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Uses of Salt and Chemical Manufacture

In this worksheet, students study the importance of salt in our lives, how it gets to our tables and ways in which some other important chemicals are manufactured.

'Uses of Salt and Chemical Manufacture' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 4

Curriculum topic:  Chemistry: Chemical and Allied Industries

Curriculum subtopic:  Life Cycle Assessment and Recycling

Difficulty level:  

down

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

Salt is very important in our lives. Its chemical name is sodium chloride. It has been used for years as a preservative for food and for flavour. Salt is necessary for daily consumption, but only in very small amounts. Otherwise, it can cause blood pressure to rise. It is also added to icy roads to melt the ice, making the roads safe to drive on.


Due to its uses, a few methods have been developed to obtain it:

  • Salt can be obtained from rocks by mining. Salt obtained this way is used on icy roads, so it does not need to be very pure.
  • When salt is needed for food, it is purified. Water is sent down a hole underground and salt is dissolved in it. Then it is pumped to be purified and water is evaporated, leaving the salt crystals.

There is a danger that subsidence is caused by digging so many holes under the surface of the Earth, which means the ground may collapse. Therefore, great care is taken to leave spaces between the holes so there is enough rock to support the Earth's surface.

 


Alkalis are also important to us. When they are dissolved they give a solution with a pH higher than 7. They are used to make soap, glass, neutralising soil and dyes. Alkaline compounds react with acids to give salt and water. The LeBlanc Process was used for a few centuries to make alkali sodium carbonate. Sodium chloride was mixed with sulfuric acid and was then heated with limestone and charcoal. However, this process was extremely polluting, destroying the surrounding environment. Hydrogen chloride (an acid gas) was released as well as solid waste that released a toxic gas, hydrogen sulfide. The latter smells like rotten eggs. Later, hydrogen chloride was processed to form chlorine, which is used to kill microorganisms in water. This is called chlorination.


Brine is sodium chloride dissolved in water. An electric current can be used to separate brine into different substances, each having many uses. The diagram below shows this in more detail. Amongst the products is chlorine, which is a disinfectant and also used to make plastic. Additionally, sodium hydroxide is used to make paper and purify polluted water and hydrogen can be used as fuel that does not pollute the environment.

 

What is the scientific name of salt? Write it in the answer box below.

Select two uses of salt.

flavour in food

melting ice

neutralising acids

in beauty products

How can salt be collected when dissolved in water?

 

evaporation

distillation

osmosis

What is the scientific name for the Earth’s surface collapsing after digging to extract salt?

Is the following statement true or false?

 

We need to consume a lot of salt daily.

true

false

Is the following statement true or false?


Alkalis give a solution with a neutral pH when dissolved in water.

true

false

Select two uses of alkalis.

 

making glass

food industry

neutralising soil

making coal

What was the name of the process followed to make alkali sodium carbonate?

 

The Alkaline Process

The LeBlanc Process

The LeWhite Process

What is the name of the gas that smells like rotten eggs?

 

hydrogen sulfide

hydrogen sulfate

hydrogen sulfite

What process is used to separate brine into different products?

 

  • Question 1

What is the scientific name of salt? Write it in the answer box below.

CORRECT ANSWER
sodium chloride
EDDIE SAYS
The scientific name of salt is sodium chloride.
  • Question 2

Select two uses of salt.

CORRECT ANSWER
flavour in food
melting ice
EDDIE SAYS
Salt is used for flavour in food and melting ice on roads to make them safe for use.
  • Question 3

How can salt be collected when dissolved in water?

 

CORRECT ANSWER
evaporation
EDDIE SAYS
When salt is dissolved in water, the water has to be evaporated in order to collect the salt. This process is called evaporation.
  • Question 4

What is the scientific name for the Earth’s surface collapsing after digging to extract salt?

CORRECT ANSWER
subsidence
EDDIE SAYS
By digging the Earth's underground space there is a danger that the surface of the Earth will collapse. This is called subsidence.
  • Question 5

Is the following statement true or false?

 

We need to consume a lot of salt daily.

CORRECT ANSWER
false
EDDIE SAYS
Too much salt causes blood pressure to increase.
  • Question 6

Is the following statement true or false?


Alkalis give a solution with a neutral pH when dissolved in water.

CORRECT ANSWER
false
EDDIE SAYS
Alkalis give a solution with a pH higher than 7 when dissolved in water.
  • Question 7

Select two uses of alkalis.

 

CORRECT ANSWER
making glass
neutralising soil
EDDIE SAYS
Amongst other things alkalis, are used to make glass and neutralise acidic soil for crops.
  • Question 8

What was the name of the process followed to make alkali sodium carbonate?

 

CORRECT ANSWER
The LeBlanc Process
EDDIE SAYS
The name of the process followed to make alkali sodium carbonate was called The LeBlanc Process.
  • Question 9

What is the name of the gas that smells like rotten eggs?

 

CORRECT ANSWER
hydrogen sulfide
EDDIE SAYS
The gas that smells like rotten eggs is called hydrogen sulfide.
  • Question 10

What process is used to separate brine into different products?

 

CORRECT ANSWER
electrolysis
EDDIE SAYS
Electrolysis is used to separate brine into different products, which include chlorine, sodium hydroxide and hydrogen.
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