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What is Blood?

In this worksheet, students will review their understanding of the structure and function of blood.

'What is Blood?' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:   Animals, including Humans

Curriculum subtopic:   Human Circulatory System

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

Amy and her brother, Sam, are playing in the local park. Sam brought his new hover toy to try out.

 

Hover board

 

It's difficult to control and Sam falls off, hurting his elbow.

 

"Ow! That hurts!", he cries.

 

"Are you OK?" asks Amy, as she helps him up. "Oh no, you've cut your elbow." Sam looked and saw the blood.

 

Child cut grazed elbow

 

"We'll need to clean you up and get a plaster on it," said Amy.

 

"Why's blood red?" Sam wanted to know.

 

"It contains iron, that's why", Amy explained.

 

"What? There's metal in my blood?" asked Sam.

 

"Come on, let's get you cleaned up," laughed Amy, "then we'll find out all about your blood."

Amy uses some damp cotton wool to clean up Sam's cut elbow. Parts of the cotton wool turn red with blood.

 

Cotton wool with blood

 

What was the name of the substance that Amy told Sam caused the blood to be red?

Iron

Brick

Copper

Cells

Why do you think we have blood in our bodies?

For the heart to pump

To keep us cool

To deliver food and oxygen

To keep us alive

The heart pumps blood around our bodies.

 

Heart

 

Write in the box below what the heart is mainly made of (remember, it has to squeeze the blood!).

Once Sam's elbow has been cleaned and protected with a plaster, he asks Amy, "what's blood made of?"

 

Amy suggests they have a look online at what blood is made of. She shows Sam this picture:

 

Red blood cells

 

"What are all those things that look like doughnuts?" Sam wanted to know.

 

What do you think they might be?

Doughnuts

Blood

Red blood cells

Iron particles

"Yes," said Sam, "but what's blood for?"

 

Tick as many of the following blood functions you think answer Sam's question.

Carrying food

Keeping us warm

Carrying information

Keeping us cool

Carrying oxygen

Carrying carbon dioxide

Fighting disease

Healing cuts and wounds

Sam was amazed at all the jobs blood seemed to do, "so, what's it made of?" he asked.

 

"Oh, loads of things," she replied. "Let's make up a list together and see what's in blood and what it's for."

 

Brother and sister working

 

See if you can match each of the parts of the blood to its function (job).

Column A

Column B

Red blood cells
fight disease/microbes
White blood cells
carry oxygen
Water
help to heal wounds by forming a clot
Platelets
dissolves chemicals to be carried around the body

"Is my blood everywhere in my body?" asked Sam.

 

"Well, kind of," answered Amy, "but it's carried in little tubes, all over your body."

 

Can you pick the odd-one-out that is not a blood vessel?

Artery

Capillary

Vain

Trachea

Next, Amy had a question for Sam.

 

"Sam, have you ever wondered why all the meat at the butcher's is red, no matter what animal it's come from?"

 

 

"Is that because all those animals have blood too?" suggested Sam.

 

Amy asked Sam to pick out from this list the one food that doesn't have blood in it. Which one do you think he (correctly) chose?

Salmon

Pork

Tomato

Beef mince

Chicken thigh

The main component of blood is a yellowish liquid called plasma (pronounced PLAZ-MUH).

 

Over 90% of the blood plasma is made of a certain liquid. What do you think that liquid is?

 

Type your answer into the box.

The blood plasma carries lots of dissolved chemicals all over the body.

 

Tick the three you think it probably transports.

Sugar

Heat

Carbon dioxide

Chemical messengers (hormones)

Microbiomes

Red blood cells

  • Question 1

Amy uses some damp cotton wool to clean up Sam's cut elbow. Parts of the cotton wool turn red with blood.

 

Cotton wool with blood

 

What was the name of the substance that Amy told Sam caused the blood to be red?

CORRECT ANSWER
Iron
EDDIE SAYS
Amy explained to Sam that it was iron that gave blood it's red colour. Maybe you've seen soil that's red - Devon is famous for it, and that's because there's iron ore in it. Iron is a vital component of our blood as it's what enables us to carry oxygen around our bodies (you'll learn more about how later on!).
  • Question 2

Why do you think we have blood in our bodies?

CORRECT ANSWER
To deliver food and oxygen
EDDIE SAYS
If you chose the option, "to keep us alive" it doesn't answer the question of what is blood actually for? The heart does pump it, but again it's not what blood is for. It can help to keep us cool (by taking heat to the surface of our skin) but the primary function of our blood is that it's our delivery system. Blood takes food and oxygen to where it's needed in our bodies and then takes waste (like carbon dioxide) away.
  • Question 3

The heart pumps blood around our bodies.

 

Heart

 

Write in the box below what the heart is mainly made of (remember, it has to squeeze the blood!).

