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Exam Style 6 Mark Questions Chemistry 1

This is a selection of exam style questions worth 6 marks each. They test chemistry knowledge combined with literacy skills, so spelling and grammar must be correct in order to gain full marks.

'Exam Style 6 Mark Questions Chemistry 1' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 4

Curriculum topic:  GCSE Practice Papers

Curriculum subtopic:  Chemistry

Difficulty level:  

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Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

This is a selection of exam style questions worth 6 marks each. They test chemistry knowledge combined with literacy skills, so spelling and grammar must be correct in order to gain full marks.

Read the information on each question and type your answer in the text area provided without looking at the information for each question to really test yourself.

The topics covered are all Chemistry from the core, additional and some triple science topics. If you are doing triple science, this paper will help you with your Chemistry exam.

Even if your answer in terms of scientific knowledge is fully correct, you cannot gain full marks if your literacy is not good, so you must learn those spellings and make sure your grammar and syntax are excellent.

Carbon Monoxide

 

Incomplete combustion occurs when methane burns without enough oxygen. Instead of harmless carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide is produced by an incomplete combustion.

Carbon monoxide is an odourless, colourless, toxic gas. It reduces the amount of oxygen that can be carried around the body in the blood. Around 40 people die each year in the UK from carbon monoxide poisoning due to faulty gas boilers and fires. Hundreds more have to be taken to hospital. Usually, lack of ventilation and blocked outlet as well as faulty gas appliances are the causes of these deaths.

 

Harm from carbon monoxide in our homes can be reduced by:

  • Making sure that all fuel-burning appliances are serviced regularly.
  • Fitting homes with carbon monoxide detectors, to warn people if an appliance has stopped working properly.

 

QUESTION:

(a) Describe incomplete combustion and the steps homeowners should take to reduce harm from carbon monoxide.

Natural Rocks

 

Granite, limestone and marble are all natural rocks used in construction. See what they look like in the pictures below.

Granite is an igneous rock, as it is formed when magma/lava cools and solidifies. If it cools slowly granite has large crystals, if it cools quickly it has small crystals.

 

Limestone is a sedimentary rock. It is formed from compacted layers of sediment over millions of years and fossils can be found in sedimentary rock.

 

Marble is a metamorphic rock; it is formed when limestone undergoes high pressure and temperature.

 

QUESTION:

(a) Compare the three rock types in terms of structure, explaining how they were formed.

Atomic Structure

 

Atoms are the smallest particles of an element. They are made from three types of subatomic particles: protons and neutrons in the nucleus and electrons arranged in cells. There is a worksheet about the Atomic Structure and you can find more information there.

You need to know how electrons are arranged in cells and have a copy of the periodic table with you, so you can find fluorine and neon on it.

 

QUESTION:

(a) A fluorine ion (F) and a neon atom both have ten electrons. Use your knowledge of atomic structure and the periodic table to explain the similarities and differences between a fluorine ion (F) and a neon atom.

Metal 

 

All atoms of metals have only a few electrons in their outer shells. In solid metals the atoms are close together and the outer electron shells overlap. The outer electrons are free to move through the structure. They are not located in specific atoms, so they are called delocalised electrons.

The delocalised electrons move around randomly between the positive ions in all directions. This is why metals are good conductors of electricity. The layers of positive ions can slide over each other if a large force is applied; the ions are still held together. This is why metals do not break; they are malleable.

 

QUESTION:

(a) Copper is a metal that is used to make electrical wires and cables. Explain why copper is used in electrical wires.

Ethanol

 

Ethanol is used both in drinks, as a solvent, as a fuel and as a reagent to make other chemicals. During fermentation, sugars, such as glucose, are converted into ethanol and carbon dioxide through anaerobic respiration. See how this process happens in the following word and symbol equation:

                    yeast

glucose    ------------->   ethanol   +    carbon dioxide

C6H12O6 (aq) -------->  2C2H5 (l) +  2CO2 (g)

 

In the UK, sugar is extracted from sugar beet, but in hotter climates sugar cane is used. Wheat and other plants that contain carbohydrates can also be broken down into sugars.

 

QUESTION:

(a) Explain how a concentrated solution of ethanol can be made from glucose.

  • Question 1

Carbon Monoxide

 

Incomplete combustion occurs when methane burns without enough oxygen. Instead of harmless carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide is produced by an incomplete combustion.

Carbon monoxide is an odourless, colourless, toxic gas. It reduces the amount of oxygen that can be carried around the body in the blood. Around 40 people die each year in the UK from carbon monoxide poisoning due to faulty gas boilers and fires. Hundreds more have to be taken to hospital. Usually, lack of ventilation and blocked outlet as well as faulty gas appliances are the causes of these deaths.

 

Harm from carbon monoxide in our homes can be reduced by:

  • Making sure that all fuel-burning appliances are serviced regularly.
  • Fitting homes with carbon monoxide detectors, to warn people if an appliance has stopped working properly.

