The smart way to improve grades

Comprehensive & curriculum aligned

Affordable pricing from £10/month

Circuit Basics 1

This worksheet takes the student through some of the basic ideas in electric circuits to make sure they are happy with those concepts before they tackle some of the more challenging ideas in Y6.

'Circuit Basics 1' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:  Electricity

Curriculum subtopic:  Energy in Circuits

Difficulty level:  

down

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

We depend so much on electricity now - our lives would be unrecognisable without it: homes, cars, phones, games consoles - they all work on electricity. Understanding a little of what it is about is vital to living in the 21st century.

 

 

This worksheet reviews some of the basic concepts about electrical circuits and components, to make sure you have them nailed before moving on to more challenging questions.

The flow of electricity along a wire is called what?

wave

current

currant

Objects that allow electricity to pass along them are called what?

conductors

wires

insulators

Objects that allow electricity to pass along them are usually made out of what sort of material?

plastic

wire

metal

If something does not allow electricity through it, it is called a what?

conductor

resistor

insulator

Which of the following materials do not allow current through them (tick all the ones that don't)?

wooden spoon

silver spoon

plastic paperclip

paper cup

pencil lead

door key

Electricity can only flow around a circuit when the circuit is what?

complete

whole

on

Katy has built a circuit with a 1.5V cell (battery) and a bulb.

When she changed the 1.5V cell for a 3V one what do you think happened?

the bulb became brighter

the bulb went out

the bulb didn't change

So, Katy's circuit now has a 3V cell and a bulb.

Next she connects a motor next to the bulb (IN SERIES with it) so that it looks like this:

 

 

Which of the following possible results did Katy notice happening? (tick all you agree with)

the motor turned

the bulb was dimmer

the motor didn't work

the bulb was brighter

the bulb went out

Next Katy tried something different: she connected a buzzer to a cell and a switch:

 

 

When she closed the switch the buzzer made a noise. Why do you think it did?

the switch made electricity

the switch connected the buzzer and the cell together

the switch let electricity out of the buzzer

When Katy opened the switch in her circuit (from question 9) the buzzer stopped sounding.

What is the best explanation for this?

too much electricity was reaching the buzzer

the switch cannot make electricity any more

the circuit has been broken by opening the switch

the buzzer has broken

the cell has run out of charge

  • Question 1

The flow of electricity along a wire is called what?

CORRECT ANSWER
current
EDDIE SAYS
HaHa - tricky one to start off with! A currAnt is like a raisin/sultana and nice to eat. CurrEnt is all about flowing (think of a river current), whereas a wave is how things like sound travel (and you get them in the sea!).
  • Question 2

Objects that allow electricity to pass along them are called what?

CORRECT ANSWER
conductors
EDDIE SAYS
Conductors (you used to get them on buses and they still look after the orchestra!) are materials that allow electricity to flow through them. What sort of things are conductors? All will be revealed....
  • Question 3

Objects that allow electricity to pass along them are usually made out of what sort of material?

CORRECT ANSWER
metal
EDDIE SAYS
All metals conduct electricity - no exceptions (including mercury and that's a liquid metal!). Not a lot else does.
  • Question 4

If something does not allow electricity through it, it is called a what?

CORRECT ANSWER
insulator
EDDIE SAYS
Insulation can mean what goes in your loft to keep your house warm but in terms of electricity it means something that won't conduct. For example insulated wire is a copper wire covered in plastic so you cannot connect with the electricity. Insulating tape is sticky tape used to bind up electrical components so the electricity doesn't connect to you.
  • Question 5

Which of the following materials do not allow current through them (tick all the ones that don't)?

CORRECT ANSWER
wooden spoon
plastic paperclip
paper cup
EDDIE SAYS
Wood, plastic and paper are all insulators and don't conduct electric current. Silver spoons and door keys are made of metal (a good conductor) and well done if you knew that pencil lead (made of a type of carbon called GRAPHITE) is also a conductor (although not as good as a metal).
  • Question 6

Electricity can only flow around a circuit when the circuit is what?

CORRECT ANSWER
complete
EDDIE SAYS
A 'complete' circuit is one with no gaps in it - electric current can flow around it.
  • Question 7

Katy has built a circuit with a 1.5V cell (battery) and a bulb.

When she changed the 1.5V cell for a 3V one what do you think happened?

CORRECT ANSWER
the bulb became brighter
EDDIE SAYS
Twice as much voltage to the same bulb? That means twice as much 'PUSH' from the cell, so the current goes much faster. Result? The bulb is brighter.
  • Question 8

So, Katy's circuit now has a 3V cell and a bulb.

Next she connects a motor next to the bulb (IN SERIES with it) so that it looks like this:

 

 

Which of the following possible results did Katy notice happening? (tick all you agree with)

CORRECT ANSWER
the motor turned
the bulb was dimmer
EDDIE SAYS
All things being equal the circuit should have worked: the motor would turn but now the bulb would be receiving less current (as it's in series with the motor and they are 'sharing' the current) and so it would be dimmer.
  • Question 9

Next Katy tried something different: she connected a buzzer to a cell and a switch:

 

 

When she closed the switch the buzzer made a noise. Why do you think it did?

CORRECT ANSWER
the switch connected the buzzer and the cell together
EDDIE SAYS
In order to complete the circuit so there are no gaps Katy had to close the switch. Now the cell can push current around the entire circuit and so the buzzer sounds.
  • Question 10

When Katy opened the switch in her circuit (from question 9) the buzzer stopped sounding.

What is the best explanation for this?

CORRECT ANSWER
the circuit has been broken by opening the switch
EDDIE SAYS
While the buzzer might have broken and the cell might be flat, the most likely explanation for the buzzer's silence is that, when Katy opened the switch, she created a gap (of air) in the circuit. Electricity doesn't flow through air very well, so the circuit was broken and so the current stopped.
---- OR ----

Sign up for a £1 trial so you can track and measure your child's progress on this activity.

What is EdPlace?

We're your National Curriculum aligned online education content provider helping each child succeed in English, maths and science from year 1 to GCSE. With an EdPlace account you’ll be able to track and measure progress, helping each child achieve their best. We build confidence and attainment by personalising each child’s learning at a level that suits them.

Start your £1 trial

Start your trial for £1