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Compare Language in 'Singh Song!' and Other Poems

In this worksheet, students will practise their language comparison skills by considering similarities and differences between 'Singh Song!' and other poems.

'Compare Language in 'Singh Song!' and Other Poems' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 4

GCSE Subjects:   English Literature

GCSE Boards:   AQA

Curriculum topic:   Poetry

Curriculum subtopic:   Love and Relationships: 'Singh Song!'

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

Want to compare your language comparison skills in 'Singh Song!' and other poems in the 'Love and Relationships' cluster?

 

Of course, you do! You've come to the right place.

 

In this activity, you'll practise comparing how the poets use language to convey different and similar attitudes and ideas. 

 

In your exam, you'll do well to compare the ways in which poets use language to present their attitudes. You'll do even better if you can compare the way they use language to show different/similar attitudes and ideas.

 

You'll do the best if you can compare the language and how it is used.

 

 

Open book in library

 

Here's an example of some good language comparison:

 

In 'Singh Song!' Nagra presents the theme of love through the speaker's love for his wife. The quote "above my head high heel tap di ground" reinforces the speaker's pride and love for his wife, and she is physically and symbolically on his mind, tapping away all the time.

 

This theme of love is also present in 'Sonnet 29', and Barrett Browning's speaker shows love through its connection with symbolism. The quote "my thoughts do twine and bud about thee'" reinforces the idea of love being symbolically represented  through natural imagery.

 

Similar to 'Singh Song!', 'Sonnet 29' also shows that the speaker is constantly thinking about her lover.

 

 

"My bride tiny eyes ov a gun..."

 

'Singh Song!' uses metaphors and similes to convey unconventionality

 

Tick one other poem which does this.

 

'Porphyria's Lover'

'Before You Were Mine'

'When We Two Parted'

'Sonnet 29'

In 'Singh Song!' Nagra uses repetition to emphasise a strong emotion.

 

What other poem uses repetition to convey a strong emotion? Pick one out of the options below:

 

An array of red cartoon hearts

'Mother, Any Distance'


'Sonnet 29'


'Before You Were Mine'


'Letters From Yorkshire'

 

In 'Singh Song!' Nagra presents the themes of duty or responsibility through repetition, "from 9 o'clock to 9 o'clock".

 

What one other poem from the selection below also has this theme?

 

'When We Two Parted'

 

'Love's Philosophy'

 

'Follower'

In 'Singh Song!' Nagra uses the simile "like vee rowing through Putney" to represent sexuality and humour.

 

Heart-shaped sweeties

 

In which other poem does the poet use similes to convey sexuality and humour?

 

Pick one:

 

'Eden Rock'

 

'Sonnet 29'

 

'Porphyria's Love'

 

'Love's Philosophy'

How do 'Singh Song!' and 'Sonnet 29' use similes to present sex?

 

Pick one of these options and type its number in the blank below.

 

1. Where 'Singh Song!' uses similes to present sex as a joke, 'Sonnet 29' uses similes to present sex as more serious

 

2. Where 'Singh Song!' uses similes to create a lighthearted and humorous tone for sex between the couple, 'Sonnet 29' uses similes to present sex as something more grounded and natural ... hence the comparison of sex to nature

 

3. Both 'Singh Song!' and 'Sonnet 29' present sex as something funny and lighthearted

How does 'Singh Song!' use language devices similar to those in 'Porphyria's Lover'?

 

Pick one option from below and write its number in the text box.

 

1. Both poems share themes of sex, love and relationships

 

2. Both poems use repetition. In 'Singh Song!' the repetition of "my bride" emphasises the possessive pronoun "my" as well as the pride and excitement in the noun "bride". In 'Porphyria's Lover', Browning uses a similar repetition of the possessive pronoun in "mine, mine fair"

 

3. Both poems use similes. In 'Singh Song!' the simile "like vee rowing through Putney" is used. In 'Porphyria's Lover', the simile "gay feast" is used.

Taking ideas from the question before, how are 'Singh Song!' and 'Porphyria's Lover' different in the way they present possessiveness?

 

Fill out the table below.

Tick the devices that belong to both 'Love's Philosophy' and 'Singh Song!'. The poems definitely share some devices!

