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Predict What May Happen from Details in Text

In this worksheet, students will be asked to predict story development from details given or implied.

'Predict What May Happen from Details in Text' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:   Reading: Comprehension

Curriculum subtopic:   Predict Story Development

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

In this activity, you will be asked to predict what may happen next in a story from details given or implied.

To be able to predict, you will need to use some of your existing skills.

 

Skills:

 

To be able to read and understand what has happened and is currently happening in the extract.

To be able to retrieve key details that may be obvious or implied.

 

Whenever we are asked to make a prediction, we are asked to answer this simple question:

 

What do you think is going to happen next and why?

 

It is important that you can answer the 'why' by using evidence from the text.

 

In this activity, you will be given an image to look at, if possible, it will be useful for you to discuss this image with a helper.

 

You may wish to discuss:

 

What has just happened?

What is currently happening?

What may happen next?

 

 

 

From looking at this picture, which of the questions from the list can help you to make a sensible prediction about the story the alien is involved in?

Where has this alien come from? Has it been here before?

What colour is the alien?

How old is the alien?

What is the alien's favourite food?

 

 

From looking at this picture, can you make a prediction about what you think the alien is going to do?

 

 

Look at the image above.

 

Which of the questions from the list could help you to make a sensible prediction about the story?

What is the weather like?

What season is it?

Where were the balloons made?

Where are the balloons going?

 

 

Look at the image above.

 

By looking at this picture, can you make a prediction about where you think the balloons are going and why?

When we are making predictions about a story, it improves our sentences if we use modal verbs and adverbs.

Both modal verbs and adverbs show how likely it is that our prediction will happen.

 

A modal verb is an auxiliary verb that expresses necessity or possibility.

An adverb is a word or phrase that modifies or qualifies an adjective.

 

Examples of modal verbs = will, shall, must, cannot, shouldn't.

Examples of adverbs = clearly, certainly, undoubtedly.

 

Read the sentence below carefully and then type the modal verb into the box.

 

Sarah may go to the cinema later.

 

 

When we are making predictions about a story, it improves our sentences if we use modal verbs and adverbs.

A modal verb is an auxiliary verb that expresses necessity or possibility.

An adverb is a word or phrase that modifies or qualifies an adjective.

 

Examples of modal verbs = will, shall, must, cannot, shouldn't.

Examples of adverbs = clearly, certainly, undoubtedly.

 

Read the sentence below carefully and then type the adverb into the box.

 

'Undoubtedly, the tunnel was mysterious, would the girl choose to go through it?'

 

 

 

 

Look at this image of a thunderstorm.

 

Can you write a prediction as to what you think the effects of the thunderstorm will be?

 

Ensure you include a modal verb in your prediction.

 

 

Look at this image of the boy.

 

Write a prediction about where you think he is and what you think he is doing in the box below.

 

Make sure you include an adverb in your prediction.

 

Below are a variety of modal verbs and adverbs.

 

Can you identify each and label accordingly?

 

 

Look carefully at the image of this woman.

 

Can you write a prediction as to what has happened to cause her to show this emotion?

 

You should include an adverb and a modal verb within your prediction.

 

  • Question 1

 

 

From looking at this picture, which of the questions from the list can help you to make a sensible prediction about the story the alien is involved in?

CORRECT ANSWER
Where has this alien come from? Has it been here before?
EDDIE SAYS
The most sensible question to ask to help make a prediction about the story is: 'Where has this alien come from? Has it been here before?' Remember, when you are making a prediction about story development, use the information you are given.
  • Question 2

 

 

From looking at this picture, can you make a prediction about what you think the alien is going to do?

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
To answer the question, the student will need to make a prediction using detail from the image. Hopefully, the student will notice that the alien appears to be 'in action' and can make a prediction accordingly. For example: the student may comment on something the alien may say in a menacing manner.
  • Question 3

 

 

Look at the image above.

 

Which of the questions from the list could help you to make a sensible prediction about the story?

