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Exam Style 6 Mark Questions Physics 2

This is a selection of exam style questions worth 6 marks each. They test physics knowledge combined with literacy skills, so spelling and grammar must be correct in order to gain full marks.

'Exam Style 6 Mark Questions Physics 2' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 4

Curriculum topic:  GCSE Practice Papers

Curriculum subtopic:  Physics

Difficulty level:  

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Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

This is a selection of Exam Style Questions worth 6 marks each. They test physics knowledge combined with literacy skills, so spelling and grammar must be correct in order to gain full marks.

Read the information on each question and type your answer in the text area provided without looking at the information for each question to really test yourself.

The topics covered are all Physics from the core, additional and some triple science topics. If you are doing triple science, this paper will help you with your Physics exam.

Even if your answer in terms of scientific knowledge is fully correct, you cannot gain full marks if your literacy is not good, so you must learn those spellings and make sure your grammar and syntax are excellent.

Long-sightedness

 

The diagram shows the structure of the human eye. To long-sighted people, distant objects are clear but near objects are not. This might be caused by the eye ball being too short or the lens not being thick or curved enough. The ciliary muscles are taut but the lens can't bend the light enough. 

Long sight can be corrected by wearing glasses with converging lenses. A converging lens refracts the rays more, so that they meet on the retina. An alternative is contact lenses, placed on the front of the cornea. Some are softer than others but all allow oxygen to permeate the eye. To prevent infections it is important that the lenses are cleaned regularly, although some are now disposable. 

Laser correction uses a finely controlled laser beam to reshape the front of the cornea. A laser can make precise incisions in tissue without damaging the surrounding area. By permanently altering the shape of the cornea, the point at which light rays meet inside they eye can be changed.

 

 

QUESTION:

An optician has a teenage patient who is slightly long-sighted. The optician explains that there are three common ways to correct long-sightedness:

  • Wearing glasses.
  • Wearing contact lenses which lie on the surface of the cornea.
  • Having laser treatment which burns away thin layers of the cornea.

 

(a) Compare these treatments and explain which treatment you would suggest to the patient, giving your reasons.

Palliative care

 

Cancer charities aim to improve the care for cancer sufferers by using data based on evidence. The units carry out research into palliative care treatments for cancer. This research includes many patients across the country being involved in various types of palliative care trials. The results of different projects are shared and the data gathered are used by researchers.
 
 
QUESTION:
 
(a) Explain why it is important to collect qualitative and quantitative data about different palliative treatments.

Momentum

 

Momentum is a vector and has both size and direction. Conservation of momentum can be used to calculate the speed of a car after its collision.

 

QUESTION:

A car is driving at 5 m/s. Its mass is 1000 kg. A van (mass 1500 kg) driving towards the car collides with it, and the car and van join together. They keep moving at 1 m/s in the original direction of the van.

(a) Give two features of momentum.

(b) Use your ideas of conservation of momentum to calculate the original velocity of the van.

Elastic Collisions

 

QUESTION:

A white billiard ball moving at 0.5 m/s collides elastically with a stationary yellow ball. The white ball stops after the collision. The mass of each ball is 0.16 kg.

(a) Use your ideas of elastic collisions to explain what happens to the yellow ball.

Stars

 

In the universe, there are billions (perhaps trillions!) of stars similar to our Sun. They are of different sizes; the Sun is a medium-sized star. All stars, including the Sun, will die one day. Their life cycle is at least a million years. The smallest stars are neutron stars, they are only around 20 km in diameter.

 

 

How are stars formed?

  • A star starts its life as a cloud of gas and dust; they are called nebula clouds.
  • Gravity pulls nebula clouds together, as a spinning ball of gas.
  • The gas ball is so compacted that it gets hot and starts to glow, forming a protostar. At the beginning, protostars glow but cannot be seen, because they are surrounded by dust.
  • After millions of years, the temperature in their core is so high that nuclear fusion (joining of hydrogen nuclei to form helium) takes place. This releases a massive amount of energy.
  • The star is now visible and remains so for millions of years if it is small, and even longer (billions of years) if it is a big star. A star like our Sun may live for around 10 billion years.
  • What happens at the end of a star's life depends on the size of the star.