 Sexual loveSimiles or MetaphorsHumourTone changeCultural dialectImagery of the moon
'Love's Philosophy'
'Singh Song!'

Name another poem where, like in 'Singh Song!', the tone shifts in the poem.

 

Pick one out of:

 

'Walking Away'

 

'When We Two Parted'

 

'Porphyria's Lover'

We're at the end! Let's make this last question a little easier.

 

From the selection below, pick three language devices that link 'Singh Song! and 'Sonnet 29'.

Imagery of sex

Semantic field of tenderness/love

Persuasion

Similes/metaphors

Natural imagery throughout the poem

Rhetorical questions

  • Question 1

"My bride tiny eyes ov a gun..."

 

'Singh Song!' uses metaphors and similes to convey unconventionality

 

Tick one other poem which does this.

 

CORRECT ANSWER
'Before You Were Mine'
EDDIE SAYS
Remember, in 'Before You Were Mine' with Duffy's mum being compared to Marilyn. Think about the conventional behaviour of women according to their culture and time period, as well.
  • Question 2

In 'Singh Song!' Nagra uses repetition to emphasise a strong emotion.

 

What other poem uses repetition to convey a strong emotion? Pick one out of the options below:

 

An array of red cartoon hearts

'Mother, Any Distance'


'Sonnet 29'


'Before You Were Mine'


'Letters From Yorkshire'

 

CORRECT ANSWER
Before You Were Mine
'Before You Were Mine'
EDDIE SAYS
The repetition in 'Before You Were Mine', especially the way that Duffy uses the possessive pronoun 'mine' in the poem to convey possessiveness over her mother, shows how Duffy uses repetition to convey strong emotion. Remember: repetition is meant to emphasise an idea, a word or a language device that conveys a certain attitude.
  • Question 3

In 'Singh Song!' Nagra presents the themes of duty or responsibility through repetition, "from 9 o'clock to 9 o'clock".

 

What one other poem from the selection below also has this theme?

 

'When We Two Parted'

 

'Love's Philosophy'

 

'Follower'

CORRECT ANSWER
Follower
'Follower'
EDDIE SAYS
This one may seem a little bit difficult because the duty/responsibility presented in 'Follower' isn't presented the same as in 'Singh Song!'. Where 'Follower' discusses the responsibility of the father being switched onto the son, 'Singh Song!' presents the speaker's shopkeeping duties as a nuisance that he rejects in order to spend time with his wife.
  • Question 4

In 'Singh Song!' Nagra uses the simile "like vee rowing through Putney" to represent sexuality and humour.

 

Heart-shaped sweeties

 

In which other poem does the poet use similes to convey sexuality and humour?

 

Pick one:

 

'Eden Rock'

 

'Sonnet 29'

 

'Porphyria's Love'

 

'Love's Philosophy'

CORRECT ANSWER
Love's Philosophy
'Love's Philosophy'
EDDIE SAYS
Out of all the poems, 'Love's Philosophy' most reflects the humorous lightheartedness of sexuality. Look at the way Shelley's flirtatious, slightly persuasive tone seems to present nature and sex as similar. Both poems use similes and metaphors to convey love, humour and sex.
  • Question 5

How do 'Singh Song!' and 'Sonnet 29' use similes to present sex?

 

Pick one of these options and type its number in the blank below.

 

1. Where 'Singh Song!' uses similes to present sex as a joke, 'Sonnet 29' uses similes to present sex as more serious

 

2. Where 'Singh Song!' uses similes to create a lighthearted and humorous tone for sex between the couple, 'Sonnet 29' uses similes to present sex as something more grounded and natural ... hence the comparison of sex to nature

 

3. Both 'Singh Song!' and 'Sonnet 29' present sex as something funny and lighthearted

CORRECT ANSWER
2
EDDIE SAYS
Both poems use similes to enhance the portrayal of sex. You can probably spot the simile in 'Singh Song!' (if you forgot, it's the quote from the question before). Now, look at the similes in 'Sonnet 29' "as wild vines about a tree", "renew thy presence, as a strong tree would" (alongside words such as "bare" and "rustle", these are all sexual, especially in the context of love and coupling). Hopefully, these similes look different to you, because they are! The simile in 'Singh Song!' is a lot more lighthearted, casual, humourous ... and perhaps more obvious, too? The similes in 'Sonnet 29', however, are a lot more weighted, abstract and based on nature. Why do you think the two poets use similes to compare sex to different things? What tone is each poem achieving?
  • Question 6

How does 'Singh Song!' use language devices similar to those in 'Porphyria's Lover'?

