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Exam Style 6 Mark Questions Physics 1

This is a selection of exam style questions worth 6 marks each. They test physics knowledge combined with literacy skills, so spelling and grammar must be correct in order to gain full marks.

'Exam Style 6 Mark Questions Physics 1' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 4

Curriculum topic:  GCSE Practice Papers

Curriculum subtopic:  Physics

Difficulty level:  

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Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

This is a selection of exam style questions worth 6 marks each. They test physics knowledge combined with literacy skills, so spelling and grammar must be correct in order to gain full marks.

Read the information on each question and type your answer in the text area provided without looking at the information for each question to really test yourself.

The topics covered are all Physics from the core, additional and some triple science topics. If you are doing triple science, this paper will help you with your Physics exam.

Even if your answer in terms of scientific knowledge is fully correct, you cannot gain full marks if your literacy is not good, so you must learn those spellings and make sure your grammar and syntax are excellent.

Spectrometers

 

Light from the Sun is a mixture of different colours forming a spectrum (see picture). Gases in the Sun's and Earth's atmospheres absorb some of the light in the spectrum and cause dark bands to form in the Sun's spectrum.

Apart from a prism (as in the picture) objects with fine lines, like a CD can split white light into its different colours. Devices that contain something that split white light are called spectrometers. They are used to investigate light from the Sun.

 

 

Spectrometers are attached to telescopes. Light from a star, such as the Sun, passes through and is split into a spectrum. Spectra from different elements can be seen, so astronomers can collect information about the composition of the star.

One needs to know that there are more lines in the spectrum at sunset than at midday, because the Sun is at different angles in the sky at different times of the day; in the morning and evening the light has to pass through more of the atmosphere to reach us, so more light is absorbed by gases in the atmosphere, which results in more dark bands.

 

 

QUESTION:

(a) Describe how a spectrometer can be used to analyse light from a star.

Hydroelectric Power Stations 

 

Hydroelectricity is generated by falling water in places where water can be trapped in high reservoirs. It is available at any time (as long as the reservoir does not dry up).

Water can be pumped back up to the reservoir at night time, when demand for electricity is low. It can supply electricity when other renewables cannot (e.g. on windless day or at night when solar is low), and at the same time a hydroelectric power station can be started or stopped very quickly.

 

QUESTION:

(a) Outline how a hydroelectric power station generates electricity.

(b) Explain its advantages over other forms of renewable electricity generation.

 

Electrostatic Charge

 

Static electricity builds up on clouds and can cause huge sparks to form between the clouds and the ground. We see this as lightning caused by large particles flowing through the atmosphere. Lightning strikes can kill people and damage buildings by causing fire when discharging in thunderstorms.

Tall building are earthed with metallic spikes higher than the highest point of the building. This provides an opportunity to discharge by transferring the charge to the Earth. This is called earthing.

 

 

QUESTION:

The build up of an electrostatic charge on objects can be dangerous. The dangers can be reduced by earthing the object. The picture shows a large tower and other buildings on a street.

(a) Describe how electrostatic charge could be dangerous for the tower.

(b) Explain how earthing is used to reduce the dangers.

Anti-static

 

Rubbing two insulating materials together cause electrons to transfer from one to the other due to friction. However, they can also move along a conductor (an anti-static object). Otherwise a spark would be generated that can damage materials and equipment.

 

QUESTION:

Lenny works in a computer repair shop. While he inspects and repairs a computer he wears an anti-static wrist band (see picture). The wrist band is made from a material which conducts electric current.

(a) Explain how the wrist band prevents the build up of static charge, and why this is important.

 

Radioactive Radiation

 

There are three types of radioactive radiation: alpha, beta and gamma.

Alpha particles are emitted from the nucleus at high speeds. They lose some energy when they ionise an atom, so they have a short penetration distance. They are stopped by a few centimetres of air or a few millimetres of paper.

Beta particles are much less ionising so penetrate much further. They can be stopped by a few millimetres of aluminium or by an even smaller thickness of lead.

Gamma rays are even less ionising, they travel at the speed of light and do not have an electric charge. They are only partly stopped by a few centimetres of lead and can travel a few kilometres in the air. They need a very thick block of lead to be stopped or even better many metres of concrete.

 

QUESTION:

Betsy and Callum are investigating the radiation emitted from some radioactive rocks. They use a Geiger-Müller counter to detect the radiation, and they have some sheets of paper and aluminium foil.

 

(a) Name the three types of radioactivity, they might find.

(b) Describe an experiment they can do to find out which type of radiation is being emitted.

  • Question 1

Spectrometers

 

Light from the Sun is a mixture of different colours forming a spectrum (see picture). Gases in the Sun's and Earth's atmospheres absorb some of the light in the spectrum and cause dark bands to form in the Sun's spectrum.

Apart from a prism (as in the picture) objects with fine lines, like a CD can split white light into its different colours. Devices that contain something that split white light are called spectrometers. They are used to investigate light from the Sun.

