The smart way to improve grades

Comprehensive & curriculum aligned

Affordable pricing from £10/month

Respond to a Description of a Setting - The Secret Garden

In this worksheet, students imagine they are Mary from 'The Secret Garden' and write an account of the first time they saw the garden. The worksheet should be attempted after the student has completed the reading comprehension worksheet on 'The Secret Garden'.

'Respond to a Description of a Setting - The Secret Garden' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:   Writing: Composition

Curriculum subtopic:   Create Fiction

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

In The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett, Mary is a bad-tempered and lonely child who begins to change when she discovers a secret, neglected garden and starts caring for it.

 

This is the description of the garden as it was when Mary found it.

 

 

It was the sweetest, most mysterious-looking place any one could imagine. The high walls which shut it in were covered with the leafless stems of climbing roses which were so thick that they were matted together. Mary Lennox knew they were roses because she had seen a great many roses in India. All the ground was covered with grass of a wintry brown and out of it grew clumps of bushes which were surely rosebushes if they were alive. There were numbers of standard roses which had so spread their branches that they were like little trees. There were other trees in the garden, and one of the things which made the place look strangest and loveliest was that climbing roses had run all over them and swung down long tendrils which made light swaying curtains, and here and there they had caught at each other or at a far-reaching branch and had crept from one tree to another and made lovely bridges of themselves. There were neither leaves nor roses on them now and Mary did not know whether they were dead or alive, but their thin grey or brown branches and sprays looked like a sort of hazy mantle spreading over everything, walls, and trees, and even brown grass, where they had fallen from their fastenings and run along the ground. It was this hazy tangle from tree to tree which made it all look so mysterious. Mary had thought it must be different from other gardens which had not been left all by themselves so long; and indeed it was different from any other place she had ever seen in her life.

"How still it is!" she whispered. "How still!"

 

In this activity, you are going to imagine that you are Mary and write an account of the day you found the garden. Remember that you can look back at this description as often as you like by clicking the Help button.

Imagine that Mary kept a diary of her new life in England. What would she have written on the day she discovered the secret garden?

 

You might want to jot some ideas down before you start. Think about these things:

  • Write your diary in the first person (I not she) and in the past tense.
  • As Mary, what would you have seen, heard, smelt, touched or even tasted? A description is more powerful if it includes more than one of your senses.
  • Try to use powerful vocabulary rather than everyday words like 'nice' or 'pretty'. A dictionary or thesaurus can be very helpful.
  • Remember to include your feelings about the garden. Are you excited now that you have found it? What do you plan to do next?
  • Question 1

Imagine that Mary kept a diary of her new life in England. What would she have written on the day she discovered the secret garden?

 

You might want to jot some ideas down before you start. Think about these things:

  • Write your diary in the first person (I not she) and in the past tense.
  • As Mary, what would you have seen, heard, smelt, touched or even tasted? A description is more powerful if it includes more than one of your senses.
  • Try to use powerful vocabulary rather than everyday words like 'nice' or 'pretty'. A dictionary or thesaurus can be very helpful.
  • Remember to include your feelings about the garden. Are you excited now that you have found it? What do you plan to do next?
CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Award a maximum of 10 marks for the account.
1) Award one mark if the account is written in the first person throughout.
2 and 3) Award two marks if the account is written consistently in the past tense. Award one mark if the use of the past tense is mostly correct.
4 to 6) Award three marks for a description that includes at least three senses (e.g. what Mary saw, heard and smelt). Award one or two marks if an attempt has been made to do this.
7 and 8) Award up to two marks for examples of powerful vocabulary.
9 and 10) Award up to two marks if Mary's feelings and future plans are included.
Try it ---- OR ----

Sign up for a £1 trial so you can track and measure your child's progress on this activity.

What is EdPlace?

We're your National Curriculum aligned online education content provider helping each child succeed in English, maths and science from year 1 to GCSE. With an EdPlace account you’ll be able to track and measure progress, helping each child achieve their best. We build confidence and attainment by personalising each child’s learning at a level that suits them.

Get started
laptop

Start your £1 trial today.
Subscribe from £10/month.