 

Pick one option from below and write its number in the text box.

 

1. Both poems share themes of sex, love and relationships

 

2. Both poems use repetition. In 'Singh Song!' the repetition of "my bride" emphasises the possessive pronoun "my" as well as the pride and excitement in the noun "bride". In 'Porphyria's Lover', Browning uses a similar repetition of the possessive pronoun in "mine, mine fair"

 

3. Both poems use similes. In 'Singh Song!' the simile "like vee rowing through Putney" is used. In 'Porphyria's Lover', the simile "gay feast" is used.

CORRECT ANSWER
2
EDDIE SAYS
Both poems use repetition (of the personal pronoun 'my' or 'mine') that emphasises possessiveness in a relationship. However: Just how healthy is the possessiveness of each relationship? Have a think about the way possessiveness is presented in both poems. Which poem presents a healthy possessiveness and which presents an unhealthy possessiveness?
  • Question 7

Taking ideas from the question before, how are 'Singh Song!' and 'Porphyria's Lover' different in the way they present possessiveness?

 

Fill out the table below.

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
This is a tricky one, so well done for having a go! Both poems use possessiveness, with the same kind of device (repetition) to present this. However, look at the way that possessiveness is presented? What actually happens in each poem? Aside from Porphyria's lover killing Porphyria out of jealous possessiveness and Mr Singh simply being infatuated with his wife by displaying a proud possessiveness towards her, look at the way repetition is spaced out in 'Singh Song!'. The repetition of "my bride" throughout the whole of the poem suggests consistency of emotion, a more stable possessiveness. On the other hand, in 'Porphyria's Lover', the repetition of "mine" (line 36) is sudden and random and results in an act of violence which the reader of the poem doesn't expect! So what does this suggest about the stability of the speakers in both poems?
  • Question 8

Tick the devices that belong to both 'Love's Philosophy' and 'Singh Song!'. The poems definitely share some devices!

CORRECT ANSWER
 Sexual loveSimiles or MetaphorsHumourTone changeCultural dialectImagery of the moon
'Love's Philosophy'
'Singh Song!'
EDDIE SAYS
This table should help you revise the differences and similarities. Remember, differences are important, but so are similarities. And if these differences and similarities are expressed through language, structure and (sometimes!) form, try to find a way to explain how. The simplest explanation will do! Start from there and then you can go into detail and start linking language features to themes. For example: 'Love's Philosophy' and 'Singh Song!' both share aspects of romance, sex, love, and humour. But also think about the things that make the two poems different from one another.
  • Question 9

Name another poem where, like in 'Singh Song!', the tone shifts in the poem.

 

Pick one out of:

 

'Walking Away'

 

'When We Two Parted'

 

'Porphyria's Lover'

CORRECT ANSWER
Porphyria's Lover
'Porphyria's Lover'
EDDIE SAYS
Maybe this question is a bit tricky, but it's designed to make you think. Remember, this activity is for revision and it's totally ok to get things mixed up! It's an opportunity to grow and learn more. In 'Porphyria's Lover' we have a shift in tone due to a specific event occurring: the speaker goes and kills Porphyria. So, yes, both 'Singh Song!' and 'Porphyria's Lover' share a shift in tone, due to both poems being plot-based and eventful.
  • Question 10

We're at the end! Let's make this last question a little easier.

 

From the selection below, pick three language devices that link 'Singh Song! and 'Sonnet 29'.

CORRECT ANSWER
Imagery of sex
Semantic field of tenderness/love
Similes/metaphors
EDDIE SAYS
Both poems share a range of language devices. Think about how these language devices show similar and different themes. Remember, the semantic field is basically lots of words that prove there's a running theme/motif in the poem. So, 'Sonnet 29' conveys a constant theme of love: the imagery of nature and love and instinct. 'Singh Song!' conveys the constant preoccupation the speaker has with his wife. Comparisons like these can be intensive, can't they? You've certainly earned a break!
---- OR ----

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