CORRECT ANSWER
Where are the balloons going?
EDDIE SAYS
How did you find this question? Option four, 'Where are the balloons going?' is the most helpful question as it can lead us to think in-depth about the journey of the balloons; where are they going? Who is in the balloons? How long have they been traveling for? Asking open-ended questions encourages us to make sensible predictions about a story.
  • Question 4

 

 

Look at the image above.

 

By looking at this picture, can you make a prediction about where you think the balloons are going and why?

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
To make a detailed prediction about where the balloons are going and why, it will help the student to discuss different elements of the picture. For example, 'Who is on the balloons?' 'Why are they on the balloon?'' 'Where are they, on Earth or in a mystical land?' 'Are they enjoying the journey?' 'Where did the journey begin?' The student can then use their inference skills to work out additional information.
  • Question 5

When we are making predictions about a story, it improves our sentences if we use modal verbs and adverbs.

Both modal verbs and adverbs show how likely it is that our prediction will happen.

 

A modal verb is an auxiliary verb that expresses necessity or possibility.

An adverb is a word or phrase that modifies or qualifies an adjective.

 

Examples of modal verbs = will, shall, must, cannot, shouldn't.

Examples of adverbs = clearly, certainly, undoubtedly.

 

Read the sentence below carefully and then type the modal verb into the box.

 

Sarah may go to the cinema later.

 

 

CORRECT ANSWER
may
EDDIE SAYS
The modal verb in this sentence is 'may'. Try to remember that a modal verb is a 'helping' verb and therefore, can help make your prediction more credible.
  • Question 6

When we are making predictions about a story, it improves our sentences if we use modal verbs and adverbs.

A modal verb is an auxiliary verb that expresses necessity or possibility.

An adverb is a word or phrase that modifies or qualifies an adjective.

 

Examples of modal verbs = will, shall, must, cannot, shouldn't.

Examples of adverbs = clearly, certainly, undoubtedly.

 

Read the sentence below carefully and then type the adverb into the box.

 

'Undoubtedly, the tunnel was mysterious, would the girl choose to go through it?'

 

 

CORRECT ANSWER
Undoubtedly
EDDIE SAYS
The adverb in this sentence is 'undoubtedly'. Try to remember that an adverb gives us more information, think of it as an intensifier. Again, when we use an adverb within a prediction, it helps show how likely it is to happen.
  • Question 7

 

 

Look at this image of a thunderstorm.

 

Can you write a prediction as to what you think the effects of the thunderstorm will be?

 

Ensure you include a modal verb in your prediction.

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Two marks are available here. One mark is available to the student if they include a modal verb. A modal verb such as 'will, may, ought' can show how likely it is that something may happen. One mark is available if they can make a detailed prediction about the aftermath of the thunderstorm, for example; damage to landscape, flooding, people's feelings, damage to property, the brighter weather that follows etc.
  • Question 8

 

 

Look at this image of the boy.

 

Write a prediction about where you think he is and what you think he is doing in the box below.

 

Make sure you include an adverb in your prediction.

 

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
The student can gain one mark for including an adverb in their prediction. Adverbs such as: 'clearly', 'probably', 'possibly' can show how likely it is that something will happen. One mark is available for making a detailed prediction related to the image. The student could deduce that the boy is at a party, a celebration of some sort, comment can be made on his emotions and why he is at the celebration etc.
  • Question 9

Below are a variety of modal verbs and adverbs.

 

Can you identify each and label accordingly?

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
How did you find this question? I'm sure you are really getting the hang of it now! Both modal verbs and adverbs are useful types of words to include within a prediction sentence. For example, you could start a sentence with, 'it's quite likely...' or within a sentence say, 'I predict that...might...because...' Is this becoming less daunting?
  • Question 10

 

 

Look carefully at the image of this woman.

 

Can you write a prediction as to what has happened to cause her to show this emotion?

 

You should include an adverb and a modal verb within your prediction.

 

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
One mark available for including an adverb. One mark available for including a modal verb. One mark available for a prediction as to why the woman is so surprised.
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