 

 

Spectrometers are attached to telescopes. Light from a star, such as the Sun, passes through and is split into a spectrum. Spectra from different elements can be seen, so astronomers can collect information about the composition of the star.

One needs to know that there are more lines in the spectrum at sunset than at midday, because the Sun is at different angles in the sky at different times of the day; in the morning and evening the light has to pass through more of the atmosphere to reach us, so more light is absorbed by gases in the atmosphere, which results in more dark bands.

 

 

QUESTION:

(a) Describe how a spectrometer can be used to analyse light from a star.

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
For full marks the answer should include information on:
  • Spectrometers are attached to telescopes.
  • Light from star passes through spectrometer and is split into a spectrum.
  • Can see different spectra from different elements, so can work out composition of the star.
  • The dark band pattern depends on the time of the day, as light has to go through more of the atmosphere in the morning and in the evening, which means more of it is absorbed resulting in more dark bands.
    • Question 2

    Hydroelectric Power Stations 

     

    Hydroelectricity is generated by falling water in places where water can be trapped in high reservoirs. It is available at any time (as long as the reservoir does not dry up).

    Water can be pumped back up to the reservoir at night time, when demand for electricity is low. It can supply electricity when other renewables cannot (e.g. on windless day or at night when solar is low), and at the same time a hydroelectric power station can be started or stopped very quickly.

     

    QUESTION:

    (a) Outline how a hydroelectric power station generates electricity.

    (b) Explain its advantages over other forms of renewable electricity generation.

     

    CORRECT ANSWER
    EDDIE SAYS
    For full marks the answer should include information on:
  • The downward flow of water from a reservoir drives a turbine which is connected to an electrical generator.
  • Water can be pumped back up to the reservoir at night time, when demand for electricity is low.
  • It can supply electricity when other renewables cannot (e.g. on windless day or at night when solar is low).
  • It also creates a water reservoir.
    • Question 3

    Electrostatic Charge

     

    Static electricity builds up on clouds and can cause huge sparks to form between the clouds and the ground. We see this as lightning caused by large particles flowing through the atmosphere. Lightning strikes can kill people and damage buildings by causing fire when discharging in thunderstorms.

    Tall building are earthed with metallic spikes higher than the highest point of the building. This provides an opportunity to discharge by transferring the charge to the Earth. This is called earthing.

     

     

    QUESTION:

    The build up of an electrostatic charge on objects can be dangerous. The dangers can be reduced by earthing the object. The picture shows a large tower and other buildings on a street.

    (a) Describe how electrostatic charge could be dangerous for the tower.

    (b) Explain how earthing is used to reduce the dangers.

    CORRECT ANSWER
    EDDIE SAYS
    For full marks the answers should include information on:
  • Danger of fire due to large charge build up causing discharge in thunderstorm.
  • Tall buildings are earthed with metallic spike higher than highest point.
  • In a thunderstorm the spike provides safe conductive path to earth for charge. (Can also allow spike repels positive ions to neutralise the negatively charged cloud.)
    • Question 4

    Anti-static

     

    Rubbing two insulating materials together cause electrons to transfer from one to the other due to friction. However, they can also move along a conductor (an anti-static object). Otherwise a spark would be generated that can damage materials and equipment.

     

    QUESTION:

    Lenny works in a computer repair shop. While he inspects and repairs a computer he wears an anti-static wrist band (see picture). The wrist band is made from a material which conducts electric current.

    (a) Explain how the wrist band prevents the build up of static charge, and why this is important.

     

    CORRECT ANSWER
    EDDIE SAYS
    For full marks the answer should include information on:
  • Charge builds up due to friction.
  • Charge moves along conductor/wrist band.
  • Otherwise sparks generated could damage computer equipment.
    • Question 5

    Radioactive Radiation

     

    There are three types of radioactive radiation: alpha, beta and gamma.

    Alpha particles are emitted from the nucleus at high speeds. They lose some energy when they ionise an atom, so they have a short penetration distance. They are stopped by a few centimetres of air or a few millimetres of paper.

    Beta particles are much less ionising so penetrate much further. They can be stopped by a few millimetres of aluminium or by an even smaller thickness of lead.

    Gamma rays are even less ionising, they travel at the speed of light and do not have an electric charge. They are only partly stopped by a few centimetres of lead and can travel a few kilometres in the air. They need a very thick block of lead to be stopped or even better many metres of concrete.

     

    QUESTION:

    Betsy and Callum are investigating the radiation emitted from some radioactive rocks. They use a Geiger-Müller counter to detect the radiation, and they have some sheets of paper and aluminium foil.

     

    (a) Name the three types of radioactivity, they might find.

    (b) Describe an experiment they can do to find out which type of radiation is being emitted.

    CORRECT ANSWER
    EDDIE SAYS
    For full marks the answer should include information on:
  • The three types of radiation is alpha, beta, gamma (can be in symbol form).
  • Paper and aluminium foil can distinguish the types of radiation.
  • Explain what will be recorded.
  • How to make the experiment a fair test.
  • Correctly state the expected outcomes for each of the three types of radiation.
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