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Switch Words with Similar Spellings or Meanings

In this worksheet, students will find two words in a jumbled sentence which need to be swapped for the sentence to make sense.

'Switch Words with Similar Spellings or Meanings' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:  Verbal Reasoning

Curriculum subtopic:  Jumbled Sentences

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

Ready for your next challenge word detective?  

Some word trickster has been up to no good again, but this time they’ve been moving words!


 

In the sentence below someone has sneakily swapped two of the words around so that it doesn’t make sense anymore!
 

Look at the jumbled sentence below:

There were field cows grazing in the seven.

 

Can you work out which two words do not fit in with the sentence and have been swapped around?

 

Field and seven should be swapped for the sentence to make sense.

This would give us:

There were seven cows grazing in the field.

The sentence sounds much better now that the words have been swapped!

A cow

 

Now it’s your turn to track down the two words that have been sneakily swapped.

Good luck!


 

Pssstt!! Here’s a handy hint to help you reach superstar status:

First, read the sentence slowly and think about the topic of the sentence.

Then, think about which two words don’t quite fit in their place.

If you are finding it tricky,  it might help to write the sentence out on a sheet of paper after you have corrected it, so you can check the new sentence makes sense.

Look at this sentence:

 

Josie settled down on her pyjamas and switched in the television

 

It doesn't make sense because two of the words have swapped places.

Write the sentence with the words in their correct places.

 

Remember to put in a capital letter and full stop!

Look at this sentence:

 

Samuel eagerly asked whether could he attend the puppet show

 

It doesn't make sense because two of the words have swapped places.

Write the sentence with the words in their correct places.

 

Remember to put in a capital letter and full stop!

Look at this sentence:

 

a garden was filled with the vast array of flowers

 

It doesn't make sense because two of the words have swapped places.

Write the sentence with the words in their correct places.

 

Remember to put in a capital letter and full stop!

Look at this sentence:

 

my mouse quietly scurried along the floorboards of a kitchen

A grey mouse

It doesn't make sense because two of the words have swapped places.

Write the sentence with the words in their correct places.

 

Remember to put in a capital letter and full stop!

You see ... you're halfway there already!

 

Look at this sentence:

 

I managed to complete running laps around the five track

 

It doesn't make sense because two of the words have swapped places.

Write the sentence with the words in their correct places.

 

Remember to put in a capital letter and full stop!

Look at this sentence:

 

the builder used a drill to machine a sizable hole

 

It doesn't make sense because two of the words have swapped places.

Write the sentence with the words in their correct places.

 

Remember to put in a capital letter and full stop!

Look at this sentence:

 

Adam could not recall his upcoming date of the trip

 

It doesn't make sense because two of the words have swapped places.

Write the sentence with the words in their correct places.

 

Remember to put in a capital letter and full stop!

Look at this sentence:

 

Rosie and her mum trudged in school to the downpour

 

It doesn't make sense because two of the words have swapped places

Write the sentence with the words in their correct places.

 

Remember to put in capital letters and a full stop!

Look at this sentence:

 

dogs is both rewarding and challenging to care for it

Two dogs on an armchair

It doesn't make sense because two of the words have swapped places.

Write the sentence with the words in their correct places.

 

Remember to put in a capital letter and full stop!

And for your last question!

 

Look at this sentence:

 

I waited a considerable amount for time of the train

 

It doesn't make sense because two of the words have swapped places.

Write the sentence with the words in their correct places.

 

Remember to put in a capital letter and full stop!

  • Question 1

Look at this sentence:

 

Josie settled down on her pyjamas and switched in the television

 

It doesn't make sense because two of the words have swapped places.

Write the sentence with the words in their correct places.

 

Remember to put in a capital letter and full stop!

CORRECT ANSWER
Josie settled down in her pyjamas and switched on the television.
EDDIE SAYS
The words on and in have swapped places. Both of these words are prepositions, which show the relationship between a noun and another word in a sentence. In this case, the pyjamas and the television. Two very short words with very similar spellings have swapped places - sometimes the trickiest ones can be the shortest words!
  • Question 2

Look at this sentence:

 

Samuel eagerly asked whether could he attend the puppet show

 

It doesn't make sense because two of the words have swapped places.

Write the sentence with the words in their correct places.

 

Remember to put in a capital letter and full stop!

CORRECT ANSWER
Samuel eagerly asked whether he could attend the puppet show.
EDDIE SAYS
The words he and could have swapped places. You must remember your capital letter and full stop in these questions to be marked as correct. Accurate punctuation is a really important part of un-jumbling sentences!
  • Question 3

Look at this sentence:

 

a garden was filled with the vast array of flowers

 

It doesn't make sense because two of the words have swapped places.