 

How do stars die?

Medium-sized stars:

  • The core of a medium-sized star (like our Sun) will eventually contract, while the outer part will expand.
  • It changes colour from yellow to red and becomes a red giant. The Sun, for example, will become so big that it will cover Mercury and Venus and even reach Earth. Shells of gas thrown out from a red giant are called planetary nebula.
  • Nebula from the Sun will stretch to the edge of the Solar System.
  • The core of the original star shrinks to about the size of the Earth; it is very hot and shines brightly as a white dwarf.
  • It does not make any energy, so it cools down and becomes yellow and then red and then forms a black dwarf.

 

Large stars:

  • The core of massive stars contracts and the outer part expands forming a red supergiant, before it collapses, causing the whole star to explode and be thrown outwards.
  • This explosion is called supernova.
  • The remaining core is a neutron star.
  • The material thrown out collides with gas and dust in space and it is called supernova remnant.
  • More and more gas and dust merges with the remnant and eventually a new star is formed.
  • The core continues to collapse, becomes so dense and gravitational forces are so big that not even light can escape. It becomes a black hole.

 

 

QUESTION:

(a) Describe the life cycle of a star.

  • Question 1

Long-sightedness

 

The diagram shows the structure of the human eye. To long-sighted people, distant objects are clear but near objects are not. This might be caused by the eye ball being too short or the lens not being thick or curved enough. The ciliary muscles are taut but the lens can't bend the light enough. 

Long sight can be corrected by wearing glasses with converging lenses. A converging lens refracts the rays more, so that they meet on the retina. An alternative is contact lenses, placed on the front of the cornea. Some are softer than others but all allow oxygen to permeate the eye. To prevent infections it is important that the lenses are cleaned regularly, although some are now disposable. 

Laser correction uses a finely controlled laser beam to reshape the front of the cornea. A laser can make precise incisions in tissue without damaging the surrounding area. By permanently altering the shape of the cornea, the point at which light rays meet inside they eye can be changed.

 

 

QUESTION:

An optician has a teenage patient who is slightly long-sighted. The optician explains that there are three common ways to correct long-sightedness:

  • Wearing glasses.
  • Wearing contact lenses which lie on the surface of the cornea.
  • Having laser treatment which burns away thin layers of the cornea.

 

(a) Compare these treatments and explain which treatment you would suggest to the patient, giving your reasons.

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
For full marks the answer should include information on:
  • Explanation of at least one similarity between the treatments.
  • Disadvantages of each treatment.
  • Recommendation of one treatment.
  • Reasons for the decision, linked to the case study.
    • Question 2

    Palliative care

     

    Cancer charities aim to improve the care for cancer sufferers by using data based on evidence. The units carry out research into palliative care treatments for cancer. This research includes many patients across the country being involved in various types of palliative care trials. The results of different projects are shared and the data gathered are used by researchers.
     
     
    QUESTION:
     
    (a) Explain why it is important to collect qualitative and quantitative data about different palliative treatments.
    CORRECT ANSWER
    EDDIE SAYS
    Responses should show: • Explanation of what palliative care is (1 mark). • Understanding that there are different types of palliative care (1 mark). • Patients must have a good understanding of what the different types of palliative care entail (1 mark). • Doctors must be able to provide information and choose the best type of care for their patients (1 mark). • Patients and doctors will use data and information in different ways (1 mark). • Distinction between quantitative and qualitative data (1 mark).
    • Question 3

    Momentum

     

    Momentum is a vector and has both size and direction. Conservation of momentum can be used to calculate the speed of a car after its collision.

