The smart way to improve grades

Comprehensive & curriculum aligned

Affordable pricing from £10/month

Connect 2D Shapes

In this worksheet, students will join simple 2D shapes together to make a compound shape. They will identify the matching shape from a selection.

'Connect 2D Shapes ' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:   Spatial and Non-Verbal Reasoning

Curriculum subtopic:   Joining 2D Shapes

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

Prepare to be a 2D shape builder!

 

Look at the shapes below:

 

 

In this question type, we need to join these two shapes together to make a new shape.

 

Matching letters have to touch, so, in this example, both the sides labelled a have to be touching each other.

 

Which of the following options would the new shape look like?

 

a)         b)         c) 

 

Did you choose option a?

If so, then you are correct!

 

The triangle lifts to go on top of the square.

Try and imagine the shapes moving together in your head.


 

 

Let’s try another one!

 

This time we have three shapes to join together.

Remember that matching letters must touch each other.

 

 

Here are the possible options:

 

a)         b)         c) 

 

The correct answer is c.

The triangle goes to the right of the rectangle, and the trapezium goes on top of the rectangle.


 

 

It’s now your turn to join shapes together.

 

Good luck 2D shape builder!

 

Hi there, 2D shape builder!

We're glad you're here to help us put the 2D shapes in this activity together in their correct positions. 

 

Look at these two shapes:

 

 

We need to join these two shapes together to make a new, combined shape. 

 

Sides with matching letters have to touch. 

This means that both the sides labelled a have to be touching each other. 

 

Once the shapes have been joined together, where will the square be? 

On the top

On the right

On the left

On the bottom

Right detective, it's time for the building to begin now. 

 

Look at these two shapes from the previous question again:

 

 

What will these shapes look like once they've been joined together? 

 

Remember that both the sides labelled a must be touching each other




Look at these two shapes from the previous questions one more time:

 

 

Why are the other two options incorrect? 

 

Match each option to the best reason why it is not the correct answer. 

Column A

Column B

');" onmouseout="tooltip.hide();">a)
The square has joined with the side labelled b, ra...
');" onmouseout="tooltip.hide();">b)
The square is inside the hexagon, rather than unde...

Here's a new pair of sneaky 2D shapes to consider in this case. 

 

Look at these two shapes:

 

 

We need to join these two shapes together to make a new, combined shape. 

 

Sides with matching letters have to touch. 

 

Once the shapes have been joined together, where will the rectangle be? 

On the top

On the right

On the bottom

On the left

Right detective, it's time for the building to begin again. 

 

Look at these two shapes from the previous question:

 

 

What will these shapes look like once they've been joined together? 

 

Remember that both the sides labelled a must be touching each other




Look at these two shapes from the previous questions one more time:

 

 

Why are the other two options incorrect? 

 

Match each option to the best reason why it is not the correct answer. 

Column A

Column B

');" onmouseout="tooltip.hide();">b) <...
The rectangle is a different size to the original ...
');" onmouseout="tooltip.hide();">c) <...
The rectangle has joined with the side labelled b,...

Look at these two new shapes:

 

 

We need to join these two shapes together to make a new, combined shape. 

 

Once the shapes have been joined together, where will the pentagon be? 

On the top

On the left

On the bottom

On the right

Right detective, it's time for the building to continue... 

 

Look at these two shapes from the previous question again:

 

 

What will these shapes look like once they've been joined together? 




Look at these two shapes from the previous questions one more time:

 

 

Why are the other two options incorrect? 

 

Match each option to the best reason why it is not the correct answer. 

Column A

Column B

');" onmouseout="tooltip.hide();">a)
The trapezium element has been swapped for a recta...
');" onmouseout="tooltip.hide();">c)
The trapezium is on top of the pentagon, rather th...

Here's your final challenge, detective!

 

Look at this new pair of shapes:

 

 

 

What will these shapes look like once they've been joined together? 




  • Question 1

Hi there, 2D shape builder!

We're glad you're here to help us put the 2D shapes in this activity together in their correct positions. 

 

Look at these two shapes:

 

 

We need to join these two shapes together to make a new, combined shape. 

 

Sides with matching letters have to touch. 

This means that both the sides labelled a have to be touching each other. 

 

Once the shapes have been joined together, where will the square be? 

CORRECT ANSWER
On the bottom
EDDIE SAYS
How did you get on with this first challenge, 2D builder? The top side of the square is labelled a and this needs to join with the bottom side of the hexagon. This means that the square has to move underneath the hexagon, so it will be on the bottom. The same letters always have to touch so don't be fooled by the sneak letter b added in there! This is a red herring which is trying to distract you, so don't let it, detective! Remember this important fact to help you track down the new shape in the next mystery...
  • Question 2

Right detective, it's time for the building to begin now. 

 

Look at these two shapes from the previous question again:

 

 

What will these shapes look like once they've been joined together? 

 

Remember that both the sides labelled a must be touching each other

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
As we noted in the previous question, the square must move underneath the hexagon so that the two sides labelled a are touching. This makes option c the correct answer. Can you imagine the hexagon moving on top of the square as a mini-animation in your head?
  • Question 3

Look at these two shapes from the previous questions one more time:

 

 

Why are the other two options incorrect? 

