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Magnets 2

In this worksheet, students will be given an opportunity to see magnets in action and to apply their understanding to new areas of magnetism.

'Magnets 2' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:   Forces and Magnets

Curriculum subtopic:   Magnets Attract or Repel

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

Magnets are brilliant aren't they? The fact that they attract and repel each other and also attract certain objects make them fascinating, as there's an invisible force-field around them that makes things move. Not only that but they also act through different materials. It's like magic! But it's science (but as you know, science is magic!).

 

As you go through this worksheet you'll have the opportunity to look at magnets in action in different situations. See whether you can use your knowledge and also the information in the question to work out what's going on.

Here is a picture of three different kinds of magnet, each holding a different number of board pins.

 

Magnets attracting nails

 

Which one do you think is the strongest magnet?

horseshoe magnet

large bar magnet

narrow bar magnet

If you wanted to carry out an investigation like the one in question 1 to discover the strength of different magnets, what would you need to do to make sure it was a fair test?

use magnets of the same size

use board pins of the same size

use the same number of board pins

Look at these magnets holding paperclips:

 

 Magnets holdinjg paperclips

 

 

These results do NOT show a fair test to show how strong each magnet is. Why is this investigation NOT a fair test?

the paperclips are not always in a single line

the magnets are different sizes

the magnets are different shapes

So, let's say that in your fair test investigation using magnets and paperclips you get these results:

 

MAGNET A Holds 5 paperclips
MAGNET B Holds 7 paperclips
MAGNET C Holds 3 paperclips

 

Look at the results and decide which is the strongest magnet.

A

B

C

Here is a picture of the results of your magnetic investigation:

 

Magnets attracting paperclips

 

 

What do you think this result tells us about how we can tell how strong a magnet is?

the biggest magnet is always the strongest

round magnets are the strongest

you cannot tell how strong a magnet is by looking at its size or shape

When two magnets are brought close to each other they sometimes move together. What is this called?

attraction

repelling

magnetism

Two magnets can also push each other away. What is this called?

attracting

repelling

magnetising

  • Question 1

Here is a picture of three different kinds of magnet, each holding a different number of board pins.

 

Magnets attracting nails

 

Which one do you think is the strongest magnet?

CORRECT ANSWER
horseshoe magnet
EDDIE SAYS
Look at how many pins each magnet is holding: the narrow bar magnet has four, the large bar magnet has six but the horseshoe magnet has attracted eight to it, so it must have the strongest force of attraction.
  • Question 2

If you wanted to carry out an investigation like the one in question 1 to discover the strength of different magnets, what would you need to do to make sure it was a fair test?

CORRECT ANSWER
use board pins of the same size
EDDIE SAYS
So you want to see which of your magnets is the strongest - if all the magnets are the same size, they'll probably be the same strength, so that's not right. Then again if you always use the same number of pins you'll always get the same answer, so that's not right. However, it IS important to use pins of the same size and weight as that will affect how many the magnet can hold.
  • Question 3

Look at these magnets holding paperclips:

 

 Magnets holdinjg paperclips

 

 

These results do NOT show a fair test to show how strong each magnet is. Why is this investigation NOT a fair test?

CORRECT ANSWER
the paperclips are not always in a single line
EDDIE SAYS
When trying to find out which magnet is strongest, having different shaped and sized magnets is fine. However, if you're measuring that by transferring the magnetic force through a line of paperclips, then you have to use that technique with all the magnets. Having them clustered around one magnet's poles is not fair.
  • Question 4

So, let's say that in your fair test investigation using magnets and paperclips you get these results:

 

MAGNET A Holds 5 paperclips
MAGNET B Holds 7 paperclips
MAGNET C Holds 3 paperclips

 

Look at the results and decide which is the strongest magnet.

CORRECT ANSWER
B
EDDIE SAYS
Yup, that's fairly straightforward: Magnet B held the most paperclips (7) so it's the strongest.
  • Question 5

Here is a picture of the results of your magnetic investigation:

 

Magnets attracting paperclips

 

 

What do you think this result tells us about how we can tell how strong a magnet is?

CORRECT ANSWER
you cannot tell how strong a magnet is by looking at its size or shape
EDDIE SAYS
In the picture the biggest magnet is not holding the most paperclips, so size cannot tell you the strength. This round magnet is the strongest, but that won't always be the case. So, that means the size and shape of a magnet cannot be used to tell you how strong it is - you'll need to do an experiment to find out. Goodeee!
  • Question 6

When two magnets are brought close to each other they sometimes move together. What is this called?

CORRECT ANSWER
attraction
EDDIE SAYS
When magnets move together they are attracted towards each other - that means they must be opposite poles (N/S) because similar poles repel (push apart). This is caused by the invisible force field around the magnets.
  • Question 7

Two magnets can also push each other away. What is this called?

CORRECT ANSWER
repelling
EDDIE SAYS
When magnets push each other away that is called repelling. That means they must be the same poles: N-N or S-S. When two opposite poles face each other (N-S) they attract each other. By the way, either pole can attract a piece of iron or steel.
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