The smart way to improve grades

Comprehensive & curriculum aligned

Affordable pricing from £10/month

Build Compound Words (Including Different Pronunciations)

In this worksheet, students will make compound words by choosing two smaller words that join together to make a longer word. They will learn to find words which are pronounced differently to the separate word components.

'Build Compound Words (Including Different Pronunciations)' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:  Verbal Reasoning

Curriculum subtopic:  Compound Words

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

What do we have here word detective?  

Can you help us solve this challenge?


 

What do the words below have in common?


 

blueberries                                         a field of buttercups                                              a pile of pancakes

     blueberries                                                    buttercup                                                          pancakes


 

They are all made up of two smaller words.


These words are called compound words and are made when smaller words join together to make a longer word.

blue + berries = blueberries

butter + cup = buttercup

pan + cakes = pancakes


 

These words were quick to find as we can hear the two separate words clearly when we say the long word.


 

Can you find the two words that make up the following word?

legend


 

Did you find leg and end?

These were more challenging to find as we pronounce the word leg differently in legend.


 

Which of the following words could you add to the word act to make a compound word?

and - this would make actand

or - this would make actor

either -  this would make acteither

The correct answer is or, as act + or = actor.

 



In this activity, you will need to be a legend (compound word alert!) and find two words that join together to make a longer word.

Let’s get started!

Underline ALL of the compound words in the sentence below.

 

a robber with a sack

 

The outlaw was hiding in the undergrowth.

Underline ALL of the compound words in the sentence below.

 

The swordfish at the restaurant was a bargain!

Type in the two separate words which make the compound word below.

Make sure you write the words in the correct order to be marked correctly. ​​

 

suitcase

 a brown suitcase covered with stickers

The swordfish at the restaurant was a bargain!

Type in the two separate words which make the compound word below.

Make sure you write the words in the correct order to be marked correctly.  ​

 

bean

some runner beans

The swordfish at the restaurant was a bargain!

Type in the two separate words which make the compound word below.

Make sure you write the words in the correct order to be marked correctly. ​

 

restring

a ball of string

 

The swordfish at the restaurant was a bargain!

Which of the following words could you add before the word rust to make a compound word?

 

a rusty piece of metal

sky

mist

sea

lay

Which of the following words could you add before the word pies to make a compound word?

 

a broken mince pie

pop

frame

vase

rain

Which of the following words could you add before the word pan to make a compound word?

 

 a saucepan

man

end

bag

sauce

Match up the words below to make compound words.

 

Column A

Column B

out
case
under
fish
sword
an
be
law
suit
growth

Match the words below to make compound words.

Column A

Column B

water
rust
rest
pan
mist
ring
pop
pies
sauce
fall
  • Question 1

Underline ALL of the compound words in the sentence below.

 

a robber with a sack

 

CORRECT ANSWER
The outlaw was hiding in the undergrowth.
EDDIE SAYS
There were two compound words in this sentence: outlaw and undergrowth. Out + law = outlaw An outlaw is a person who has broken the law - probably the most famous outlaw is Robin Hood - if you haven't heard of him, then I suggest you look him up on the internet. Under + growth = undergrowth The undergrowth is the higher area of plants underneath the trees - a terrific hiding place if you are a tiger waiting to catch your dinner.
  • Question 2

Underline ALL of the compound words in the sentence below.

 

CORRECT ANSWER
The swordfish at the restaurant was a bargain!
EDDIE SAYS
There were two compound words in this sentence: swordfish and bargain. Sword + fish = swordfish Bar + gain = bargain (a really good price!) This one is a bit more tricky because the letters 'gain' don't sound exactly the same as the word gain.
  • Question 3

Type in the two separate words which make the compound word below.

Make sure you write the words in the correct order to be marked correctly. ​​

 

suitcase

 a brown suitcase covered with stickers

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
The compound word suitcase is made up of the words suit and case. Remember to type the words in the order that they appear in the word. On to the next one ...
  • Question 4

Type in the two separate words which make the compound word below.

Make sure you write the words in the correct order to be marked correctly.  ​

 

bean

some runner beans

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
The compound word bean is made up of the words be and an. The word bean sounds very different to the two separate words that make it up. You have to look at the word carefully to help you see the separate words. Did you spot them?
  • Question 5

Type in the two separate words which make the compound word below.

Make sure you write the words in the correct order to be marked correctly. ​

 

restring

a ball of string

 

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
This was a hard one, wasn't it? The best way to find these tricky words is to try writing them out and then it is easier to see if you have made some real words.
You could try splitting it 're' and 'string' but you can see that this is incorrect because, although string is a real word, the prefix 're' is not a word.
This leaves you with the only other option of rest and ring, even though they sound completely different to the word restring.
Restring means to put new thread into something, like a necklace or guitar.
Well done if you got this one word detective!
  • Question 6

Which of the following words could you add before the word rust to make a compound word?

 

a rusty piece of metal

CORRECT ANSWER
mist
EDDIE SAYS
This is another tricky one which really needs to be written down rather than said aloud. The compound word is mistrust. If you mistrust somebody you don't trust them. Mist + rust = mistrust Great work, if you got this one!
  • Question 7

Which of the following words could you add before the word pies to make a compound word?

 

a broken mince pie

CORRECT ANSWER
pop
EDDIE SAYS
Another one where it is easier if you write down all the options first. If you do this, you end up with: Pop + pies = poppies , which is a REAL word! The other options don't work: Frame + pies = framepies - NO. Vase + pies = vasepies - WRONG. Rain + pies = rainpies - WRONG again. So the compound word is poppies, even though it sounds very different to the two separate words.
  • Question 8

Which of the following words could you add before the word pan to make a compound word?

 

 a saucepan

CORRECT ANSWER
sauce
EDDIE SAYS
Slightly easier this one - at last! The compound word is saucepan. Sauce + pan = saucepan.
  • Question 9

Match up the words below to make compound words.

 

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

out
law
under
growth
sword
fish
be
an
suit
case
EDDIE SAYS
Did you get all these matching pairs? The correct answers are: Out + law = outlaw Under + growth = undergrowth Sword + fish = swordfish Be + an = bean Suit + case = suitcase
  • Question 10

Match the words below to make compound words.

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

water
fall
rest
ring
mist
rust
pop
pies
sauce
pan
EDDIE SAYS
The final question - did you get it right?! Here are the correct pairs: Water + fall = waterfall Rest + ring = restring Mist + rust = mistrust Pop + pies = poppies Sauce + pan = saucepan Hopefully, you are a real star at recognising compound words now!
---- OR ----

Sign up for a £1 trial so you can track and measure your child's progress on this activity.

What is EdPlace?

We're your National Curriculum aligned online education content provider helping each child succeed in English, maths and science from year 1 to GCSE. With an EdPlace account you’ll be able to track and measure progress, helping each child achieve their best. We build confidence and attainment by personalising each child’s learning at a level that suits them.

Get started
laptop

Start your £1 trial today.
Subscribe from £10/month.