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Circuit Diagrams 1

In this worksheet, students will be helped to consolidate their understanding of circuit components, what symbols represent them in circuit diagrams and to practise their interpretation of how circuits work.

'Circuit Diagrams 1' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:   Electricity

Curriculum subtopic:   Circuit Diagrams and Symbols

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

When trying to convert a real circuit into a drawing, it would be really difficult to draw if we used a picture of each component like this:

 

 Circuit drawing

 

It would take ages and, after all, many of us are rubbish at drawing!

 

So a system of standard symbols was devised to makes things easier and clearer (yes, really - they do, once you've practised it!).

 

This worksheet takes you through these components because knowing them, understanding them and using them is vital and it really does get easier each time you do it... honest!

Here is a battery:

 

 Battery

 

Get used to calling it a CELL because the word "battery" really means several cells.

For example this battery contains four cells all linked together (rather like a gun battery):

 

6V battery

 

Which of the following symbols represents a cell?

 

 

A

B

C

D

E

What component does this symbol represent?

 

bulb

buzzer

motor

What component does this symbol represent?

 

switch

cell

battery

Which of the following symbols represents a buzzer?

 

A

B

C

Which of these switches is drawn so that electric current can pass through it?

 

A

B

C

What component does this symbol represent?

 

bulb

milliammeter

motor

Alex has constructed a circuit in which two cells light a bulb brightly.

 

He tries to draw the circuit and isn't sure which of these three is correct. Can you help him out?

 

A

B

C

Here are five circuits.

 

 

 

Tick the ones where the bulb will be OUT.

A

B

C

D

E

Alex was shown three circuits in which a motor is controlled by a switch.  He tried them out.

 

Circuit diagram 

 

Look at each circuit and decide in which ONE Alex found that the motor turned FASTEST.

A

B

C

Why will the bulb NOT light in this circuit when both switches are closed?

 

electricity cannot flow through two switches

the cells are opposite ways round

two cells are too powerful for one bulb

  • Question 1

Here is a battery:

 

 Battery

 

Get used to calling it a CELL because the word "battery" really means several cells.

For example this battery contains four cells all linked together (rather like a gun battery):

 

6V battery

 

Which of the following symbols represents a cell?

 

 

CORRECT ANSWER
B
EDDIE SAYS
A cell is represented by a long line (the positive terminal) and a short line (the negative terminal). You'll remember this quite easily as you'll get to use it a lot!
  • Question 2

What component does this symbol represent?

 

CORRECT ANSWER
bulb
EDDIE SAYS
A bulb (or lamp) is always a circle with a big X in the middle of it.
  • Question 3

What component does this symbol represent?

 

CORRECT ANSWER
battery
EDDIE SAYS
This component shows three cells joined together so that's a ..... yes, a battery (of 3 cells!).
  • Question 4

Which of the following symbols represents a buzzer?

 

CORRECT ANSWER
C
EDDIE SAYS
Think of it a bit like a drum sending out the sound - it's a little like a kettle drum shape - that's a buzzer.
  • Question 5

Which of these switches is drawn so that electric current can pass through it?

 

CORRECT ANSWER
B
EDDIE SAYS
A is an open switch (a gap, so no current) and C is an open push-button switch (also a gap) but B shows a closed switch which completes the conducting path.
  • Question 6

What component does this symbol represent?

 

CORRECT ANSWER
motor
EDDIE SAYS
A circle with an M in it? What else could it be ....?!
  • Question 7

Alex has constructed a circuit in which two cells light a bulb brightly.

 

He tries to draw the circuit and isn't sure which of these three is correct. Can you help him out?

 

CORRECT ANSWER
B
EDDIE SAYS
First off Alex needed two cells, so A is out as there's only one. In circuit C he's drawn the cells facing different ways, so that won't work (no current will flow), so B is correct: 2 cells to 1 bulb.
  • Question 8

Here are five circuits.

 

 

 

Tick the ones where the bulb will be OUT.

CORRECT ANSWER
B
C
D
E
EDDIE SAYS
Amazingly only A works! B has the cells facing different ways, C has an open switch (gap), D has a gap between the cells and E - now that's a tricky one: the line underneath represents a wire connecting both sides of the bulb and that's called a SHORT CIRCUIT. What happens is that all the current goes along that wire so that it doesn't have the difficulty of going through the bulb; result - the bulb receives no electricity, so it's out.
  • Question 9

Alex was shown three circuits in which a motor is controlled by a switch.  He tried them out.

 

Circuit diagram 

 

Look at each circuit and decide in which ONE Alex found that the motor turned FASTEST.

CORRECT ANSWER
A
EDDIE SAYS
Circuit A is the only one where the motor is connected directly to the cell. In both B and C it is in series with lamps, which will slow the current down. This will make the motor turn slower (slowest in B because there are 2 lamps). In circuit A there is no other resistance to the flow of the current, so the motor will whizz!
  • Question 10

Why will the bulb NOT light in this circuit when both switches are closed?

 

CORRECT ANSWER
the cells are opposite ways round
EDDIE SAYS
You'd think that if you close both switches there would be no gaps and so electric current could flow. Trouble is the two cells have been put facing in opposite directions, so no current will flow - the bulb stays off.
---- OR ----

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