     

    QUESTION:

    A car is driving at 5 m/s. Its mass is 1000 kg. A van (mass 1500 kg) driving towards the car collides with it, and the car and van join together. They keep moving at 1 m/s in the original direction of the van.

    (a) Give two features of momentum.

    (b) Use your ideas of conservation of momentum to calculate the original velocity of the van.

    CORRECT ANSWER
    EDDIE SAYS
    For full marks the answer should include information on:
  • Momentum is a vector and has both size and direction.

  • Initial momentum of car = mv = 5000 kg m/s.
  • Final combined momentum = 2500 × –1 = –2500 kg m/s.
  • By the conservation of momentum:
  • Van’s initial momentum = –7500 kg m/s.
  • Van’s initial velocity = –7500/1500 = –5 m/s.
    • Question 4

    Elastic Collisions

     

    QUESTION:

    A white billiard ball moving at 0.5 m/s collides elastically with a stationary yellow ball. The white ball stops after the collision. The mass of each ball is 0.16 kg.

    (a) Use your ideas of elastic collisions to explain what happens to the yellow ball.

    CORRECT ANSWER
    EDDIE SAYS
    For full marks the answer should include information on:
  • Initial total KE of both balls = ½mv2 = 0.02 J.
  • Since the collision is elastic, this is equal to the final total KE of both balls.
  • Initial total momentum of both balls = mv = 0.08 kg m/s in the direction of the white ball's approach.
  • This is equal to the final total momentum of both balls.
  • Therefore the yellow ball moves off in the same direction with a velocity of 0.5 m/s.
    • Question 5

    Stars

     

    In the universe, there are billions (perhaps trillions!) of stars similar to our Sun. They are of different sizes; the Sun is a medium-sized star. All stars, including the Sun, will die one day. Their life cycle is at least a million years. The smallest stars are neutron stars, they are only around 20 km in diameter.

     

     

    How are stars formed?

    • A star starts its life as a cloud of gas and dust; they are called nebula clouds.
    • Gravity pulls nebula clouds together, as a spinning ball of gas.
    • The gas ball is so compacted that it gets hot and starts to glow, forming a protostar. At the beginning, protostars glow but cannot be seen, because they are surrounded by dust.
    • After millions of years, the temperature in their core is so high that nuclear fusion (joining of hydrogen nuclei to form helium) takes place. This releases a massive amount of energy.
    • The star is now visible and remains so for millions of years if it is small, and even longer (billions of years) if it is a big star. A star like our Sun may live for around 10 billion years.
    • What happens at the end of a star's life depends on the size of the star.

     

    How do stars die?

    Medium-sized stars:

    • The core of a medium-sized star (like our Sun) will eventually contract, while the outer part will expand.
    • It changes colour from yellow to red and becomes a red giant. The Sun, for example, will become so big that it will cover Mercury and Venus and even reach Earth. Shells of gas thrown out from a red giant are called planetary nebula.
    • Nebula from the Sun will stretch to the edge of the Solar System.
    • The core of the original star shrinks to about the size of the Earth; it is very hot and shines brightly as a white dwarf.
    • It does not make any energy, so it cools down and becomes yellow and then red and then forms a black dwarf.

     

    Large stars:

    • The core of massive stars contracts and the outer part expands forming a red supergiant, before it collapses, causing the whole star to explode and be thrown outwards.
    • This explosion is called supernova.
    • The remaining core is a neutron star.
    • The material thrown out collides with gas and dust in space and it is called supernova remnant.
    • More and more gas and dust merges with the remnant and eventually a new star is formed.
    • The core continues to collapse, becomes so dense and gravitational forces are so big that not even light can escape. It becomes a black hole.

     

     

    QUESTION:

    (a) Describe the life cycle of a star.

    CORRECT ANSWER
    EDDIE SAYS
    For full marks, the answer must describe the life cycle of stars of different sizes, so three different versions.
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