CORRECT ANSWER
Muscle
Muscles
EDDIE SAYS
Reckon your main problem here was spelling muscle correctly! If you spelt it 'mussel', then that's a black, two-shelled shellfish you may have eaten with chips! If you find muscle hard to spell, say "MUS - KULL" as you write it. Anyway, the heart is mostly muscle which contracts to squeeze the blood and move it around the body. You can feel this squeezing motion when you locate your pulse - that's the push of the heart muscle that pumps the blood around.
  • Question 4

Once Sam's elbow has been cleaned and protected with a plaster, he asks Amy, "what's blood made of?"

 

Amy suggests they have a look online at what blood is made of. She shows Sam this picture:

 

Red blood cells

 

"What are all those things that look like doughnuts?" Sam wanted to know.

 

What do you think they might be?

CORRECT ANSWER
Red blood cells
EDDIE SAYS
In fact, those doughnut-shaped objects are our red blood cells and they are the things that contain iron and carry oxygen around our bodies. Kinda vital, wouldn't you say? You'll find out why they are that funny shape and where they are made later on in your science course.
  • Question 5

"Yes," said Sam, "but what's blood for?"

 

Tick as many of the following blood functions you think answer Sam's question.

CORRECT ANSWER
Carrying food
Keeping us warm
Carrying information
Keeping us cool
Carrying oxygen
Carrying carbon dioxide
Fighting disease
Healing cuts and wounds
EDDIE SAYS
Well, really - they're all right! Who'd have thought it? You might have expected to carry food and oxygen, maybe healing cuts and wounds, maybe fighting disease (that's the white blood cells), but amazingly blood also carries information (chemicals called hormones are released into the blood, like Growth Hormones which makes your body grow). In additon, waste carbon dioxide is dissolved in the blood to be breathed out and if we're too hot, blood is taken near to the skin surface to lose heat. On the other hand, if we're getting cold, warm blood from the centre of the body can be used to warm cold toes up! Blood is truly incredible stuff!
  • Question 6

Sam was amazed at all the jobs blood seemed to do, "so, what's it made of?" he asked.

 

"Oh, loads of things," she replied. "Let's make up a list together and see what's in blood and what it's for."

 

Brother and sister working

 

See if you can match each of the parts of the blood to its function (job).

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

Red blood cells
carry oxygen
White blood cells
fight disease/microbes
Water
dissolves chemicals to be carried...
Platelets
help to heal wounds by forming a ...
EDDIE SAYS
How many of these did you know? You may have known that oxygen is carried by the red blood cells and that white blood cells defend our bodies. However, when you get a question on something like 'platelets', that maybe you've never seen before, leave that till last. Complete the answers you know first, as that means you've got a better chance of nailing the right answer when you get to the ones you're unsure of. You know it makes sense! By the way, the water in blood is mainly composed of masses of things like nutrients and so on dissolved in it.
  • Question 7

"Is my blood everywhere in my body?" asked Sam.

 

"Well, kind of," answered Amy, "but it's carried in little tubes, all over your body."

 

Can you pick the odd-one-out that is not a blood vessel?

CORRECT ANSWER
Trachea
EDDIE SAYS
As you may already know, arteries are the big blood vessels which carry blood away from the heart while the veins bring blood back to the heart. The capillaries are the tiny blood vessels (you could fit 10 inside one of your strands of hair!) that supply all your cells. The trachea is often called your windpipe - it's the tube leading from your mouth to your lungs.
  • Question 8

Next, Amy had a question for Sam.

 

"Sam, have you ever wondered why all the meat at the butcher's is red, no matter what animal it's come from?"

 

 

"Is that because all those animals have blood too?" suggested Sam.

 

Amy asked Sam to pick out from this list the one food that doesn't have blood in it. Which one do you think he (correctly) chose?

CORRECT ANSWER
Tomato
EDDIE SAYS
Tomatoes might be red and juicy, but they don't contain blood! Tomatoes are fruit and contain seeds. When we eat meat, we're generally eating the muscle of the animal (even fish, like salmon) and they all contain blood (or, at least, they did!).
  • Question 9

The main component of blood is a yellowish liquid called plasma (pronounced PLAZ-MUH).

 

Over 90% of the blood plasma is made of a certain liquid. What do you think that liquid is?

 

Type your answer into the box.

CORRECT ANSWER
water
EDDIE SAYS
Yes, as you may know, we're about 70% water, so it makes sense that our blood is mainly water too. It dissolves masses and masses of different chemicals to then carry them around the body: carbon dioxide, hormones, nutrients, etc. By the way, if you spelt it 'warter', bad luck - right science, wrong spelling. Learn that there are no warts in water!
  • Question 10

The blood plasma carries lots of dissolved chemicals all over the body.

 

Tick the three you think it probably transports.

CORRECT ANSWER
Sugar
Carbon dioxide
Chemical messengers (hormones)
EDDIE SAYS
Remember the question? It was about dissolved chemicals, so if you put something like red blood cells, they're in the blood but not dissolved. Sugar gives us energy and needs to be delivered to working cells then, the waste carbon dioxide made is dissolved in the plasma to then be carried to the lungs. Hormones are released into the blood to give instructions: the hormone adrenaline says, "Get ready to run!"
---- OR ----

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