 

Match each option to the best reason why it is not the correct answer. 

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

');" onmouseout="tooltip.hide();">a)
The square is inside the hexagon,...
');" onmouseout="tooltip.hide();">b)
The square has joined with the si...
EDDIE SAYS
To be excellent 2D shape detectives, we need to be able to identify incorrect options just as easily as correct ones. Did you notice that in option a the square is inside the hexagon? This means that none of the labelled sides have joined, so it definitely cannot be correct. In option b, the square's side labelled a has joined with the side of the hexagon labelled b, so this is also a red herring. Great detective work for spotting those possible mistakes!
  • Question 4

Here's a new pair of sneaky 2D shapes to consider in this case. 

 

Look at these two shapes:

 

 

We need to join these two shapes together to make a new, combined shape. 

 

Sides with matching letters have to touch. 

 

Once the shapes have been joined together, where will the rectangle be? 

CORRECT ANSWER
On the bottom
EDDIE SAYS
The top side of the rectangle is labelled a as is the bottom side of the trapezium, so both these sides need to touch. This means that the rectangle has to move underneath the trapezium, so the rectangle will be on the bottom. Remember that the same letters have to join, so don't get caught out by that tricky letter b trying to lead you astray! Did you know that the shape here is called a trapezium? This term refers to a four-sided shape with one pair of parallel lines. Look out for these shapes in your future cases, detective.
  • Question 5

Right detective, it's time for the building to begin again. 

 

Look at these two shapes from the previous question:

 

 

What will these shapes look like once they've been joined together? 

 

Remember that both the sides labelled a must be touching each other

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
As the letter a is on the bottom edge of the trapezium, it will need to jump on top of the rectangle to join with the other side labelled a. This makes option a the correct answer. Move onto your next mission to think deeply about why you identified option a as your prime suspect...
  • Question 6

Look at these two shapes from the previous questions one more time:

 

 

Why are the other two options incorrect? 

 

Match each option to the best reason why it is not the correct answer. 

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

');" onmouseout="tooltip.hide();">b)
The rectangle has joined with the...
');" onmouseout="tooltip.hide();">c)
The rectangle is a different size...
EDDIE SAYS
Were you able to identify why these shape options were incorrect? In option b, the rectangle has moved above the trapezium rather than below it, so the sides labelled a and b have been joined instead. Can you see how the rectangle in option c is much thinner than the original rectangle shown in the question? This means that option c cannot be correct, as it uses the wrong shapes even if they are in the correct position. Keep up the great work in your next case, shape detective.
  • Question 7

Look at these two new shapes:

 

 

We need to join these two shapes together to make a new, combined shape. 

 

Once the shapes have been joined together, where will the pentagon be? 

CORRECT ANSWER
On the top
EDDIE SAYS
Here we have a pentagon and a trapezium to work with. We need to imagine joining both these shapes together, so that the sides labelled a are touching. The top side of the trapezium would move underneath the pentagon to join with its bottom edge. This means that the pentagon would end up on the top. Keep your detective's eyes peeled to find out what these shapes will look like after they have been joined in our next challenge...
  • Question 8

Right detective, it's time for the building to continue... 

 

Look at these two shapes from the previous question again:

 

 

What will these shapes look like once they've been joined together? 

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
In the last question, we deduced that the pentagon will be positioned on the top, which rules out option a immediately. At a glance, both options b and c may look correct, but look carefully at the lower shape in each case. Can you spy that one shape is actually a rectangle? This means that option b must be the correct answer. Let's move onto the next stage of this case to think more about our eliminated suspects to check they are truly off the hook...
  • Question 9

Look at these two shapes from the previous questions one more time:

 

 

Why are the other two options incorrect? 

 

Match each option to the best reason why it is not the correct answer. 

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

');" onmouseout="tooltip.hide();">a)
The trapezium is on top of the pe...
');" onmouseout="tooltip.hide();">c)
The trapezium element has been sw...
EDDIE SAYS
In option a, the trapezium is on the top rather than the bottom, so the sides labelled a are not touching. In option c, the lower shape has sneakily been swapped. Look carefully with your detective's magnifying glass to spot sneaky switches like this. Just one more case to crack now!
  • Question 10

Here's your final challenge, detective!

 

Look at this new pair of shapes:

 

 

 

What will these shapes look like once they've been joined together? 

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Here we have a triangle and a rectangle present, and we need to join both the sides labelled with the letter a. This means that the left-hand edge of the triangle will join with the right-hand edge of the rectangle. This makes option c the correct answer. Congratulations on completing this activity, 2D shape builder! Now you can join regular shapes by matching sides with the same letter, and ignoring other labelled sides which have been added as a distraction - well done!
---- OR ----

Sign up for a £1 trial so you can track and measure your child's progress on this activity.

What is EdPlace?

We're your National Curriculum aligned online education content provider helping each child succeed in English, maths and science from year 1 to GCSE. With an EdPlace account you’ll be able to track and measure progress, helping each child achieve their best. We build confidence and attainment by personalising each child’s learning at a level that suits them.

Get started
laptop

Start your £1 trial today.
Subscribe from £10/month.