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Investigate Prepositions 3

In this worksheet, students consider the effect of changing the word order of sentences with prepositions.

'Investigate Prepositions 3' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:   English

Curriculum subtopic:   Grammar: Pronouns, Prepositions & Conjunctions

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

Prepositions are usually followed by a noun or a noun phrase.

Kate's birthday is in the middle of January.

Josie was hiding behind the curtains.

They travelled by car.

 

The preposition and the noun phrase together are called the prepositional phrase.

preposition + noun phrase = prepositional phrase

 

There was a playground next to the school.

The dragon flew over the hills, breathing fire dejectedly.

 

Sometimes the word order of a sentence can be changed so that the sentence starts with the prepositional phrase.

Next to the school there was a playground.

Over the hills flew the dragon, breathing fire dejectedly.

 

Changing word order in this way can make writing more varied and interesting, but it doesn't work for all prepositional phrases.

Jane played with Chloe.

With Chloe Jane played.      This doesn't work!

Read the following sentence and decide whether it makes sense if the prepositional phrase is moved to the beginning.

 

Andrea lay awake worrying for two hours.

makes sense

doesn't make sense

Read the following sentence and decide whether it makes sense if the prepositional phrase is moved to the beginning.

 

We went to the zoo by car.

makes sense

doesn't make sense

Read the following sentence and decide whether it makes sense if the prepositional phrase is moved to the beginning.

 

You must wash your hands before dinner.

makes sense

doesn't make sense

Read the following sentence and decide whether it makes sense if the prepositional phrase is moved to the beginning.

 

My dad is coming home in February.

makes sense

doesn't make sense

Read the following sentence and decide whether it makes sense if the prepositional phrase is moved to the beginning.

 

There was a fairy ring at the bottom of the garden.

makes sense

doesn't make sense

Rewrite the following sentence, beginning with the prepositional phrase.

 

Liam goes to football training on Thursday nights.

Rewrite the following sentence, beginning with the prepositional phrase.

 

A princess was locked up inside the giant's tower.

Rewrite the following sentence, beginning with the prepositional phrase.

 

The window shattered with an almighty crash.

Rewrite the following sentence, beginning with the prepositional phrase.

 

She remained shut up in her room throughout the long, dark winter.

Rewrite the following sentence, beginning with the prepositional phrase.

 

There was a strange creature hiding at the bottom of the lake.

  • Question 1

Read the following sentence and decide whether it makes sense if the prepositional phrase is moved to the beginning.

 

Andrea lay awake worrying for two hours.

CORRECT ANSWER
makes sense
EDDIE SAYS
\'For two hours Andrea lay awake worrying\' does make sense. Starting with the prepositional phrase highlights the length of time she lay awake.
  • Question 2

Read the following sentence and decide whether it makes sense if the prepositional phrase is moved to the beginning.

 

We went to the zoo by car.

CORRECT ANSWER
doesn\'t make sense
  • Question 3

Read the following sentence and decide whether it makes sense if the prepositional phrase is moved to the beginning.

 

You must wash your hands before dinner.

CORRECT ANSWER
makes sense
  • Question 4

Read the following sentence and decide whether it makes sense if the prepositional phrase is moved to the beginning.

 

My dad is coming home in February.

CORRECT ANSWER
makes sense
EDDIE SAYS
If you say \'In February my dad is coming home\' it emphasises when he is coming.
  • Question 5

Read the following sentence and decide whether it makes sense if the prepositional phrase is moved to the beginning.

 

There was a fairy ring at the bottom of the garden.

CORRECT ANSWER
makes sense
EDDIE SAYS
Starting the sentence with \'At the bottom of the garden...\' has the effect of building up anticipation, particularly in stories for younger children.
  • Question 6

Rewrite the following sentence, beginning with the prepositional phrase.

 

Liam goes to football training on Thursday nights.

CORRECT ANSWER
On Thursday nights Liam goes to football training.
On Thursday nights, Liam goes to football training.
EDDIE SAYS
Some prefer to add a comma after the prepositional phrase when it introduces a \'scene\' setting.
  • Question 7

Rewrite the following sentence, beginning with the prepositional phrase.

 

A princess was locked up inside the giant's tower.

CORRECT ANSWER
Inside the giant's tower a princess was locked up.
Inside the giant's tower, a princess was locked up.
  • Question 8

Rewrite the following sentence, beginning with the prepositional phrase.

 

The window shattered with an almighty crash.

CORRECT ANSWER
With an almighty crash the window shattered.
With an almighty crash, the window shattered.
  • Question 9

Rewrite the following sentence, beginning with the prepositional phrase.

 

She remained shut up in her room throughout the long, dark winter.

CORRECT ANSWER
Throughout the long, dark winter she remained shut up in her room.
Throughout the long, dark winter, she remained shut up in her room.
  • Question 10

Rewrite the following sentence, beginning with the prepositional phrase.

 

There was a strange creature hiding at the bottom of the lake.

CORRECT ANSWER
At the bottom of the lake there was a strange creature hiding.
At the bottom of the lake, there was a strange creature hiding.
---- OR ----

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