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Light and Shadows 1

This worksheet helps the student to explore some of the basic ideas surrounding light, shadows and how we see objects.

'Light and Shadows 1' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:  Light

Curriculum subtopic:  Shadow Shapes

Difficulty level:  

down

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

 

Where does light come from? What happens when it hits things? How do we see things? These are the sorts of questions that we'll be exploring as you follow through this worksheet.

We are so lucky to be living on a world where there is light!

Light comes from lots of sources: the Sun, torches, flames, lightning, light bulbs and so on.

 

What do we call these sources of light?

bright

luminous

shining

Our eyes allow us to see things.

 

 

Which part of the eye allows light in so that we can see?

iris

pupil

cornea

Thousands of years ago the Egyptians wondered about how we see things.

They decided that we see things because our eyes produce light which lights things up so that we can see them.

 

 

 

Which of the following tests do you think could have disproved this theory?

they are unable to see anything in the dark

if they cannot see an object it isn't there

bright light makes them close their eyes

if they close their eyes is there light on the inside of their eyelids

if they close their eyes, can the other people in the room still see?

Chloe let her dog Blackie out into the garden after dark. When she went to get him in she couldn't see him. Chloe fetched a torch so she could find where Blackie had gone.

 

 

How was Chloe able to see Blackie with the torch?

the torchlight reflected off him to Chloe's eyes

the light travelling from Chloe's eyes reflected off Blackie

the torchlight reflected off Chloe's eyes and on to Blackie

If Chloe's dog Blackie had had white fur instead of black she would have been able to see him much more easily.

 

 

Why do you think that is?

because light from the eyes is absorbed better by black objects

because white surfaces reflect light better than black ones

because white objects give off more light

When light hits an object, like a lemon, the light bounces back from it.

 

 

This makes it __________ light.

 

Choose the word that makes the most sense in this sentence.

absorbed

reflected

coloured

When those light rays hit an object they bounce off in different directions, some to your eyes.

What does that create on the other side of the object, where the light was originally going?

a pool of light

a reflection

a shadow

Finish this sentence so that it makes sense:

"When it is dark...."

light reflects into our eyes so we cannot see things

no light bounces back into our eyes so we cannot see things

our eyes absorb any light so we cannot see things

How do "cat's eyes" on the road help drivers to see where the road goes at night?

 

light from the headlights reflects off them to the driver's eyes

they produce light that shines into the driver's eyes

light from them reflects off the car's headlights

Keiran thinks it's time to redecorate his bedroom. He wants it nice and light and bright.

 

Which one of the following colours would you advise him to use?

white

yellow

mint green

  • Question 1

We are so lucky to be living on a world where there is light!

Light comes from lots of sources: the Sun, torches, flames, lightning, light bulbs and so on.

 

What do we call these sources of light?

CORRECT ANSWER
luminous
EDDIE SAYS
Things that give out light are known as LUMINOUS SOURCES, from the Latin for light which is lumen.
  • Question 2

Our eyes allow us to see things.

 

 

Which part of the eye allows light in so that we can see?

CORRECT ANSWER
pupil
EDDIE SAYS
The PUPIL is the black part in the middle of the eye - in reality it's a hole (which changes in size) that lets light in so that messages can be sent to the brain. The iris is the coloured bit and the cornea is the transparent covering of the front of the eye.
  • Question 3

Thousands of years ago the Egyptians wondered about how we see things.

They decided that we see things because our eyes produce light which lights things up so that we can see them.

 

 

 

Which of the following tests do you think could have disproved this theory?

CORRECT ANSWER
they are unable to see anything in the dark
bright light makes them close their eyes
if they close their eyes is there light on the inside of their eyelids
EDDIE SAYS
It's a weird idea - eyes acting like torches! Surely they could see in the dark, then, as their eyes would light up the way ahead. Wouldn't there be light on their eyelids even when their eyes were closed? What about when they looked at the sun - it's so bright they had to close their eyes, so surely that would stop light coming out of them, yet the sun would still be bright? Weird!
  • Question 4

Chloe let her dog Blackie out into the garden after dark. When she went to get him in she couldn't see him. Chloe fetched a torch so she could find where Blackie had gone.

 

 

How was Chloe able to see Blackie with the torch?

CORRECT ANSWER
the torchlight reflected off him to Chloe's eyes
EDDIE SAYS
Lots of people find this difficult: many think that our eyes PRODUCE light when they don't - they RECEIVE light! Light, bouncing off objects, enters our eyes and electrical messages are sent along nerves to the brain to tell it what's going on.
  • Question 5

If Chloe's dog Blackie had had white fur instead of black she would have been able to see him much more easily.

 

 

Why do you think that is?

CORRECT ANSWER
because white surfaces reflect light better than black ones
EDDIE SAYS
Remembering that light comes TO our eyes, not from them, it's because white surfaces reflect more light; black surfaces tend to absorb more rays of light (that's why soldiers on night exercises black their faces to make them harder to see).
  • Question 6

When light hits an object, like a lemon, the light bounces back from it.

 

 

This makes it __________ light.

 

Choose the word that makes the most sense in this sentence.

CORRECT ANSWER
reflected
EDDIE SAYS
The reason you can see the object is that the rays of light bounce off it back to your eyes - so it's reflected.
  • Question 7

When those light rays hit an object they bounce off in different directions, some to your eyes.

What does that create on the other side of the object, where the light was originally going?

CORRECT ANSWER
a shadow
EDDIE SAYS
Think: if the light is bouncing (reflecting) off the object it cannot be getting through, so there's going to be an unlit area behind it - that's a shadow!
  • Question 8

Finish this sentence so that it makes sense:

"When it is dark...."

CORRECT ANSWER
no light bounces back into our eyes so we cannot see things
EDDIE SAYS
Darkness! That's when there's no luminous source producing light (ever been in a deep cave and turned the torch off?) and no matter how hard you LOOK you cannot see anything. That's because, without anything producing light to bounce (reflect) off things to your eyes, you cannot see anything!
  • Question 9

How do "cat's eyes" on the road help drivers to see where the road goes at night?

 

CORRECT ANSWER
light from the headlights reflects off them to the driver's eyes
EDDIE SAYS
Cat's eyes were invented in the 1930s to help drivers see where the road goes at night. They contain reflective glass or plastic that reflects light coming from the car's headlights back into the driver's eyes. Their name comes from the fact that real cats' eyes have a reflective membrane at the back of the eye which seems to shine brightly when light falls on it.
  • Question 10

Keiran thinks it's time to redecorate his bedroom. He wants it nice and light and bright.

 

Which one of the following colours would you advise him to use?

CORRECT ANSWER
white
EDDIE SAYS
Although it might seem a little stark, bright white paint will definitely give the lightest result. Still, he'll need to break it up with some posters and pictures to make it liveable!
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