER
Sam saw steam leaving the dish.
EDDIE SAYS
When Amy started to heat the seawater gently it became hotter and began to steam. It would only boil away if Amy heated it until all the water was gone, which is a bad idea.
  • Question 14

After a few minutes they saw a ring of white crystals appearing above the seawater.

"Look," cried Sam, "is that salt?"

 

 

Why was the salt left behind?

CORRECT ANSWER
Salt is a solid and cannot boil away.
EDDIE SAYS
When a solid, like salt or sugar, dissolves in water it spreads out into tiny, tiny particles but it is still a solid. That means when all the water evaporates away, the salt stays behind.
If you find that hard to understand consider a pool with fish in. In hot weather water evaporates, the level goes down and the fish have less and less water to swim in - they cannot evaporate away!
  • Question 15

Sam looked mournfully at the salt. "I can't drink that!" he cried.

"Oh no, I've done the wrong experiment!" laughed Amy.

 

Sam wanted Amy to "get the salt out" of the seawater - why is her experiment wrong?

CORRECT ANSWER
She should have collected the water.
EDDIE SAYS
Sam wanted Amy to "get the salt out" of the seawater, because he wanted to have clean, unsalty water to drink. When Amy heated the seawater she allowed all the water to evaporate away when, in fact, she really wanted to collect it!
  • Question 16

Balanced diets must contain the right amounts of protein, fats, carbohydrates, vitamins and minerals, fibre and water.

Our bodies use these different kinds of food for growth, energy and health.

 

Foods high in the following nutrients give us energy.

Tick two options from the list below.

CORRECT ANSWER
fats and oils
carbohydrates
EDDIE SAYS
During digestion fats and carbohydrates are broken down into small food molecules that are used by the muscles to make energy.
  • Question 17

Carbohydrates can be divided into two groups. What are they?

CORRECT ANSWER
sugar and starch
EDDIE SAYS
Sugary, sweet foods can be digested quickly and provide instant energy. Starchy foods include rice, pasta, potatoes and bread. The bigger molecules in starches take longer to digest - these are slow release energy foods.
  • Question 18

Vitamins are substances which are essential for good health.

A large proportion of our diet should, therefore, be made up of which foods?

CORRECT ANSWER
fruit and vegetables
EDDIE SAYS
Fruit and vegetables contain vitamins for good health.
  • Question 19

Scientists identified a disease that makes teeth fall out, gums bleed and legs swell up! They discovered that this was due to a lack of vitamin C in the diet.

 

Which three foods in this list are rich in vitamin C and would, therefore, prevent this disease?

CORRECT ANSWER
orange
lemon
lime
EDDIE SAYS
Fresh citrus fruits such as oranges, lemons and limes are an excellent source of Vitamin C.
  • Question 20

Part of what we eat cannot be digested and passes straight through our bodies. This special material is needed to keep our insides healthy.

From the list below, first select the name of this special substance, and then select which foods provide our bodies with it.

CORRECT ANSWER
fibre
fruit and vegetables
EDDIE SAYS
Foods made with the whole grain, e.g. brown bread and bran cereals, contain a lot of fibre. Fruit and vegetables are a good source of fibre too.
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