Write the sentence with the words in their correct places.

 

Remember to put in a capital letter and full stop!

CORRECT ANSWER
The garden was filled with a vast array of flowers.
EDDIE SAYS
The words the and a have been swapped. Both of these are articles, but one is specific and one general. So here we must decide if the garden is specific or the flowers. Do you know the word array? It simply means an impressive show of something so, in this case, there must have been a large collection of different flowers that looked magnificent.
  • Question 4

Look at this sentence:

 

my mouse quietly scurried along the floorboards of a kitchen

A grey mouse

It doesn't make sense because two of the words have swapped places.

Write the sentence with the words in their correct places.

 

Remember to put in a capital letter and full stop!

CORRECT ANSWER
A mouse quietly scurried along the floorboards of my kitchen.
EDDIE SAYS
The words my and a have swapped places. The word a is a general article, whereas the word my indicates something which belongs to someone. Is a mouse or a kitchen most likely to belong to someone? Both are possible, but a kitchen always belongs to someone whilst mice can be pets or can live wild and not belong to anyone. You're doing really well so far, so don't give up!
  • Question 5

You see ... you're halfway there already!

 

Look at this sentence:

 

I managed to complete running laps around the five track

 

It doesn't make sense because two of the words have swapped places.

Write the sentence with the words in their correct places.

 

Remember to put in a capital letter and full stop!

CORRECT ANSWER
I managed to complete five laps around the running track.
EDDIE SAYS
The words running and five have swapped places. That sounds like an impressive run but it all depends on how long the running track is! You're doing great so far - halfway through this activity already!
  • Question 6

Look at this sentence:

 

the builder used a drill to machine a sizable hole

 

It doesn't make sense because two of the words have swapped places.

Write the sentence with the words in their correct places.

 

Remember to put in a capital letter and full stop!

CORRECT ANSWER
The builder used a machine to drill a sizable hole.
EDDIE SAYS
The words drill and machine have swapped places. This was tricky, wasn't it? This is because the word drill is being used as a noun in the jumbled sentence but as a verb in the new sentence. Confusing isn't it!
  • Question 7

Look at this sentence:

 

Adam could not recall his upcoming date of the trip

 

It doesn't make sense because two of the words have swapped places.

Write the sentence with the words in their correct places.

 

Remember to put in a capital letter and full stop!

CORRECT ANSWER
Adam could not recall the upcoming date of his trip.
EDDIE SAYS
The words the and his have swapped places. Which of the nouns implies ownership and which is general - trip or date? A trip can belong to someone (my trip, your trip, etc.) but a date usually cannot. Except for a birthday that is! Once again, those little words can cause problems!
  • Question 8

Look at this sentence:

 

Rosie and her mum trudged in school to the downpour

 

It doesn't make sense because two of the words have swapped places

Write the sentence with the words in their correct places.

 

Remember to put in capital letters and a full stop!

CORRECT ANSWER
Rosie and her mum trudged to school in the downpour.
EDDIE SAYS
The words in and to have swapped place. Both of these words are prepositions. To is used with destinations, we can go to the shops or to a city. What a wonderful word 'trudged' is! It gives a very clear picture of how miserable it was going to school in driving rain. It shows just how important it is to try to use powerful words in your own writing.
  • Question 9

Look at this sentence:

 

dogs is both rewarding and challenging to care for it

Two dogs on an armchair

It doesn't make sense because two of the words have swapped places.

Write the sentence with the words in their correct places.

 

Remember to put in a capital letter and full stop!

CORRECT ANSWER
It is both rewarding and challenging to care for dogs.
EDDIE SAYS
The words it and dogs have swapped places. Did you wonder about the word is after the plural word dogs? Dogs is a plural noun but is is a singular form of the verb to be. We would need to use are instead of is with a plural, this helps us spot that this word doesn't belong here. It is noticing these little things that will make you into a real word superstar!
  • Question 10

And for your last question!

 

Look at this sentence:

 

I waited a considerable amount for time of the train

 

It doesn't make sense because two of the words have swapped places.

Write the sentence with the words in their correct places.

 

Remember to put in a capital letter and full stop!

CORRECT ANSWER
I waited a considerable amount of time for the train.
EDDIE SAYS
The words for and of have swapped places. Both prepositions again, but with very different meanings! For is often used with times, which helps us to spot that this is not where it belongs in the sentence. That was the last question on this activity - are you ready for another challenge, word detective?
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