 

QUESTION:

(a) Describe incomplete combustion and the steps homeowners should take to reduce harm from carbon monoxide.

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
In order to get full marks for this question you must include the following points:
  • Complete combustion of oxygen requires sufficient oxygen.
  • Limited oxygen produces poisonous carbon monoxide rather than harmless carbon dioxide.
  • Limited oxygen supply caused in home by faulty gas appliance operation / lack of ventilation.
  • Householders ensure annual servicing and safety inspection (certificate), not blocking ventilation, installing CO detector.
    • Question 2

    Natural Rocks

     

    Granite, limestone and marble are all natural rocks used in construction. See what they look like in the pictures below.

    Granite is an igneous rock, as it is formed when magma/lava cools and solidifies. If it cools slowly granite has large crystals, if it cools quickly it has small crystals.

     

    Limestone is a sedimentary rock. It is formed from compacted layers of sediment over millions of years and fossils can be found in sedimentary rock.

     

    Marble is a metamorphic rock; it is formed when limestone undergoes high pressure and temperature.

     

    QUESTION:

    (a) Compare the three rock types in terms of structure, explaining how they were formed.

    CORRECT ANSWER
    EDDIE SAYS
    In order to achieve full marks for this question you must include the following points:
  • Granite is an igneous rock.
  • It is formed when magma/lava cools and solidifies.
  • If it cools slowly granite has large crystals, if it cools quickly it has small crystals.
  • Limestone is a sedimentary rock.
  • It is formed from compacted layers of sediment over millions of years.
  • Fossils can be found in sedimentary rock.
  • Marble is a metamorphic rock.
  • It is formed when limestone undergoes high pressure and temperature.
    • Question 3

    Atomic Structure

     

    Atoms are the smallest particles of an element. They are made from three types of subatomic particles: protons and neutrons in the nucleus and electrons arranged in cells. There is a worksheet about the Atomic Structure and you can find more information there.

    You need to know how electrons are arranged in cells and have a copy of the periodic table with you, so you can find fluorine and neon on it.

     

    QUESTION:

    (a) A fluorine ion (F) and a neon atom both have ten electrons. Use your knowledge of atomic structure and the periodic table to explain the similarities and differences between a fluorine ion (F) and a neon atom.

    CORRECT ANSWER
    EDDIE SAYS
    In order to gain full marks for this question, you need to include the following points:
    Similarities:
  • The same electronic configuration of 2.8 and are therefore both stable.
  • The same number of neutrons (ten neutrons).

    Differences:
  • Neon has ten protons and a fluorine ion has only nine protons.
  • Neon is a neutral atom but a fluorine ion is charged.
  • A fluorine ion can form a compound but neon is inert.
    • Question 4

    Metal 

     

    All atoms of metals have only a few electrons in their outer shells. In solid metals the atoms are close together and the outer electron shells overlap. The outer electrons are free to move through the structure. They are not located in specific atoms, so they are called delocalised electrons.

    The delocalised electrons move around randomly between the positive ions in all directions. This is why metals are good conductors of electricity. The layers of positive ions can slide over each other if a large force is applied; the ions are still held together. This is why metals do not break; they are malleable.

     

    QUESTION:

    (a) Copper is a metal that is used to make electrical wires and cables. Explain why copper is used in electrical wires.

    CORRECT ANSWER
    EDDIE SAYS
    In order to gain full marks for this question, you must include the following points:
  • The structure of copper metal.
  • Why copper conducts electricity.
  • Why copper can be drawn into wires.

  • Also, add information on:
  • Metal/positive ions.
  • In layers.
  • Surrounded by electrons.
  • Electrons are free to move/delocalised.
  • Conduct electricity.
  • Layers can slide over each other.
  • Still bound by electrons.
  • Metals can bend and be extruded a long way without breaking.
    • Question 5

    Ethanol

     

    Ethanol is used both in drinks, as a solvent, as a fuel and as a reagent to make other chemicals. During fermentation, sugars, such as glucose, are converted into ethanol and carbon dioxide through anaerobic respiration. See how this process happens in the following word and symbol equation:

                        yeast

    glucose    ------------->   ethanol   +    carbon dioxide

    C6H12O6 (aq) -------->  2C2H5 (l) +  2CO2 (g)

     

    In the UK, sugar is extracted from sugar beet, but in hotter climates sugar cane is used. Wheat and other plants that contain carbohydrates can also be broken down into sugars.

     

    QUESTION:

    (a) Explain how a concentrated solution of ethanol can be made from glucose.

    CORRECT ANSWER
    EDDIE SAYS
    In order to gain full marks for this question, you must include the following points:
  • Sugar/glucose/sucrose from sugar cane/beet.
  • Fermentation using anaerobic respiration of yeast.
  • Carbon dioxide and ethanol solution as the products of fermentation.
  • Ethanol extracted from the solution by fractional distillation.
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