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Exam Style 6 Mark Questions Chemistry 2

This is a selection of exam style questions worth 6 marks each. They test chemistry knowledge combined with literacy skills, so spelling and grammar must be correct in order to gain full marks.

'Exam Style 6 Mark Questions Chemistry 2' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 4

Curriculum topic:  GCSE Practice Papers

Curriculum subtopic:  Chemistry

Difficulty level:  

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Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

This is a selection of exam style questions worth 6 marks each. They test chemistry knowledge combined with literacy skills, so spelling and grammar must be correct in order to gain full marks.

Read the information on each question and type your answer in the text area provided without looking at the information for each question to really test yourself.

The topics covered are all Chemistry from the core, additional and some triple science topics. If you are doing triple science, this paper will help you with your Chemistry exam.

Even if your answer in terms of scientific knowledge is fully correct, you cannot gain full marks if your literacy is not good, so you must learn those spellings and make sure your grammar and syntax are excellent.

Ethanol 

 

Ethanol is commercially produced by two different processes. One uses ethene as the raw material and the other uses sugar.

 

QUESTION:

Describe these two processes and explain their advantages and disadvantages.

Copper

 

Copper sulfate can be made from copper oxide and sulfuric acid. The equation for the reaction is:

CuO(s) + H2SO4(aq) = CuSO4(aq) + H2O(l)

 

QUESTION: 

Describe how you would prepare crystals of copper sulfate from copper oxide and sulfuric acid.

The Atmosphere 

 

The Earth’s early atmosphere was very different to our atmosphere today. 

 

QUESTION:

Describe how it has changed and what gases make the atmosphere today.

Electrolysis

 

QUESTION:

Explain how gases are tested after the electrolysis of water.

Fractional Distillation

 

QUESTION:

Describe the process of fractional distillation.

  • Question 1

Ethanol 

 

Ethanol is commercially produced by two different processes. One uses ethene as the raw material and the other uses sugar.

 

QUESTION:

Describe these two processes and explain their advantages and disadvantages.

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
In order to get full marks for this answer, you need to mention the following points:
Process 1:
  • Sugar/glucose /sucrose from sugar cane/beet is converted to ethanol by fermentation/ anaerobic respiration by yeast.
  • Ethanol is extracted from the solution by fractional distillation.

  • Process 2:
  • Ethene from petroleum cracking is reacted with steam.
  • H2O adds across the C=C of ethene to make ethanol.

  • Comparison:
  • Distillation provides large quantities of impure ethanol relatively cheaply.
  • Ethene–steam process is more expensive but produces ethanol of high purity.
    • Question 2

    Copper

     

    Copper sulfate can be made from copper oxide and sulfuric acid. The equation for the reaction is:

    CuO(s) + H2SO4(aq) = CuSO4(aq) + H2O(l)

     

    QUESTION: 

    Describe how you would prepare crystals of copper sulfate from copper oxide and sulfuric acid.

    CORRECT ANSWER
    EDDIE SAYS
    In order to get full marks for this answer, you need to mention the following points:
  • Copper oxide is added to sulfuric acid, and the mixture stirred.
  • Copper oxide is added until in excess.
  • Mixture is filtered.
  • Solution is evaporated to approximately half volume.
  • The solution is left to crystallise.
    • Question 3

    The Atmosphere 

     

    The Earth’s early atmosphere was very different to our atmosphere today. 

     

    QUESTION:

    Describe how it has changed and what gases make the atmosphere today.

    CORRECT ANSWER
    EDDIE SAYS
    In order to get full marks for this answer, you need to mention the following points:
  • The Earth's early atmosphere was formed mainly from volcanoes. Volcanoes gave out lots of water vapour and carbon dioxide. However, some scientists believe that volcanoes gave out nitrogen. Overall, the Earth's early atmosphere was made of water vapour, carbon dioxide or nitrogen and some other gases in small quantities, such as methane and ammonia.
  • The water vapour later condensed - as the Earth cooled down - and formed the oceans. About 1 billion years ago, some organisms began to photosynthesise, taking in carbon dioxide and releasing oxygen.
  • Nowadays, 78% of the Earth's atmosphere is made of nitrogen, 21% of oxygen and the rest includes some other gases, like argon and carbon dioxide.
    • Question 4

    Electrolysis

     

    QUESTION:

    Explain how gases are tested after the electrolysis of water.

    CORRECT ANSWER
    EDDIE SAYS
    In order to get full marks for this answer, you need to mention the following points:
  • When a direct electric current is passed through water, hydrogen and oxygen are given off at the electrodes. The gases are collected in test tubes.
  • The test for hydrogen is holding a lighted splint in the mouth of the test tube. If the tube contains hydrogen, it will explode with a squeaky 'pop'.
  • The test for oxygen is lighting a splint and blowing the flame out so that the end of the splint is just glowing. When you put this in the mouth of a test tube containing oxygen, it will relight.
    • Question 5

    Fractional Distillation

     

    QUESTION:

    Describe the process of fractional distillation.

    CORRECT ANSWER
    EDDIE SAYS
    In order to get full marks for this answer, you need to mention the following points:
  • Crude oil is a mixture of hydrocarbons called fractions.
  • Distillation is a process used to separate mixtures of different liquids.
  • A heater boils the fractional distillation column and the vapour passes into the tower.
  • Different fractions have different boiling points so vaporise at different times and exit the column at different heights. They, then condense at different temperatures.
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